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How long does it take expats to adjust to this extreme humid weather?

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  1. #1

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    How long does it take expats to adjust to this extreme humid weather?

    I am visiting HK and I see many people wearing long sleeve button shirts probably for work and they aren’t even breaking a sweat walking around in this heat. The other day, I saw a lady in an outfit that covered her entire body with a hat on using the elliptical-like exercise equipment at the park and she wasn’t even sweating. I was wearing shorts and a t-shirt and shirt is soaked in sweat just by walking.

    I’d imagine it’d be horrible if I had to wear a long sleeve button up shirt and trousers for work. Even though the office might be air conditioned, walking to/from work and to/from lunch would be awful! Can a foreigner ever adjust to this weather like locals?

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  2. #2

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    Jan 2016
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    Been here 6 years and still haven't adapted to the humidity. In fact, I never will unless I move back to where I came from.
    I do carry a spare shirt/t-shirt when going out for work though.

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  3. #3

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    May 2006
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    You don't adjust you just get used to it.

    HK_Katherine likes this.

  4. #4

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    Ex Sai Kunger Sunny Qld for now
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    Simple answer, you don't and I lived there a couple of decades.I Immensely disliked spring and summer in Hong Kong, as it makes it unpleasant to sit outside and enjoy ones coffee or to eat a meal. You just ended up melting lol the humidity is on volume 11, the whole time, for 3/4's of the year. Loved winter though!

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  5. #5

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    Agreed. You learn to accept sweeting but it is uncomfortable. I would say you accept it a bit more but then it starts to bother you again. Weather and unrest are my main reasons for looking outside of HK followed by housing woes.

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  6. #6

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    As a bit of a counterpoint, I always hated hot and humid days in the UK during high summer but have got used to the weather here pretty quickly (6-8 months). The turning point for me was a trip to Delhi in 48 degree heat... Leaving HK at 33 degrees and stepping into that seems to have recalibrated what "hot" really means!

    Obviously shorts and t shirt at the weekend is far preferable to a suit, and I certainly don't wear a jacket or tie for most of the year.

    Not sure how true this is but I'm told your blood naturally thins after an extended period in a hot climate... Presume it means I'm going to be freezing when I head back to Europe in November...


  7. #7

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    Two generations?

    Last edited by East_coast; 22-07-2019 at 08:36 AM.

  8. #8

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    It helps if you are as skinny as most locals and not huge and fat like most expats


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoduck:
    Can a foreigner ever adjust to this weather like locals?
    Short answer: No.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrgoodkat:
    It helps if you are as skinny as most locals and not huge and fat like most expats
    Nope, that doesn't help either. I've tried it.
    biffski likes this.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoduck:
    I am visiting HK and I see many people wearing long sleeve button shirts probably for work and they aren’t even breaking a sweat walking around in this heat. The other day, I saw a lady in an outfit that covered her entire body with a hat on using the elliptical-like exercise equipment at the park and she wasn’t even sweating. I was wearing shorts and a t-shirt and shirt is soaked in sweat just by walking.

    I’d imagine it’d be horrible if I had to wear a long sleeve button up shirt and trousers for work. Even though the office might be air conditioned, walking to/from work and to/from lunch would be awful! Can a foreigner ever adjust to this weather like locals?
    The good thing is that the hot and humid weather does not last all year (that would be unbearable for me). Starting in late October and continuing into November, the humidity will start to drop as will the temperature as fall arrives. This is due to the dry Siberian anti-cyclone from the north replacing the warm winds from the South China Sea. Although usually it will only be comfortably cool and dry from December, with temperature dropping sometimes below 10 degrees celisus in January and February. March is the transition to Spring when the weather warms up and April brings the onset of heavy rains. From May to the end of September, it's nasty hot and humid.

    As for people wearing long sleeves, they are doing because they have to return to their office or place of work. HK offices, malls and indoor spaces are notorious for frigid air conditioning. So even on a hot summer day you will say people wearing sweaters.
    Last edited by Coolboy; 22-07-2019 at 09:51 AM.

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