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Charity for household items?

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    @gch555 - How lovely that you are giving your baby stuff away. What an amazing gift for vulnerable mums. Christian Action appears to have a baby and mother outreach programme, but if you click on the “in kind donation” link it automatically directs you to an e-mail form, so I guess you have to e-mail them for further info.


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    863
    Quote Originally Posted by shri:
    IF they are in good condition... The Salvation Army is a good starting point for donation.

    https://recycling.salvationarmy.org....clothing_goods

    I don't know if the Christian Action takes household items but might be worth dropping them a line too.

    https://www.christian-action.org.hk/...vices/refugees


    https://hippiehavenpodcast.com/why-y...alvation-army/

    "In 2004, the Salvation Army’s New York branch was named in a lawsuit filed by 18 current and former employees of its social service arm, claiming that the organization asked about the religious and sexual habits of employees in programs funded by local and state government. They also allegedly put nine-year-old children in a city-funded foster care program through a “confirmation-like” ceremony, where they were given Bibles and prayed over. The Salvation Army didn’t dispute these allegations. Pursuing religious motives in a government funded program is unconstitutional and violates the separation of church and state.Staying true to the theme, the Salvation Army is also against a woman’s bodily autonomy and her right to choose an abortion.
    The Salvation Army’s history is exclusionary at best and downright abusive and illegal at worst. Behavior like this is not something I’d like to support with my donations."

  3. #13

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    @angeluscomplex - I am sure if I scoured the web with intent I might even find something bad about Jesus, Mother Teresa and Gandhi in one article.

    chingleutsch likes this.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    863
    Quote Originally Posted by shri:
    @angeluscomplex - I am sure if I scoured the web with intent I might even find something bad about Jesus, Mother Teresa and Gandhi in one article.
    "
    • In 1998, the Salvation Army refused to comply with San Francisco’s laws regarding domestic-partner benefits, costing it $3.5 million in city contracts and leading to the closure of certain programs for homeless people and the elderly.
    • In 2001, the organization tried to strike a deal with the Bush administration, which would have allowed religious charities that receive federal funding to circumvent local ordinances against anti-LGBTQ discrimination. (The organization also threatened to stop all of its New York City operations in 2004.)
    • In 2012, a Salvation Army branch in Vermont was accused of firing a case worker after learning she was bisexual.
    • Also in 2012, Salvation Army spokesperson George Hood said the organization views same-sex relationships as sinful. “A relationship between same-sex individuals is a personal choice that people have the right to make,” Hood said at the time. “But from a church viewpoint, we see that going against the will of God.”

    In 2011, the New York Times interviewed a man who claimed the Salvation Army denied him and his boyfriend shelter in the ‘90s “unless we broke up and then left the ‘sinful homosexual lifestyle’ behind,” the man, Bill Browning, said. “We slept on the street, and they didn’t help when we declined to break up at their insistence.”
    The Times also published the Salvation Army’s “Position Statement” on homosexuality, which has since been deleted from the organization’s website:
    The Salvation Army does not consider same-sex orientation blameworthy in itself. Homosexual conduct, like heterosexual conduct, requires individual responsibility and must be guided by the light of scriptural teaching. Scripture forbids sexual intimacy between members of the same sex. The Salvation Army believes, therefore, that Christians whose sexual orientation is primarily or exclusively same-sex are called upon to embrace celibacy as a way of life.
    In 2017, ThinkProgress reported that the Salvation Army’s substance abuse center in New York City had engaged in discriminatory behavior against transgender people. The center was one of four New York-based facilities that was found to engage in violations of city laws, including refusing to accept transgender people as patients, assigning rooms to transgender people based on their assigned sex at birth, and requiring transgender patients to undergo physical exams to determine whether they were on hormone therapy or had undergone surgery.
    The organization’s apparent stance isn’t limited to the US: Salvation Army centers in New Zealand and Scotland have lobbied against the repeal of anti-LGBTQ laws."





  5. #15
    ABS
    ABS is offline

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21

    You could also consider putting items in the free section of Asiaxpat, Geoexpat and Carousel, Facebook - marketplace etc. and you would be surprised that people do come and pick up - some care about the environment and some just like the stuff. I have managed to share a lot my stuff in this way and saved them from going in the landfill.


  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    10,838
    Quote Originally Posted by angeluscomplex:
    "
    • In 1998, the Salvation Army refused to comply with San Francisco’s laws regarding domestic-partner benefits, costing it $3.5 million in city contracts and leading to the closure of certain programs for homeless people and the elderly.
    • In 2001, the organization tried to strike a deal with the Bush administration, which would have allowed religious charities that receive federal funding to circumvent local ordinances against anti-LGBTQ discrimination. (The organization also threatened to stop all of its New York City operations in 2004.)
    • In 2012, a Salvation Army branch in Vermont was accused of firing a case worker after learning she was bisexual.
    • Also in 2012, Salvation Army spokesperson George Hood said the organization views same-sex relationships as sinful. “A relationship between same-sex individuals is a personal choice that people have the right to make,” Hood said at the time. “But from a church viewpoint, we see that going against the will of God.”

    In 2011, the New York Times interviewed a man who claimed the Salvation Army denied him and his boyfriend shelter in the ‘90s “unless we broke up and then left the ‘sinful homosexual lifestyle’ behind,” the man, Bill Browning, said. “We slept on the street, and they didn’t help when we declined to break up at their insistence.”
    The Times also published the Salvation Army’s “Position Statement” on homosexuality, which has since been deleted from the organization’s website:
    The Salvation Army does not consider same-sex orientation blameworthy in itself. Homosexual conduct, like heterosexual conduct, requires individual responsibility and must be guided by the light of scriptural teaching. Scripture forbids sexual intimacy between members of the same sex. The Salvation Army believes, therefore, that Christians whose sexual orientation is primarily or exclusively same-sex are called upon to embrace celibacy as a way of life.
    In 2017, ThinkProgress reported that the Salvation Army’s substance abuse center in New York City had engaged in discriminatory behavior against transgender people. The center was one of four New York-based facilities that was found to engage in violations of city laws, including refusing to accept transgender people as patients, assigning rooms to transgender people based on their assigned sex at birth, and requiring transgender patients to undergo physical exams to determine whether they were on hormone therapy or had undergone surgery.
    The organization’s apparent stance isn’t limited to the US: Salvation Army centers in New Zealand and Scotland have lobbied against the repeal of anti-LGBTQ laws."




    They are a religious organization which helps people. Why ignore the help but not the religious aspects? Why should they help everyone? Is it wrong to just help the people you want to help and not others? Surely that's better than not helping anyone? And besides, all your example are in USA which is full of barmy religious nutcases. We are in HK.

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