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Building home gym on 2nd floor, can my building handle it!

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  1. #1

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    Building home gym on 2nd floor, can my building handle it!

    At first, this thought seems silly, but it seems silly not to have this thought too. I live in a house in CWB. Built 40 years ago. Concrete I suppose. Certainly doesn't feel fragile. I'm building a home gym on the second floor. The room is 3.6m x 3.6m. All the gear is coming in next week.

    All the gear, weightplates, dumbells, smith multi-function rack etc actually ends up being 2 tonnes in total. It will be spread evenly across the room and the big rack will be along a wall.

    I can't avoid my imagination running wild. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Thanks!

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  2. #2

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    Max points for originality, sure beats re-hashing covid or political arguments!

    Can't really help much as this is not my area, but can say this: if you're going to deadlift, you need a proper platform. My previous gym had rubber mats placed direct onto a concrete floor, and people dropping the bar eventually smashed the concrete under the mats.

    huja likes this.

  3. #3

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    Thanks, yes I haven't seen many posts like this, so thanks!

    Yes, I will have heavy-duty gym mats across the entire room. Yes, better go easy on dropping heavy weights. I would hate to tear down the house!


  4. #4

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    I was thinking more along the lines of a wooden platform, then with mats over it, if you're going to deadlift.

    The floor that saw damaged was already covered in heavy duty mats, and generally used with bumper plates. Although because it was a public gym, maybe people were using the non-bumpers there as well.


  5. #5

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    The setups I have seen for home use have involved platforms of sorts for both impact and noise reduction ( correlated.. Dunno).

    With concrete slabs in our building we can still hear when someone upstairs walks around in heels or drops metal objects..would hate to live below someone who drops weights.


  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by MASTER-OF-HK:
    All the gear is coming in next week.
    You shall find out in the coming weeks if it can handle it or not.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by emx:
    You shall find out in the coming weeks if it can handle it or not.
    That's very reassuring.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by shri:
    The setups I have seen for home use have involved platforms of sorts for both impact and noise reduction ( correlated.. Dunno).

    With concrete slabs in our building we can still hear when someone upstairs walks around in heels or drops metal objects..would hate to live below someone who drops weights.
    Luckily, it's a house so no-one below, but still. Noise not an issue, but falling through the floor would be a concern.
    shri likes this.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl:
    I was thinking more along the lines of a wooden platform, then with mats over it, if you're going to deadlift.

    The floor that saw damaged was already covered in heavy duty mats, and generally used with bumper plates. Although because it was a public gym, maybe people were using the non-bumpers there as well.
    Yes, I know what you mean. A weightlifting platform would be ideal. But just the weight sitting there is a bit concerning right.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MASTER-OF-HK:
    Yes, I know what you mean. A weightlifting platform would be ideal. But just the weight sitting there is a bit concerning right.
    This is firmly in the realm of engineering, not sure I've come across anyone on the forum that specialises in this.

    I know one guy who's set up a rack in is apartment, and I've been involved in similar for a roof. But the total weights have been much lower (400kg + rack). Nowhere near 2 tons.

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