shanghai vs hk

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  1. #1

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    shanghai vs hk

    i have the option of relocating to shanghai...
    ive never been there so i have no idea what its like living there.

    does anyone have any first hand experience living there?
    whats it like in comparison to hk?
    something i really enjoy about hk is the fact that there is a lot of nature outside the city, can i find this in shanghai?
    is it more cut throat living in shanghai vs hk? (ive heard it was)

    would appreciate any info thanks!


  2. #2

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    Take a trip there yourself -- there are often weekend deals through DragonAir -- in order to find out. There are some who prefer SH and some who prefer HK; it's all depending on your preference.

    (Personally, I prefer Shanghai, but that's because I a) speak Mandarin, b) prefer Mainland food, and c) enjoy leisurely workdays.)


  3. #3

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    Also consider that Shanghai like the rest of Mainland China is still very much the Wild West for things like food safety, health care,... when compared to HK. Pollution in Shanghai is also much worse then in HK, without the green escapes you have here. Then there's other issues like censorship and higher crimes rates on the mainland.

    Having lived in both places, I personally really prefer HK.


  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gatts:
    Pollution in Shanghai is also much worse then in HK, without the green escapes you have here.
    There are green escapes in Shanghai, though they're on the outer edges of the city. There are also much nicer and larger parks and more trees on the street and in residential complexes. I was terribly shocked when I moved to HK about the lack of such trees.

    The air pollution in Shanghai doesn't seem as bad to me as that of Hong Kong, but that could be due as much to weather as anything. The tap water is not potable, however, so everyone boils it or gets delivered water (or both). Delivered water is much cheaper than such in Hong Kong, but that's of course assuming that you trust your company.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gatts:
    Then there's other issues like censorship and higher crimes rates on the mainland
    Oh, yes. Don't purchase a bicycle and keep it outside, unless you really want to donate it to your kind friends.

    But for censorship (online, at least), there are ways around it.


    Things are generally cheaper in Shanghai. Housing is larger and cheaper (so long as you don't live in Xintiandi or other ritzy new complexes). Utilities are cheaper. But things in even the nicest of places are often slapped together in the cheapest of methods. In one of the lovely lane homes on Liyang Road in Hongkou where we lived, our power constantly went out during the winter if we ran the heater that our landlord had purchased at the same time as the washer and computer. After the third time, the repairman dispatched by the local substation of the power company told us that the reason was because the wire was melting because we ran too many things. Yes, the wire -- rather than fuses or anything newer than the 1890s. Knowing that the building had been recently renovated, I asked why it was still using such old-fashioned equipment; his reply was that he didn't know, but that it was probably cheaper to send him out each time to fix it for free rather than simply replacing the box. aiyo~

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hokuto:
    But things in even the nicest of places are often slapped together in the cheapest of methods.
    this has struck me every time I have visited the Mainland...just saw the spanking new Terminal 3 at the airport in Beijing, and have to say after the initial awe at the immensity of it, a closer look at the details revealed a clear lack of quality fit and finish compared to CLK, and I'd say the same about Shanghai Pudong to a much greater degree...not having lived in either city, am I right in assuming a similar level of quality in the residential construction?
    Last edited by timklip; 20-04-2009 at 10:25 PM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by timklip:
    not having lived in either city, am I right in assuming a similar level of quality in the residential construction?
    Many places can be that way, yes. The building itself may be solid, but the extras -- pipes, wiring, paint, etc. -- can be low quality (even in nice places!). Although this is certainly less an issue in the larger cities than elsewhere. Once, while visiting a friend in a medium-sized Jiangsu town north of Shanghai, we accidentally melted (!!) the drainage pipe of her bathroom sink by running the hot water at too high a heat.

  7. #7

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    LOL

    How do you explain that to the landlord?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hokuto:
    Once, while visiting a friend in a medium-sized Jiangsu town north of Shanghai, we accidentally melted (!!) the drainage pipe of her bathroom sink by running the hot water at too high a heat.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hokuto:


    In one of the lovely lane homes on Liyang Road in Hongkou where we lived, our power constantly went out during the winter if we ran the heater that our landlord had purchased at the same time as the washer and computer.
    A job lot, was it?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by timklip:
    am I right in assuming a similar level of quality in the residential construction?
    Shanghai has developed incredibly quickly, the construction companies have been resorting to adding accelerants to speed up cement curing. A lot of press about illnesses due to such chemicals has been generated. Similarly to some HK properties you might see a lot of cracks appearing very early and the house value will drop.

    Here in HK it was about using salt water for curing by one of the companies, so all their properties are now valued lower on the market.

  10. #10

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    Shanghai's subway closes at 11 pm. Crazy!!!

    Very spread out large city with more of a travel challenge to get to what you can reach in HK in the way of beaches, hiking places, etc.

    Lots of expats all over that city but I am not sure it is as safe as HK if safety is an issue. Everything is relative of course.

    I met a woman (wife of computer company manager) from Texas in Shanghai who told her husband over several years of thinking over this chance to go to China that if he ever went to Shanghai he'd be going alone. After 3 months she says she loves it there and was off to pick up her mom at the airport. Of course she had just come back from Beijing and the Great Wall etc and was on a huge high from that.

    I met a visiting business prof at HKU last year who had also been doing some teaching in Shanghai where he and his wife had spent a bit of time absent from HK where he was not a long term resident. He was very clear that he and his wife loved HK and had no taste for ever living in Shanghai due to size, spread out nature, etc. They loved HK (after Boston IIRC) as here everything is readily available from doctors to shops to leisure and eating. There they had to travel too long to get these things.

    Now ask the ones who have lived there and some will say it is vastly superior to here.

    I had lunch with an exec recruiter last week who has spent most of her life in the UK from age 11 on and some considerable time in Shanghai. She thinks it is fantastic there and feels more like a Shanghai person than a HK resident. She loves the business climate there and feels that business is much more closer to how UK business works than here in HK.


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