Wilson Trail - Sculptures / shrine .. what do they mean?

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  1. #1

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    Wilson Trail - Sculptures / shrine .. what do they mean?

    Could those of you who know a bit about locals stuff (bookblogger?) have a look at my latest blog post and tell me if you know what all that stuff is about? Having encountered it in the woods yesterday I'd be really fascinated to hear the story behind it. Thanks.


  2. #2

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    No idea - seen a fair few odd things in the hills while hiking.

    AWESOME photo of the view, by the way - I was locked in an office yesterday thinking it would be a great day for hiking!


  3. #3

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    (Edited the title to add a little bit more incentive for the knowledgeable to click on the thread)


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    The last photo, according the folks in the office means "Shrine of the goddess looking at the sea". (Atleast that is what I think they were trying to tell me)


  5. #5

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    The Standard has an old article on it:

    The Standard - China's Business Newspaper

    Abridged version here:

    Descending to Ma Yau Tong, we came across sprightly 84-year-old Lee Chun-bor, keeper of what appeared to be the most irreverent Buddhist shrine in Hong Kong, its entrance guarded by Japanese soldiers.

    Talking to the jovial old-timer was the highlight of what would become a very frustrating day.

    He explained that he had been coming to this hillside for 23 years. and had planted fruit trees and even used his small government pension to buy cement to build a pathway which is now crossed by the Wilson Trail.

    Eight years ago, while removing undergrowth, he came across an abandoned Buddhist shrine under a boulder, which he restored, and then set about sculpting his brightly painted guard of honour on the pathway he constructed outside the entrance.

    This weird assortment includes the Japanese soldiers, rifles at the ready, a sumo wrestler, Sikh bank guards, a dog, a pop singer, a couple dancing, a drug addict smoking from a water pipe, a belly dancer, and even a pregnant woman.

    " I make them from cement and soil, and then paint them," said Mr Lee. " It's good fun. I create anything that comes into my mind. People love it. See that one over there with the blue and white striped shirt and the white hair? Well that was supposed to be Sun Yat-sen, but it didn't work out, so I made him into a gweilo instead."

    He also made a picnic site at the side of the track, but dismantled it because people were leaving too much rubbish. I left wondering if walkers on this new trail would do the same.

  6. #6

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    Excellent read .. thanks!


  7. #7

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    Pekkerhead,

    Thanks very much indeed for that. I fear that the reason that the statues are now falling into disrepair is that Mr Lee was 84 when that article was written in 1996, so I suspect he isn't around to maintain them now, which is a great shame. Somebody is maintaining the shrine itself, but clearly not the statues.


  8. #8

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    PDLM - Would explain that mid 90s phone....


  9. #9

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    Interesting information guys, thanks.


  10. #10

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    Thanks Pekkerhead! I didn't know all that.


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