Tipping is not a place in China

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  1. #1

    Tipping is not a place in China

    Can anyone give me the general info on how gratuity works over here? My cousin told me that most places already charge for service in the initial price. I don't know if that's true or not. Enlighten me!

    Thanks in advance.


  2. #2

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    from what I have observed/heard the locals don't tend to tip, at least in local places. In western bars/restaurants it seems that a modest tip is offered.


  3. #3

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    Yeah, most places add 10% service charge to their bill


  4. #4

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    Taxi drivers almost always round up to the next dollar (or 50 cents). Nothing more is required.

    Restaurants almost always add 10%. Nothing more is required. I might occasionally add more if the service has been exceptional.

    Bars - some bars add 10% and then have snotty barmen who whip change away quite quickly if you don't claim it. I tend to avoid such places (the Peak Cafe springs to mind). There's no way I am paying a barman HK$5-6 each time he opens a bottle. Plenty of places charge reasonable prices and don't then try to gouge you for more.

    In the above, any service at table makes it a "restaurant" in my mind, in which case I'll normally leave a few bucks (by which I mean between HK$5 and HK$20 or so, depending on how big the bill is) when I get the bill if the service has been friendly and they haven't already added 10%. By "bar" I mean actually sitting at a bar.

    Er, hotels, I guess you might tip a guy who brings heavy bags to your room if you are too lazy to do it yourself. I'd guess HK$10 per bag or so.


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:

    Bars - some bars add 10% and then have snotty barmen who whip change away quite quickly if you don't claim it. I tend to avoid such places (the Peak Cafe springs to mind). There's no way I am paying a barman HK$5-6 each time he opens a bottle.
    Agree that tipping for a guy to open your beer doesn't make a lot of sense, but if you're into the harder stuff and give a modest tip the first time you buy, you'll often find they suddenly become very generous when they pour your next one

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by saltwater:
    Agree that tipping for a guy to open your beer doesn't make a lot of sense, but if you're into the harder stuff and give a modest tip the first time you buy, you'll often find they suddenly become very generous when they pour your next one
    That is the one thing that I really like about Asia in general. Tips aren't really required. At bars in Texas we usually have to tip 5-10 USD a round (that would be about 4-6 drinks).

    And in restaurants, between tax and tips, you end up paying about 1.25 what the menu price of your meal is.

    C

  7. #7

    If you add to the 10%, try to strategically give it to the waiter/waitress as I have been told that otherwise it usually goes to the "establishment" - usually no reason to give the restaurant more money.

    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    I might occasionally add more if the service has been exceptional.

  8. #8

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    If I'm going to spend more than a couple of hours in a bar, I'll tip semi decently on the first round and then when I'm leaving, IF I think I'm going to go back. Works like a charm.

    Luckily my fav place (Schnubarrts) does not add the 10% and I usually end up rounding up generously .. been doing that for well over 12-13 years now.


  9. #9

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    I would normally give between 10% and 15%, rounded up - so, say, for $50 I might give $55 but for $70 I'd probably give $80 - except that I get annoyed when it's added onto the bill, so I normally just stick to the fixed 10% in that case.

    The cafe across the road from my building charges $44 for my regular (a big plate of veg'n'noodles), so I just give them $50 - for the few $ difference, they like me, remember me, and remember my regular order, which is useful, since the staff have very little English between them and it makes ordering much easier


  10. #10

    I'm guessing I would know if they have already added gratuity by looking at the receipt? Thanks again for all the tips