Water seepage + Environmental Protection Department letter

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  1. #1

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    Dec 2003
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    Water seepage + Environmental Protection Department letter

    Hi,

    My wife has the letter, but I believe the agency named the Environmental Protection Department has sent us a letter about water seepage allegedly from my flat.

    Now I am personally not sure. We had a security guard get a complaint about seepage from us too like a couple of months ago, but they determined it wasn't us. This was according to what my wife just told me over the phone, so I am not sure if I got all the details 100% right. I wasn't around when this security guard thing went down.

    Anyways what kind of concerns me is that the letter claims the EPD has the right to enter my flat. Is this really the case? I tend to have a policy of not letting any sort of law enforcement in unless they have a search warrant, though I guess all the EPD can do is levy a fine. Can anyone confirm if there is an ordinance that indeed does give them the right?

    My wife tried to call him but he wasn't in his office. We're trying to find out exactly what they're looking for over the phone before we let them in.

    Edit: Correction, it's the Food and Environmental Hygine Department

    Anyways my wife and I are a bit concerned about this seepage issue too. Should any plumber be able to investigate and correct something like this? Or will I need some kind of specialist? We're the property owners.

    Last edited by ohchk2001; 24-05-2010 at 07:44 PM.

  2. #2

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    Usually the management office have a list of plumbers which work on the estate.

    Maybe it's just a seeping air con. They do have the condensed water dripping down to the neighbors sometimes. In this case any air con service company will do. Same here, usually the management office have contact details for somebody that worked there before.

    I don't think they would come end enter your flat without shooting another warning letter. It almost sounds like you are afraid they'd discover your indoor weed farm if they'd enter your flat ;-)

    Why not ask the people in the flat below you if they know what's the problem? I once had my downstairs neighbors complaining that there is a leak in my shower (building was almost new). It went through the management office/security guard, but after we called a plumber all was fixed with no problems and I never heard from them again.

    Last edited by 100LL; 24-05-2010 at 08:47 PM.

  3. #3

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    Yes they can, with fairly basic authority - they need to give you two hours notice, but that can be by a notice posted on your door if no-one is there or answers it.
    Cap 132 s 126 General powers of entry (PUBLIC HEALTH AND MUNICIPAL SERVICES ORDINANCE)


  4. #4

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    don't be surprise, they are not the only people that can enter your unit without a search warrant. your building management can also enter with sufficient notice.


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by thundacatchergo:
    don't be surprise, they are not the only people that can enter your unit without a search warrant. your building management can also enter with sufficient notice.
    Well building management isn't government nor are they law enforcement. Though that type of intrusion isn't welcome either. But in emergencies such as a fire, flooding, or anything else that would warrant this I can understand.

    Thanks PDLM for the clause, I'll keep that in mind.

    I'll get this seepage problem resolved ASAP and get in touch with the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department on this.

  6. #6

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    building management isnt government but they have a lot more authority than you think. there rights of entry is not only limited to emergencies.


  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    Yes they can, with fairly basic authority - they need to give you two hours notice, but that can be by a notice posted on your door if no-one is there or answers it.
    Cap 132 s 126 General powers of entry (PUBLIC HEALTH AND MUNICIPAL SERVICES ORDINANCE)
    What I understood from link is that they would still need a warrant to enter your premises if you refuse to let them in.

  8. #8

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    Then I'm afraid you need to brush up on your English comprehension. That's not what it says. It says that they can enter without a warrant on two hours written notice, or immediately with a warrant.