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Does ABC have ROA?

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  1. #81

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    1,592

    Has anyone been through the naturalisation process and can comment on how it goes?


  2. #82

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by dossier:
    Has anyone been through the naturalisation process and can comment on how it goes?
    It doesn't look as though you'll get a reply as - for some reason - there aren't many foreign PRs settled in Hong Kong who take up the option to naturalise as Chinese citizens.

    My understanding is that you can do so after 7 years legit residence in HK & having acquired PR status. However, as the PRC does not recognise dual nationality, you will have to renounce your existing nationality & provide documentation to that effect.

    If you are currently a British Citizen, you can renounce by filling in the appropriate form (downloadable from UK gov website) & get a letter from the UK Home Office confirming your renunciation once it has been approved.

    My understanding is that the UK allows former British Citizens to apply for restoration following renunciation - but only once. So theoretically British Citizens can renounce their citizenship for the purpose of obtaining a foreign citizenship where that is required (eg Chinese), and then apply for restoration afterwards...However whether that would then invalidate your newly obtained Chinese citizenship I am not sure, since under Chinese nationality law any Chinese citizen who voluntarily acquires foreign citizenship automatically loses Chinese citizenship. (With the exception of HK-born Chinese where effective dual nationality is tolerated although not recognised, but this doesn't apply to others.)
    dossier likes this.

  3. #83

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,602

    This is a great topic and certainly a tremendous source of help for many of us.

    However, I feel it can also get confusing and DETER people from trying their luck with Immigration.

    My advice is: File an application for HKPIDC, then Immigration will get back to you with specific questions and requirements.

    They are VERY generous and supportive, IF you know how to argue with them about certain documents and circumstances.

    dossier likes this.

  4. #84

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    107

    ROA information

    Quote Originally Posted by Morrison:
    This is a great topic and certainly a tremendous source of help for many of us.

    However, I feel it can also get confusing and DETER people from trying their luck with Immigration.

    My advice is: File an application for HKPIDC, then Immigration will get back to you with specific questions and requirements.

    They are VERY generous and supportive, IF you know how to argue with them about certain documents and circumstances.
    The information below may be helpful for those who want to explore the possibility. I was born in HK but immigrated to the US in the 80's. As time went by, China became a dominant economic player globally. So much so that sudden, I felt the need to reestablish my legal rights as a HK born Chinese so that I have a option in the future. So I took a 3 week vacation to HK in 2007 with my birth certificate, marriage certificate, my old British passport etc. in an effort to apply my ROA. It was an easy process if my name on the birth cert was the same as my US passport. Since there were discrepancies in spelling, it took a lot more work to prove I am who I claimed to be, but I eventually received my Smart Identity Card. Now I don't have to wait in line for the immigration procedure after arrival. I just simply walk up to the HK Residents exit and insert the card to the reader. I am cleared from immigration. That's great!




    Article 24 defines who may become a Hong Kong Permanent Resident and have the right of abode in Hong Kong. It states:

    1. Chinese citizens born in Hong Kong before or after the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region;
    2. Chinese citizens who have ordinarily resided in Hong Kong for a continuous period of not less than seven years before or after the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region;
    3. Persons of Chinese nationality born outside Hong Kong of those residents listed in categories (1) and (2);
    4. Persons not of Chinese nationality who have entered Hong Kong with valid travel documents, have ordinarily resided in Hong Kong for a continuous period of not less than seven years and have taken Hong Kong as their place of permanent residence before or after the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region;
    5. Persons under 21 years of age born in Hong Kong of those residents listed in category (4) before or after the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; and
    6. Persons other than those residents listed in categories (1) to (5), who, before the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, had the right of abode in Hong Kong only.

    On the other hand, Article 22 states that for the purpose of entry into Hong Kong, people from other parts of China must apply for approval. Among them, the number of persons who enter the Region for the purpose of settlement shall be determined by the competent authorities of the Central People's Government after consulting the Hong Kong government.

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