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Do the 150 unskilled Chinese immigrants get welfare benefits?

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  1. #31

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    I'm a bit surprised by the cleanliness comparison. I lived in the mainland for three years, or so, and never noticed 'trash everywhere'. (rats, yes, trash, no). In fact, I see far more detritus littering the pavements when I step out of my buidling in Wanchai every morning than ever I did when I lived in Guangdong. It is entirely possible, however, I may have been living in unusually clean, 'up market' places in the mainland, whilst my flat above the bus stops of Hennessy Road is bound to attract a billion cigarette butts and discarded food wrappings each night.

    Still, I do have some sympathy for those HK parents who warn their offspring of the dangers of crime in the mainland. In my three years there, I was a victim of four opportunitic thefts, whilst my colleagues between them notched up about eight motorbike bag snatches, a range of mobile 'phone grabs, a couple of large-scale frauds and one pretty much unspeakable act against the person. Compared to the relative safety of Hong Kong, the mainland does demand a more comprehensive application of sensible precautions.

    Last edited by M Khan; 05-11-2010 at 03:59 PM.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook:
    You better get used to the idea of becoming part of the mainland, because the HKSAR, SZEZ and possibly ZHSEZ are penned to merge as one SAR/SEZ . That's the game plan in the not so distant future.

    Resistance is futile, you will be assimilated...
    I bet the SAR will be extended after 2047. It's nowhere as straightforward as you claim it is. Sure Shenzen will have closer economic ties and going through the border will be more streamlined, but the fact is that the legal systems are completely different. Apples and Oranges.

    Why mess stuff up when HK is already a part of China as an SAR?

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Mat:
    Ah, the big hypocrisy on here!

    MOST Hong Kong people have parents or grand parents coming (or still living) in China.

    They are no different from Mainlanders.
    Indeed The emergence of a separate identity of "Hongkonger / Hong Kong yan" is actually a fairly recent phenomenon, since perhaps the 1970s/80s, in tandem with economic prosperity, new generations that were born & brought up in Hong Kong with a sense of a distinct socio-economic-cultural identity; & probably the ending of the 'touch base' policy (whereby any mainlander who crossed the border & reached urban Hongkong automatically became a legal resident.) reinforced a new attitude of "them & us" towards mainlanders.

    In earlier decades, before the war, there wasn't even any border control between China & colonial HK - people just crossed back & forth between the New Territories & what is now Shenzhen. Historically, geographically & demographically it was all part of the same area - Hong Kong was simply a part of what used to be called Bao An (previously Xin An) County, along with what is now Shenzhen, Longgang, etc.

    There are obvious practical reasons for having Hong Kong as a separate immigrational entity from the rest of China for the foreseeable future, until economic convergence makes it unnecessary, perhaps by 2047? It is 'One Country' after all. Ultimately one day I think it will be like the USA - a continental sized country where its citizens are free to move to whichever part of the country they wish, although the major cities, with their socioeconomic opportunities, will naturally continue to exert an attraction for internal migration.
    Last edited by Elfin safety; 07-11-2010 at 05:01 AM.

  4. #34

    Another point - in traditional Chinese culture, you are "from" the place of your paternal ancestry, not where you were born or where you reside. It would be, in traditional Chinese culture at least, rather curious & anomalous for a Chinese person born in Hong Kong with paternal ancestry somewhere else in Guangdong Province (as many are, for example) to say "Hong Kong", if asked where they hail from.


    The emergence of a separate Hong Kong identity is a rather fascinating phenomenon in that regard.

    Last edited by Elfin safety; 07-11-2010 at 05:27 AM.
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  5. #35

    What year did the "touch base" policy officially end?


  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by truemandate:
    What year did the "touch base" policy officially end?
    It was 1980 or so if I recall correctly.
    Posted via Mobile Device

  7. #37

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    I happen to find this forum and I suddenly realised that I am one of those 150 unskilled Chinese migrants ( I settled in HK two years ago). I really want to know, can ignorance and arrogance make people more skillful here?

    Last edited by hui; 15-11-2010 at 04:37 PM.
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  8. #38

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    You make it sound like we're living a in a whole NEW country.

    Like we're living in China!


  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Elfin safety:
    It was 1980 or so if I recall correctly.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Really? Have there ever been similar "touch base" policies in other jurisdictions?

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by hui:
    I happen to find this forum and I suddenly realised that I am one of those 150 unskilled Chinese migrants ( I settled in HK two years ago). I really want to know, can ignorance and arrogance make people more skillful here?
    Please stick around, Hui, we like input from all kinds of expats on this forum.