Like Tree21Likes

Chinese Name - A new identity

Closed Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    359

    There are two famous celebrities here:

    大牛 (Daniel Newham), full Chinese name is 牛漢生 or 牛汉生. He is in a white shirt from the video.

    Daniel Newham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    大山 (Mark Rowswell), full Chinese name is 马克·罗斯韦尔.

    Dashan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Dark Side of the Earth
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by bryant.english:
    I live next door to Beatrix Potter
    And her son Harry?

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    6,191
    Quote Originally Posted by InigoMontoya:
    And her son Harry?
    If her and her hubby have kids I'll have to say something right? When she introduced herself to me as Beatrix I nearly choked!
    InigoMontoya likes this.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14,448
    Quote Originally Posted by bookblogger:
    Da Shan's English name is Mark, not Daniel.
    Oops my mistake got the two confused, But then all westerners look the same to us Chinese

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,043

    Never had anyone show offense - quite the contrary much like our company name in English to Chinese they give us positive feedback. I guess when they say nothing - you never know.

    祈柏恆 - Cantonese Kei Pak Hang or Putonghua- Qi Baiheng

    This is like my English surname a bit and I get a lot of positive comments from Chinese people when they look at my business card.

    I think offense might be taken if they use your Chinese name and you don't know it or respond to it.

    I was introduced at a business awards event run by a faculty at HK Polytech where I was in the audience and not part of the event officially. The lady hosting used my Chinese name only. The audience applauded when I stood up so she upped the ante and said next year I can come up and write it for them but in Chinese... That got applause as they knew they'd stump me on that.

    Khaemis and mingming like this.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by InigoMontoya:
    Whatever you do, don't make the mistake many international students from Asia do when they are studying in the West - if I meet another Calvin Klein I will scream.
    haha! Really... definitely no heading that way

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    51

    Hi Everyone,

    Well I can see that funny stories can come out of what I would call 'blunders' when picking a Chinese name. I think I will have to stick to my name until later.
    It would make more sense for me to immerse to the culture before I take a decision. If it's not a problem to not have a Chinese name when I arrive in HK and doesn't offend anyone then I'll do that.

    My intention is to immerse as fully as I can so first step is to learn cantonese. I'll leave the decision of my Chinese name to locals. Hopefully they'll give me a name that fits with my personality.

    Many thanks all


  8. #28

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    8,330

    One of my HK coworkers was named Scott. He just decided one weekend to change his name and came in one Monday and declared his name was now Andy. Weird. Whats up with that?


  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    2,087
    Quote Originally Posted by bdw:
    One of my HK coworkers was named Scott. He just decided one weekend to change his name and came in one Monday and declared his name was now Andy. Weird. Whats up with that?
    They do it with their Chinese names too - just yesterday I met met someone who had changed her given name from On Li to Hoi Yin - her ID card had been changed and she was off to change her passport - with her mum, because she's only 13 years old!

    OP, my very erudite, Cantonese and Mandarin speaking first language teacher gave me my Chinese name, which bears passable resemblance to my longer northern European name. Having learned to listen for it in both its (most useful) Chinese forms I have found it a lot easier to recognise when I'm being called in government offices and banks, where my "real" name gets mangled in assorted ways! It has also been enormously helpful when working in Taiwan and mainland.
    The moral being, that if you want a Chinese name then make sure you get a well-educated local to figure one out for you - don't try and DIY.
    Last edited by chingleutsch; 14-03-2011 at 05:47 PM.
    mingming likes this.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    6,191
    Quote Originally Posted by bdw:
    One of my HK coworkers was named Scott. He just decided one weekend to change his name and came in one Monday and declared his name was now Andy. Weird. Whats up with that?
    Scott nothing to do with you...he wanted a change Andy did...
    bdw and mingming like this.