Right to land without stars...

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1

    Right to land without stars...

    I'm sure this has been asked before, but I need some clarification.
    I was granted the Right to Land and my parents were born and raised in Hong Kong, but became Canadian citizens before I was born.

    Anyways, I just noticed that I don't have any stars on my ID...is that correct?

    having read other threads, I've gathered that the three stars means unconditional re-entry... since i have the right to land I'm allowed to come and go as I please right? so wouldn't that mean i have unconditional re-entry?


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    626

    *** means HK Chinese citizen over 18, * means HK Chinese Citizen under 18. Some people have *** by mistake but that's what its SUPPOSED to be, anyway.


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    290
    "Right to Land"

    "A person formerly in possession of permanent residence in Hong Kong SAR retains the right to land (RTL). The Immigration Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region states on its website that “[a] person who ceases to have the status of a permanent resident of the HKSAR will automatically acquire the right to land in Hong Kong in accordance with the law.” RRT Country Advice HKG358071 has previously addressed the issue of whether former residents of pre-1997 Hong Kong are entitled to the right to land in the HKSAR, establishing that there are provisions in HKSAR law that allow such persons the right to apply to have the right to land granted.

    According to the Immigration Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, RTL allows the holder “to enter Hong Kong freely to live, study or work without any restriction.” This is not, however, the same as permanent residence or citizenship as a RTL holder may be deported and is not entitled to a permanent identity card or a Hong Kong SAR passport. These are only granted to persons in possession of the Right of Abode (indicated by possession of a permanent identity card) and in possession of Chinese nationality."

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  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    60

    Right to Land is by definition only given to non-Chinese nationals. It is impossible for someone to have "***RO" or "*RO". "***AO" or "*AO" is possible, given to persons born overseas to Chinese parents who did not have any form of permanent residency abroad (or born to a country like Japan that does not practice jus soli). The confusion arises because "***AO" basically means "Chinese citizen with the Right of Abode" after 1997 while "***AO" meant "British Dependent Territories Citizen with the Right of Abode" before 1997. British nationality law extended to overseas born children regardless of whether foreign nationality was acquired at birth or whether the parents settled abroad, while Chinese nationality law does not extend to overseas born children who acquired nationality at birth and whose parents had "settled abroad." There are some people "***AO" who are holdovers from this pre-1997 broader application of the governing nationality law.