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Do HKSAR Govt. allow DUAL nationality?

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  1. #31

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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by raionheart:
    Nope my mother was not settled in foreign country yet when I was born. She only had a visa/greencard to US. So if we were able to show a photocopy of it with the date and my birth certificate it would be a good way to build the case? I also still have my Hong Kong passport from when I was younger .

    My father was born and raised in china not HK so I believe the rules/regulations are somewhat different. And from reading articles online china does not recognize dual citizenship. So he could hold only one which is his US one.

    Are these the documents I should use to apply?
    And do I apply for both ROA and Identity card at the same time?

    http://www.immd.gov.hk/pdforms/ROP1.pdf

    http://www.immd.gov.hk/pdforms/rop169.pdf

    Many thanks again.
    I really appreciate all the input
    Green card means "settled in the US". Compare your birthdate with the "Resident since" date on your mother's green card. If you were born before your mother's "Resident since" date, you are a Chinese national and over the mail you can apply for Certificate of Entitlement to the Right of Abode in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

  2. #32

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    Not sure why people want dual citizenship, make a choice, it's not hard. Either you want to butter your bread both sides but you will still get slimy hands.....and you want to sponge off both countries.

    That is very Chinese. That is, having your cake and eat it too.


  3. #33

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    I suggest you read a few articles about this subject matter


  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by virago:
    Not sure why people want dual citizenship, make a choice, it's not hard. Either you want to butter your bread both sides but you will still get slimy hands.....and you want to sponge off both countries.

    That is very Chinese. That is, having your cake and eat it too.
    Dual citizenship is very common in Hong Kong for historical reasons, and that it's basically allowed in a lot of cases. I do agree morally speaking, it's like having it both ways, but if they can, then they're entitled to do so.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hairball:
    Dual citizenship is very common in Hong Kong for historical reasons, and that it's basically allowed in a lot of cases. I do agree morally speaking, it's like having it both ways, but if they can, then they're entitled to do so.
    Sorry I had a few drinks last night. Apologies for my stupid comments .
    anothercanuck likes this.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by virago:
    Not sure why people want dual citizenship, make a choice, it's not hard. Either you want to butter your bread both sides but you will still get slimy hands.....and you want to sponge off both countries.

    That is very Chinese. That is, having your cake and eat it too.

    I tend to agree. I think everyone should have to choose one or the other...but that is not case and you certainly can't fault someone for doing what is best for them.

    Like we say in the US.....don't hate the player, hate the game.
    virago likes this.

  7. #37

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    Mar 2010
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    penis envy
    Penis envy is the reason feminists hate men. They are jealous of men's penises, and this jealousy gets taken out on men in the form of rage.
    feminist: I hate men!
    My friend: Why does she hate men so much?
    Me: She wishes she had a penis... She has a bad case of penis envy


  8. #38

    Chinese nationality laws do not apply in Hong Kong before 1997.


  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by juliet1968:
    Chinese nationality laws do not apply in Hong Kong before 1997.
    They didn't technically apply before the handover under British administration, but was retroactively taken into force after it.

    Regardless your statement is misleading.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hairball:
    They didn't technically apply before the handover under British administration, but was retroactively taken into force after it.

    Regardless your statement is misleading.
    Big time. Her other posts on related topics are also not very helpful.

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