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Can my PR infant son sponsor me and my wife for a visa?

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Well, race seems is such an arbitrary concept, I find it difficult to believe laws can be predicated from it.
    Hairball's guide explains the terms - it's actually "Chinese blood" - and the term used for Chinese is a pan-China term, not specifically referring to the Han ethnic group but all ethnic groups of China. So if one is Tibetan or from Inner Mongolia, that child born in HK will be a Chinese citizen with HK ROA. While one with a parent from Outer Mongolia probably would not be.

    You're right though, the whole thing is very unclear.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    I could complete understand "children of current/former PRC nationals as a definition", but "Chinese race" just sounds wrong. How can you tell someones race with certainty?
    From what I've read, what's necessary is documentary proof showing that one ancestor once had Chinese nationality. E.g. ROC or Taiwanese passports of grandparents.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Can you tell all children of Korean, Chinese or Japanese parents apart?
    Good point here. Long ago, during the 10th century or so, a group of Chinese moved into Korea and settled there. Their decendants remain in both Koreas today, and are considered fully Korean. But if one read this law too literally, perhaps one of those individuals could give birth to a child in HK who is a Chinese citizen with HK ROA?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    How about a "mixed race" child? Or the child of a mixed race child? There are plenty of "races" within China anyway.
    The OP's case sounds like a case of a mixed race child.

    Shoutout to Hairball here: CAN YOU HELP US?
    Last edited by IceEagle; 07-03-2015 at 10:18 PM.
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  2. #12

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    It is about race rather than former nationalities of the parent. There are children born to Singaporeans and Malaysians in HK who get PR & Chinese nationality. In these cases its easy to prove Chinese blood because their local documents specify the person's race on them. But if someone were a fourth generation Chinese American I guess may be bit more difficult.

    I think the reason for this is that for the handover, China only wanted to grant Chinese nationality to Hong Konger's of Chinese decent, so they have used "Chinese blood" to determine who should get it.


  3. #13

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    I think pre-1997 the HK government kept records of the residents' race, at least who is Chinese and who is not. If I remember correctly in my school days there was a local born Pakistani classmate, whose ID card number starts with "X" instead of the normal alphabets then.


  4. #14

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    If what you say is true, then it is a very racist policy. I can't really see how it can be applied though, in anything but an extremely haphazard and slapdash fashion. For every Malaysian with 'Chinese' race on their cards there are dozens of nationalities who don't have such regressive categories on their national documents.

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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by kma88:
    I think pre-1997 the HK government kept records of the residents' race, at least who is Chinese and who is not. If I remember correctly in my school days there was a local born Pakistani classmate, whose ID card number starts with "X" instead of the normal alphabets then.
    X: means do not have Chinese Name

  6. #16

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    I don't really have a clear view of this, it's just my opinion was before the PRC took over HK in 1997, there is no real way to determine whether one is a PRC citizen or not. The language in one of the interpretations is that those that have ???? (i.e. Chinese race/blood) will be taken as Chinese citizens, at least at the change of sovereignty. As for how ???? can be interpreted, that beats me.

    I do not know how they treat this in practice for any newborns in Hong Kong now. Perhaps if they look Chinese and you claim them as Chinese under the nationality field they'll just take it as that. I have no idea.

    The concept of "nationality" in the Hong Kong perspective is very clouded historically, I don't think people there have a grasp of that. They used to be administered by the British, were not part of UK, not full British citizens, most residents are Han Chinese, returned to China in 1997, etc. What also complicates is that under PRC and HKSAR policy, the Hong Kong territory always has been part of China, so they interpret things in that it was always part of China, just under British administration for 150 years. In a legal perspective, it's like China considers that its law ruled over Hong Kong even when they weren't in control of it.

    Last edited by Hairball; 13-03-2015 at 11:51 PM.
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