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Application for HKPR - 7 years with gap (discussion only)

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wdsg12:
    Oh really? So does it mean you applied PR and failed?
    No, when I can back in 2005 I had to replace my ID card with the new version and asked immigration the question then. Based on their answer I didn't apply for PR until 7 yrs after that.

  2. #12

    Many immigration departments in the world have automatic computer systems, with record of entry and departure dates, and the type of visas people were issued and the time they need to quality for things. They can easily check you qualify or not instantly without the applicants showing documents.

    7 years is long, but is good to show the applicants have a real commitment to HK.


  3. #13

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    and remember
    If you leave HKG and do not land through HKG immigration at least once in every 3 years you lose the PR status

    angeluscomplex likes this.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamco:
    and remember
    If you leave HKG and do not land through HKG immigration at least once in every 3 years you lose the PR status
    There is no such thing as PR status really. Immigration define it as Right to Abode. If you don't land in Hong Kong for three years, Right to Abode is downgraded to Right to Land. Most expats wouldn't really care about the difference - Right to Land still gives someone the right to live and work in Hong Kong.
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  5. #15

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    that is not the case
    right to land needs a sponsor as employer and can be deported
    right of abode = permanent resident, cannot be deported


  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamco:
    that is not the case
    right to land needs a sponsor as employer and can be deported
    right of abode = permanent resident, cannot be deported
    immigration website says:

    Right of Abode
    The right of abode in the HKSAR will allow a person the right:
    - To land in the HKSAR;
    - To be free from any condition of stay (including a limit of stay) in the HKSAR;
    - Not to be deported from the HKSAR; and
    - Not to be removed from the HKSAR.

    Right to Land
    If a person loses his/her right of abode in the HKSAR he/she will automatically acquire the right to land in the HKSAR in accordance with the law, which will allow he/she enjoys the right:
    - To land in the HKSAR;
    - To be free from any condition of stay (including a limit of stay) in the HKSAR; and
    - Not to be removed from the HKSAR.
    - He/She will be able to enter the HKSAR freely to live, study and work without any restriction

    right to land means employment visa/sponsorship is not required as @TheBrit said above

    here is the link:
    http://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/services/roa/term.html
    Last edited by JAherbert; 04-10-2017 at 11:31 AM. Reason: added link
    TheBrit, Mrs. Jones and SalseroHK like this.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamco:
    that is not the case
    right to land needs a sponsor as employer and can be deported
    right of abode = permanent resident, cannot be deported
    No, the bit in italics is wrong. It is a common mis-perception, but the facts are clearly stated.

    You are right about deportation, but this isn't something that enters most expats thinking. Certainly it isn't something I could care less about.

  8. #18

    True, right of abode=permanent resident

    Not true. Right to land can work like HKPR without a sponsor as employer

    Quote Originally Posted by dynamco:
    that is not the case
    right to land needs a sponsor as employer and can be deported
    right of abode = permanent resident, cannot be deported
    Most HK and Macau residents have PR status. HKPR ID cards are different from Non HKPR ID cards. Additional words are displayed on both the front and back of HKPR ID cards. All current HKPR have the right of abode in HK. Only HKPR can use the immigration counters with the red words Hong Kong Permanent Resident displayed above them. Non HKPR HK residents must use the counters with the green words Hong Kong Resident displayed.

    HKPR without Chinese nationality lose HKPR status and automatically become HK residents with Right to Land when they have left HK more than 36 months.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    There is no such thing as PR status really. Immigration define it as Right to Abode. If you don't land in Hong Kong for three years, Right to Abode is downgraded to Right to Land. Most expats wouldn't really care about the difference - Right to Land still gives someone the right to live and work in Hong Kong.
    Last edited by lighthse003; 04-10-2017 at 04:02 PM.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by lighthse003:
    True, right of abode=permanent resident
    Right to land also equals permanent resident. You not have to give your HK ID back if you are changed from Rowton RTL. You are still a permanent resident of HK in this case.

    It would be great if people who don't understand the system stopped posting and confusing the matter.

    The link posted by JAherbert sums it up succinctly.
    Fiona in HKG and Jaz Paul like this.

  10. #20

    Join Date
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    I have a piece of paper in front of me which was given to me by the friendly chap from the Immigration Department when they confirmed my PR status a few weeks ago. He called my attention to three sections of the information:

    Category of persons who acquired permanent resident status by virtue of being
    (1)A person not of Chinese nationality who has entered Hong Kong with a valid travel document has ordinarily resident in Hong Kong for a continuous period of not less than 7 years and has taken Hong Kong as his place of permanent residence before or after the establishment of the HKSAR.
    Circumstances under which the person will lose the status of a permanent resident
    If the person has been absent from Hong Kong for a continuous period of not less than 36 months since he ceased to have ordinarily resided in Hong Kong.
    Right to land
    A person who ceases to have the status of a permanent resident of the HKSAR will automatically acquire the right to land in Hong Kong in accordance with the law. He will be able to enter Hong Kong freely to live, study or work without any restrictions. A person my ascertain whether he has lost the status of a permanent resident of the HKSAR by applying for verification of eligibility for permanent identity card with the Right of Abode Section of the Immigration Department for assessment of whether he has lost the permanent resident status and has the right to land in the HKSAR.
    Pretty clear from this that Right to Land is what you get when you lose PR status - so by definition, you cannot be both PR and have Right to Land.

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