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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kma88:
    Then you better not let them know you still have a foreign passport as you were supposed to have renounced your other nationalities when taking up Chinese nationality. I am surprised that you were not required to register a Chinese name then. I would assume if I take up say Russian citizenship I would be required to translate my name into Russian.
    Do those naturalised Chinese lose their Chinese nationality if they take on another nationality/ restore their former ?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrison:
    So you have both names in your passport now? Just like on the ID card ?

    Yes, that is correct.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Morrison:
    Do those naturalised Chinese lose their Chinese nationality if they take on another nationality/ restore their former ?
    That depends on the nationality you are taking up. If they require you to renounce your current nationality (Chinese) or not.

  4. #14

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    The way I read your sentence is that a foreign gov. decides whether you should give up your Chinese nationality.

    But what I mean is that many countries have stipulated that you lose your nationality in case
    you take on another one.

    For born HK Chinese Nationals that is not the case, probably de jure or if big Xi decides so some day,
    but currently they just ignore your other nationality and regard you as Chinese national.

    So I was wondering whether naturalised HK Chinese are in a different situation when it comes to their Chinese nationality, as OP seemingly has two nationalities.

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  5. #15

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    The laws are not very clear on this (naturalised Chinese national getting another nationality afterwards) and probably requires a court case to clear up the uncertainties. I'd like to know the answer too.

    However in OP's case he probably had two nationalities but only renounced one and not declared the other one when he took up Chinese nationality. That's not allowed but if the second nationality is not obvious (e.g. not his birth country) then its difficult for the authorities to find out. I wonder if this is quite common among naturalised Chinese.

    Last edited by kma88; 09-05-2018 at 01:41 PM.
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  6. #16

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    Then let OP go and apply for a big China visa......
    ( do report back to us )


  7. #17

    I had a similar query when I naturalised as technically I am applicable for other citizenship through parents. They made me swear and declare in writing that I do not hold any other citizenship at that time - if I hadn't declared and announced these citizenship, they made clear that my naturalisation would be considered invalid.

    Similarly they made sure to highlight that under article 8 of Chinese nationality law, if I acquired citizenship of another country "under my own will", my Hong Kong naturalisation would be invalid.

    OP is sort of playing with fire on this one

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  8. #18

    Here's the line that was shared with me :

    "Article 9: Any Chinese national who has settled abroad and who has been naturalised as a foreign national or has acquired foreign nationality of his own free will shall automatically lose Chinese nationality."

    https://www.gov.hk/en/residents/immi...hinese/law.htm


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    All the white fella in my office has Chinese name on their name card, just don't call them with chinese name, they dont even know that's their name. lol.
    Just create a direct translation from ur English name, no big deal.


  10. #20

    Almost all the famous non Chinese people in both British and Post Handover Hong Kong have Chinese surnames and names, used by the Chinese language media in Hong Kong, but not always appear in their identity documents.

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