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Shenzhen to HK commute

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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwong222:
    I did not say to register after 24 hours. I said if he is not staying for longer than 24 hours then it is just not something he should really worry about. During the week, he arrives after work at night and leaves in the morning. Even the cops in China can understand that he could not register due to the opening hours of the PSB. Also if he gets checked within the 24 hours, he still hasn't done anything illegal.
    That seems like bad advice. That's what I meant by saying within 24 hours, not after. Staying less than 24 hours does not exempt from the requirement to register. If he get's checked and hasn't registered the preceding stays, that would technically be illegal. E.g. Arrive on Monday evening stay over night, leave Tuesday morning. He comes back on Tuesday evening, get's checked. Now not having registered the stay on Monday has become illegal and he still has until the 24 hour period is over to register the stay on Tuesday night.

    But you are right, in practice he might get away with it for a while. Unless he manages to annoy some nosy neighbor.

  2. #42

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    Just to add a couple of extra wrinkles (apart from visas, rapidly filling passports and commute times mentioned above) from years living in a mainland city (not SZ):

    - interpretation/ enforcement of rules and regulations can vary wildly among different police branches and districts even within the same city ... the FAP might be really accommodating while the PAP office upstairs gives every foreigner on the street the 3rd degree every time they're seen. The you move to the next door district; the PAP never patrol there, but the FAP go over your documents with a fine-toothed comb. And so it goes. This is first person experience.
    - it any branch of law enforcement wants to search your flat, the landlord, neighbourhood committee or gate guard who values their life will grant them immediate access. Got the t-shirt for this one, too.
    - the wind can change VERY quickly. You can live somewhere problem-free for years, then all of a sudden be given <24 hours to get out. Not just of the city, but out of the province, or even totally out of country. I avoided this, but literally dozens of friends and colleagues have experienced this over the past couple of decades.

    drumbrake likes this.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by chingleutsch:
    Just to add a couple of extra wrinkles (apart from visas, rapidly filling passports and commute times mentioned above) from years living in a mainland city (not SZ):

    - interpretation/ enforcement of rules and regulations can vary wildly among different police branches and districts even within the same city ... the FAP might be really accommodating while the PAP office upstairs gives every foreigner on the street the 3rd degree every time they're seen. The you move to the next door district; the PAP never patrol there, but the FAP go over your documents with a fine-toothed comb. And so it goes. This is first person experience.
    - it any branch of law enforcement wants to search your flat, the landlord, neighbourhood committee or gate guard who values their life will grant them immediate access. Got the t-shirt for this one, too.
    - the wind can change VERY quickly. You can live somewhere problem-free for years, then all of a sudden be given <24 hours to get out. Not just of the city, but out of the province, or even totally out of country. I avoided this, but literally dozens of friends and colleagues have experienced this over the past couple of decades.
    Where have you lived that had PAP (People's Armed Police) patrol or deal with foreigners at all? Xinjiang?
    No PAP roaming in Shenzhen. Overall experiences probably vary with location and your occupation, and you are right that there is a risk, but I've never encountered anything like that at all. No cops coming randomly to my apartment, (as a matter of fact, not opening my door to the census officials didn't result in anything other than them leaving), only had my passport checked once at a highway traffic check in Jiangxi. Had some cop call his buddies over at a traffic check on a highway in Inner Mongolia over ten years back, because they had never seen a foreigner drive a car, even they only wanted to see my drivers license and registration.
    Even when having a traffic accident Police in Shenzhen have never asked for my passport, only drivers license and insurance. I've only once encountered a police officer who tried to steamroll me for being a foreigner, but a trip to the traffic police and a look at the traffic cam took care of that without problems. But then, I've also never hung out with other foreigners at typical foreigner places, that alone cuts police interactions to close to zero.

  4. #44

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    Most of my time was in the wild west of Xining, but I've also spent some time in the fleshpots of Shanghai and in Zhuhai (although that last was so long ago that the Gongbei Port shopping mall hadn't been planned yet).

    mrgoodkat likes this.

  5. #45

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    Again this frog master piece strikes back, no need to register every time, especially not in Shenzhen, person have to if visa number has changed (new visa) or address.


  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by resurection:
    Again this frog master piece strikes back, no need to register every time, especially not in Shenzhen, person have to if visa number has changed (new visa) or address.
    We have already established that you have no clue about China laws, so why won't you just shut up.
    The advice was that he doesn't necessary "have" to register. He might get away with not doing it, because the local PSB can't be bothered. But it's not legal unless he has a residence permit and if he gets sweeped up in a crackdown on foreigners he'll be fined ¥2000.

    Here is legal advice from a law firm in Beijing:

    Q8: Does a foreign national need to re-register each time she returns from a trip to another city or country?

    The answer is different for a person with a visa versus a person with a residence permit.

    A person with a visa should register after each move to a new place within China (hotel, apartment, etc.) and each time she returns to a place from abroad.

    In contrast, for persons holding a valid, unexpired residence permit, the answer is not so clear:

    At the national level, instructions written by the Ministry of Public Security prior to enactment of the Exit and Entry Administration Law (and not updated since) say yes, re-registration is required. Draft regulations implementing the new law said that “a foreign national possessing a residence permit that indicates his or her place of residence need not re-register that accommodation” upon returning from another place. But that provision was deleted from the final regulations, so it’s not authoritative.
    So check your local rules. For example, the PSB in Fujian province and Guangzhou says a person with a residence permit returning to their previously registered China address need not re-register.
    https://lawandborder.com/temporary-r...ign-nationals/
    Last edited by mrgoodkat; 01-07-2020 at 07:31 PM.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgoodkat:
    We have already established that you have no clue about China laws, so why won't you just shut up.
    The advice was that he doesn't necessary "have" to register. He might get away with not doing it, because the local PSB can't be bothered. But it's not legal unless he has a residence permit and if he gets sweeped up in a crackdown on foreigners he'll be fined ¥2000.

    Here is legal advice from a law firm in Beijing:


    https://lawandborder.com/temporary-r...ign-nationals/
    You are talking crap, poor boy, can see russian or maybe german speak out of you.

    Like you have? Hahahaha posting links almost 20 years old.

    There is a residence permit for personal affairs. That's talk enough about you.
    Last edited by resurection; 01-07-2020 at 10:19 PM.

  8. #48

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    Thanks everyone. Sounds like this would be ~1.5hr commute from Shenzhen to Central.

    Would it make more sense from a commute perspective for my gf and I to live on HK side in Sheung Shui or Yuen Long for example (somewhere close to border and Futian). Or would this be just as bad for her time wise?


  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by astro1:
    Thanks everyone. Sounds like this would be ~1.5hr commute from Shenzhen to Central.

    Would it make more sense from a commute perspective for my gf and I to live on HK side in Sheung Shui or Yuen Long for example (somewhere close to border and Futian). Or would this be just as bad for her time wise?
    Would probably be better, because she could cross the border using the e-gates. But she would need a business two-way permit. The private ones are limited to one trip to HK per week.

  10. #50

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    Hi

    I do the commute everyday ; live here but work in Shenzhen ( Futian).

    With the high speed, it's totally doable especially if you manage to stay near Futian or Shenzhen north stations.

    However you want to live in Shenzhen; you cannot live / rent apartment in Shenzhen without a residence permit ( Z visa). Even you manage to make a deal with a hotel long term; it's only a matter of time before China immigration starts questioning you. And lining up for immigration / filling forms 2 times a day will be a nightmare.

    So, find a way to make your residence in China legal ; then it should be manageable.





    Quote Originally Posted by astro1:
    Hi All,

    I live and work in HK at the moment, but am looking into living in Shenzhen for personal reasons and do the commute. I hold a foreign passport and HK residence card (but not HK PR).

    I work in Central, and was wondering what's the fastest way to make the commute from Shenzhen? Is living by Futian high-speed rail station the quickest or better to live in another area in Shenzhen? Would very much appreciate if anyone who is in a similar situation to me could provide any advice. I realize Chinese border is closed to foreigners at moment - asking for the future if/when these restrictions are lifted.

    Thanks!

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