HK Permanent ID Card

Closed Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
  1. #11

    does anyone know what AFO stands for (A for Right of Abode, O or overseas born...F?)


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sarcasm - because beating the crap out of people is illegal
    Posts
    14,622
    Last edited by Claire ex-ax; 13-01-2010 at 01:09 PM.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    23,205

    On the old style cards it meant Female. The sex is shown in a separate field on the Smart Cards, and F does not appear to be a valid symbol.

    This link is more comprehensive than Claire's: http://www.smartid.gov.hk/en/faq/index.html#00ac

    Last edited by PDLM; 13-01-2010 at 01:10 PM.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sarcasm - because beating the crap out of people is illegal
    Posts
    14,622

    Pasted the wrong bookmark...


  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sha TIn
    Posts
    321
    Quote Originally Posted by shesarainbow:
    Hey, yes you are right...i checked and she has AO. Sorry my error!!
    You are right, i managed to get some sense out of my parents. Apparently they officially became UK citizens exactly the day before i was born so i just missed out on AO status, how random is that
    Does your sister's card say "***AO" or just "AO"? Also, does she travel back to Hong Kong very often? You only lose AO and obtain RO status if you've been absent from Hong Kong for more than 36 months so if she has entered Hong Kong at least once every 3 years since 1999, she still retains her ROA as a foreigner.

    If she has ***AO, then that means she has ROA on the basis of being a Chinese citizen and will never lose that status unless she submits and application to renounce her Chinese citizenship or declares a change of nationality through the HK immigration department.

    It's kind of strange how your sister can get this status because according to Chinese nationality law, if the state you were born in granted you citizenship upon birth and one or both of your parents were settled (having permanent residence aka indefinite leave to remain in the UK), she would not be granted Chinese nationality. The UK grants citizenship to children born to parents with ILR so both you and your sister obtained UK citizenship upon birth despite your parents not being British Citizens at the time.

    I guess the next time she renews her card or applies for an HKSAR passport, this will say for sure whether she's a Chinese national or not.
    Last edited by Aritaurus; 13-01-2010 at 08:37 PM.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    At an undisclosed location.
    Posts
    387
    Quote Originally Posted by Aritaurus:
    It's kind of strange how your sister can get this status because according to Chinese nationality law, if the state you were born in granted you citizenship upon birth and one or both of your parents were settled (having permanent residence aka indefinite leave to remain in the UK), she would not be granted Chinese nationality. The UK grants citizenship to children born to parents with ILR so both you and your sister obtained UK citizenship upon birth despite your parents not being British Citizens at the time.

    I guess the next time she renews her card or applies for an HKSAR passport, this will say for sure whether she's a Chinese national or not.
    I guess it also depends on when they were born, I think before the 1981 Nationality Act applied, anyone born in the UK (unless their parents were diplomats or enemy aliens) got British citizenship. Now, you need to have ILR to give your UK-born children British citizenship.

    If this was far back enough (before the 1960s), anyone who was born in Hong Kong could get a British passport and move to the UK with full residency rights - simply by virtue of their connection with Hong Kong. I'm not sure if children born to such parents are considered settled or not. (Perhaps the amount of years the parents stayed in the UK before the child was born would be important.)

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Currently in HK
    Posts
    48

    I have a question, just to clear my worries...

    I am on a dependent visa and have a hk id with CO (limited stay) on it, am I able to work in Hong Kong? I tried reading on the immigration website...and it was just confusing me...


  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sarcasm - because beating the crap out of people is illegal
    Posts
    14,622

    Yes if your dependent visa was sponsored by a Hong Kong permanent resident, someone who is not subject to a limit of stay (someone with the right to land or on unconditional stay), someone admitted for employment (as professionals, for investment to establish/join in business or for training), or someone entereing under the Capital Investment Entrant Scheme or the Quality Migrant Admission Scheme.

    It will usually state on your visa if you cannot work.


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Currently in HK
    Posts
    48

    Thanks Claire ex-ax, my sponsor is my dad who has ROA status, and just re-checked my visa, no other limitations except the period of stay =)

    Got a job offer, so just needed to make sure...


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    Exclamation

    Hi I've got a new Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card and am very worried about the status if it...

    When I applied to the immigration officer about my circumstances he told me I would need to visit Hong Kong every 3 years. On my card it says "R" with different numbers on it and it ends with "(3)"...can anyone explain these codes or symbols please?

    Basically what I am trying to ask is do I actually need to visit every 3 years to keep my status or do I come and go as I please?

    My mum and dad were born in Hong Kong and they both pocess Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card each, including my sister.

    This immigration thing is so confusing! >