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Good places to live in Hong Kong...

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    hong kong
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    99

    find an existing furnished flat looking for someone to share, you get to make friend or enemy, share a bigger flat, but you will pay less tax, a flat adds 10% to your salary but a room is about 4% of something much less, just check out the latest salary tax guide.


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    23,221
    Quote Originally Posted by m stone
    find an existing furnished flat looking for someone to share, you get to make friend or enemy, share a bigger flat, but you will pay less tax, a flat adds 10% to your salary but a room is about 4% of something much less, just check out the latest salary tax guide.
    It's a bit more complicated than that. The tax treatment of Housing Allowance that you describe requires:
    1) A proper lease (unusual if you are sub-letting someone's spare room)
    2) That your employer defines in your employment contract a housing allowance at least as big as what you actually pay
    3) Your employer "exercises control" to see that you do actually spend your housing allowance on rent (which means that you need to give them a copy of your lease and the original receipts from the lessor)
    4) The employer needs to report all this appropriately in their year end tax return related to you.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    6,196
    Quote Originally Posted by Char Siu King
    That makes no sense.
    which part? seemed pretty clear to me?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Herngju
    Chinese wok cooking tends to create a fine film of oil. It quickly builds up. If you visit many Chinese kitchens, you'll find that people try to limit the buildup by wrapping or otherwise covering the range area with cling film, aluminum foil or special sheets of coated cardboard that are sold at many stores in HK. The film is hard to avoid and the oil also spreads through the air to other parts of the house, depending on the floor plan. That's because the wok temperature is super hot for better flavor.

    You'll find that some Chinese families that move abroad and can manage it will replace their kitchen fans with Chinese ones, with much greater power, to better ventilate. There's also a cup you can pull out, that collects oil. ... Some Chinese and Vietnamese families build kitchens outdoors when they're in the U.S., because the cooking is so messy. One of my Vietnamese friend's parents cook outdoors all year long. They'll put on their coats and stir fry outdoors, lol.
    They built a lot of homes in the Westwood Plateau - Coquitlam, BC with wok kitchens just because our area has more Asians - Chinese and Korean - than locals. Many home ads in the mid 90s before the HK handover in 97 advertised home with a wok kitchen. I forget what my builder told us about if we sold how we might convert our kitchen if asked by a buyer.

    I like Sheung Wan as it close to most anything. Bad for food shopping mostly and not a late night eating spots.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    hong kong
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM
    It's a bit more complicated than that. The tax treatment of Housing Allowance that you describe requires:
    1) A proper lease (unusual if you are sub-letting someone's spare room)
    2) That your employer defines in your employment contract a housing allowance at least as big as what you actually pay
    3) Your employer "exercises control" to see that you do actually spend your housing allowance on rent (which means that you need to give them a copy of your lease and the original receipts from the lessor)
    4) The employer needs to report all this appropriately in their year end tax return related to you.
    I rented a furnished bedroom from the landlaord, sharing the other living areas all fully furnished including kitchen everything, and I arranged rental refund with employer, and I paid HK$12,000 per month.

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