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Good places to live in Hong Kong...

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Good places to live in Hong Kong...

    Hi there,

    Some advice needed. Moving to HK soon and looking around which would be the best place for me to live. My new office is located in Kowloon Bay. I don’t have to live in the thick of the action but don’t want to end up (with all due respect) in the new territories. Have a budget of around 10.000 HKD and keeping my hopes up for a furnished apartment for myself.

    Any suggestions of areas or even building complexes will be more than appreciated.

    Thanks


  2. #2

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    Oct 2010
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    For 10K, you can find anywhere between small 300-1000 sqft flat, but it will all depend on the location, age of building, state of decoration. e.t.c. HK is all in the thick of action, even new Terrorities, we seldom sleep. If you can drive (car or bike) I have heard Saikung is a nice place, though limited # of flat available.

    MTR (local train) stations that are nearby kowloonbay, have plenty of flats, but it is considered old and industrial area. once u travel in the MTR, you will know what you want. if ur budget is 10, don't say 10 to the agent. Just say, let me see what you got, my company will pay, so once I am comfortable with the place I will request my company to approve my rent budget. if they ask for a range, say, anywhere between 6-12 K..

    once they start showing you flats, you will have better idea of what's available and on what rent. good luck.


  3. #3

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    And note that fully-furnished apartments are relatively rare. Most places come with air-cons, hob, and maybe a washing machine and fridge.


  4. #4

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    Any reason you don't want to consider NT? (Have you been here, for example, and actually seen it?)

    Kowloon Bay is pretty close to the NT border in the scheme of things (in fact probably was in the NT under the 'original' definitions of anything beyond Boundary Rd, Mongkok) so you limit your options considerably if you only look South.

    Last edited by MovingIn07; 20-10-2010 at 02:32 PM.

  5. #5

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    Oct 2010
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    Hi guys,

    Thanks for your advice. Living in the Mainland for years and been plenty of times to HK, but just for a day or a weekend. So living there will be a bit different. Nothing wrong with the New Territories. I will probably end up there doing some hiking/biking etc. in the weekends. But I’m in my mid twenties and would like to enjoy the nightlife and other things the city has to offer as well. To travel every time forth an back especially on a late night is not looking that attractive for me.

    Skyhook likes this.

  6. #6

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    Oct 2010
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    many places starting after Lam Tin onwards are new. i have friends living in tseung kwan o, po lam, lohas park etc. some flats can be rented for less than 10k. i personally don't like the area, but it's clean and convenient. even if you want to be near central or hk island you can easily take MTR to be in central in around 35-40 mins.


  7. #7

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    Aug 2010
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    Sometimes you can negotiate for furniture if the landlord thinks you'd be a good tenant. I'm Chinese American, so my last landlord figured I'd keep the place better than traditional Chinese. (I don't cook, for instance, lol.) He wouldn't budge on rent, so I requested a loveseat, a sofa bed for guests, a TV and TV stand, a desk and chair, and a double bed. He bought them all new and had them delivered before I moved in. The place already had a range, fridge and washer. I signed a one-year lease and left all the furniture when I moved.

    I overheard a co-worker negotiating to rent out a flat, and she was being asked to buy furniture for a tenant as well.

    Last edited by Herngju; 22-10-2010 at 12:10 AM.

  8. #8
    bdw
    bdw is offline

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    I would suggest you look around the purple MTR line from Yau Tong to Po Lam. This will be good price, reasonably close to work in KB, and also the MTR crosses the harbour and you have good access to the nightlife of HK Island as well.

    Another option if you really want to be in the thick of things is the area between TST - Prince Edward. Its not considered a desirable area for expats, but quite a few new single tower buildings popping up which are clean and reasonably priced.


  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Herngju
    I'm Chinese American, so my last landlord figured I'd keep the place better than traditional Chinese. (I don't cook, for instance, lol.) .
    That makes no sense.

  10. #10

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    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Char Siu King
    That makes no sense.
    Chinese wok cooking tends to create a fine film of oil. It quickly builds up. If you visit many Chinese kitchens, you'll find that people try to limit the buildup by wrapping or otherwise covering the range area with cling film, aluminum foil or special sheets of coated cardboard that are sold at many stores in HK. The film is hard to avoid and the oil also spreads through the air to other parts of the house, depending on the floor plan. That's because the wok temperature is super hot for better flavor.

    You'll find that some Chinese families that move abroad and can manage it will replace their kitchen fans with Chinese ones, with much greater power, to better ventilate. There's also a cup you can pull out, that collects oil. ... Some Chinese and Vietnamese families build kitchens outdoors when they're in the U.S., because the cooking is so messy. One of my Vietnamese friend's parents cook outdoors all year long. They'll put on their coats and stir fry outdoors, lol.

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