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My guide to renting in Hong Kong

  1. #21

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiona in HKG
    "· Ask whether the agent will be retaining a spare set of keys or if you’re on your own if you lock yourself out"

    On this one I really would recommend that the first thing you do is change the lock cylinder and keep the one the locksmith takes out. That way you have control over your keys. Would you really want an agent (and who knows how many copies have been made while they had the apartment available for viewing) to have the key to your home after you move in? Or even the landlord?

    I have done this with every apartment I've let in Hong Kong. Just replace the original cylinder when you leave.
    Absolutely. The first thing you should do after you have obtained the occupancy of your rented apartment would be to change its front door's lock.

    Be sure to inform the landlord about it beforehand (No reasonable landlord will refuse), and promise to give him the new keys when your tenancy will be over.

    (And yes, if you locked yourself out during your tenancy, you are on your own.)

    There is no need to replace the original lock cylinder, to avoid the service of the locksmith. It isn't that cheap in HK.

  2. #22

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    Mar 2017
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    Thanks for taking the time to reply despite my question being a bit dumb

    It's making more sense to me now


  3. #23

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    May 2017
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    68
    Quote Originally Posted by rathunt
    My only advice for newbies is to lower your expectations and raise your budget and you will be just fine.
    Having made my living as a realtor in the West Mid-Level area for 2 years (but not anymore), I would say that a lot of the advices provided are unrealistic (or outright laughable!), especially those with regard to water and fire safety.

    [And you don't go to the "Small Claims Court (Tribunal)" if you have an issue with your tenancy, you go to The Lands Tribunal.]

    While some of you may get lucky, just have the following in mind when you hunt for housing here: You'll always get (less that) what you paid for. Don't keep your expectations high. Don't use the same standard applicable to dwellings from where you came from here... Remember the saying, "You pay peanuts, you get monkeys".

    If there is an apartment you like, most likely you will not be the only person interested. And its landlord usually is not oblivious enough to compromise with your every demand. He can always rent it to somebody else who is less picky than you are.

    I would say in 99% of the times you will NOT be able to rent anything in HK if you were to adhere strictly to those advices posted.

    Those are my advices. Take it or leave it. The same applies when you decide to rent here.
    shri likes this.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    52

    Glad they've finally made a sticky for this topic! Was beginning to wonder if GE hadn't heard of them...

    Thanks for a fairly exhaustive list of things to be aware of. Particularly the list of things to look at and test during a visit, although I'd agree the fire-water provisions would be difficult to satisfy completely, pretty sure 4/5 of my places in Asia were death traps as far as fire would've been concerned.

    Hadn't thought about changing the locks, great advice! Although I'm curious as to why anyone would hire a locksmith? Usually only call them when you need a lock picked, no? Unless there is something special about HK door locks? Are they not affixed with screws or is there a lock to lock the lock? DIY, it's about as simple as it gets!


  5. #25

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    Mar 2007
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    13,082
    Quote Originally Posted by Terreneuve
    Although I'm curious as to why anyone would hire a locksmith? Usually only call them when you need a lock picked, no? Unless there is something special about HK door locks? Are they not affixed with screws or is there a lock to lock the lock? DIY, it's about as simple as it gets!
    Whether its cats, doors, cars or doing the dishes & laundry - you are quickly going to find that HK in general does not do DIY and the few that do are very few and far in between.

    Welcome to Smelly Harbour

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    4,074
    Quote Originally Posted by locust.fund
    HDon't use the same standard applicable to dwellings from where you came from here... Remember the saying, "You pay peanuts, you get monkeys".
    You never pay peanuts in Hong Kong and that's the whole damn problem!!!
    monomono likes this.

  7. #27

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    Mar 2008
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    843

    Detailed checklist, but even as a buyer I doubt most would bother to drill into that detail. What matters usually is the price.


  8. #28

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    Dec 2017
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    This is very insightful! I heard that it's very hard to find a place to stay in HK and some just opted for very small spaces. When I get there, I wish to stay in a decent but affordable place.


  9. #29

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    Nov 2017
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    31

    One thing I would add is to particularly pay attention at how negotiations are going once you’ve made a preliminary offer. Often the attitude displayed by the landlord will be a good indicator of how things will be once you live in the place. From my own experience I find western/ised landlords much more accommodating than local ones. This is definitely a criteria for me.

    Kenneth Ho likes this.

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