View Poll Results: How large is the flat you live in (in gross sq. ft)?

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  • 1501-1600

    8 6.30%
  • 1401-1500

    6 4.72%
  • 1301-1400

    4 3.15%
  • 1201-1300

    6 4.72%
  • 1101-1200

    7 5.51%
  • 1001-1100

    4 3.15%
  • 901-1000

    10 7.87%
  • 801-900

    4 3.15%
  • 701-800

    10 7.87%
  • 601-700

    19 14.96%
  • 501-600

    15 11.81%
  • 401-500

    8 6.30%
  • 301-400

    3 2.36%
  • Less than 300

    4 3.15%
  • More than 1600

    19 14.96%
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Poll: How large is your flat (gross sq. ft)?

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  1. #81

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Mid-Levels
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    402
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom007:
    That was a castle back home I guess. That's really massive :-) :-) 2,000sqf is far above HK standard ( even I'm not an expert though) Well done indeed:-)
    Yes, many of the houses in Kuwait are crazy big. But for us the 2000 is a good size for a family of 5 plus a helper and a dog

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    15,542
    Quote Originally Posted by DeannaX:
    Yes, many of the houses in Kuwait are crazy big. But for us the 2000 is a good size for a family of 5 plus a helper and a dog
    12,000sqft equals 1,115 square meter?Yeah 2,000 is enormous; absolutely. Friend of mine lived in Red Hill. That was like 3,000 or more. Biggest single unit I have ever seen in HK. Half of a soccer team could stay there easily.

  3. #83

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,471
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom007:
    12,000sqft equals 1,115 square meter?Yeah 2,000 is enormous; absolutely. Friend of mine lived in Red Hill. That was like 3,000 or more. Biggest single unit I have ever seen in HK. Half of a soccer team could stay there easily.
    I did some stuff for a couple who rented on of the 'upside down houses' at Red Hill......she was saying how lucky they were to have found it for 100k per month....I now know she wasn't joking!!

    I guess that was 3000ish...banker husband...

  4. #84

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    Apr 2013
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    15,542

    Yeah the size 3000+ is staggering [ the rent too ] :-)


  5. #85

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    14,593
    Quote Originally Posted by INXS:
    I did some stuff for a couple who rented on of the 'upside down houses' at Red Hill......she was saying how lucky they were to have found it for 100k per month....I now know she wasn't joking!!

    I guess that was 3000ish...banker husband...
    And that must have been a while ago cos below 130k you don't get much in red hill these days.
    Last edited by Mat; 08-07-2013 at 06:33 AM.

  6. #86

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,266
    Quote Originally Posted by SiuMaiTaiTai:
    There is a growing trend for tiny homes across the US and Europe with people realising it isn't that smart to sit on large mortgages for large houses, only to feel the need to fill it up with unneeded stuff that need maintenance or upkeep.
    For me, I think 800-1000 is ideal for most families and smallness imo can help with bonding within a family and of course much quicker to clean !

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTTwzwKLZak

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYV0qATsyts
    I really agree with this, and this has been one of the most enriching aspects for me since living abroad. Going from the US --> Europe --> HK there has been a gradual downshift in living/outdoor space, and now every time I go home, I feel so overwhelmed by all the STUFF that fills up the house where I grew up (and knowing one day after my father passes away, I will have to go home and clean it up!). Now I find it so hard to image even living in a full home in the US, and I don't even want all the stuff you might collect/buy to fill up all the space. I would however like a US-size garden.

    We live in less than 400sq/ft net in HK, and I do find this a bit too small for 2 people, though. It's pretty annoying when my partner can't help prepare dinner, because only one person can be in the kitchen, or if I can't grab something out of the bathroom while he's in it. It's been good, though, to have this experience and learning how it is possible to live like this (and with less stuff!). We have managed to have a piano and other large things without cluttering the space too much, but doing so took a painful amount of time to organize. Thankfully we have a very good flat layout with a walk-in closet instead of one of those mini-HK one bedrooms.

    What I find really luxurious and nice is to have an en-suite bathroom and an extra bathroom for any potential guests.

  7. #87

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    904

    When I arrived in HK I lived in a 1,900 sq. ft. net flat, alone! I felt I needed a compass to find my way, so I moved in a 750 sq. ft gross.


  8. #88

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    4,040

    It's not so much the size I miss the most, but the privacy that goes along with it. I don't need a lot of junk, but I miss having multiple floors, basements, garages and backyards.

    I hear people saying how Hong Kong is tough on marriages...and I think most people assume that is due to work stress, long hours and infidelity issues. However, I think Hong Kong can be hard on marriages because everyone is forced to live in such tight quarters. Back home I would go to the garage to work on the car, go mow the lawn, the wife could garden or I could simply retreat downstairs to watch the ballgame. Even guests that I have come into town seem to get on my nerves faster...a result of not as much privacy and personal space.

    That was a hard adjustment for me...but now I have a much needed rooftop which helps a bit in that regard.


  9. #89

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,266
    Quote Originally Posted by closedcasket:
    It's not so much the size I miss the most, but the privacy that goes along with it. I don't need a lot of junk, but I miss having multiple floors, basements, garages and backyards.

    I hear people saying how Hong Kong is tough on marriages...and I think most people assume that is due to work stress, long hours and infidelity issues. However, I think Hong Kong can be hard on marriages because everyone is forced to live in such tight quarters. Back home I would go to the garage to work on the car, go mow the lawn, the wife could garden or I could simply retreat downstairs to watch the ballgame. Even guests that I have come into town seem to get on my nerves faster...a result of not as much privacy and personal space.

    That was a hard adjustment for me...but now I have a much needed rooftop which helps a bit in that regard.
    Actually, it's interesting that you say this now, as I'm facing a major issue with my relationship. My partner's family has no concept of "too small" to come and visit and stay with him. For me, I really need my space, especially at the end of the day, and would prefer if guests (even family) stay in a hotel, even if I have a large flat. Now that I live in less than 400sq/ft, I just can't conceive his family visiting and staying with us, especially since it hasn't gone smoothly in the past. On top of that, family coming to Hong Kong will be coming from pretty far away and will want to stay longer than a week, if not 2+. So this has created an incredible amount of tension, and on top of that, I don't know if his family will ever forgive me for setting this boundary or if I will ever be able to build a good reputation with them. It's been pretty tough. Does anyone else have this problem and found a solution?

  10. #90

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast Marina
    Posts
    17,939
    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiaque:
    Actually, it's interesting that you say this now, as I'm facing a major issue with my relationship. My partner's family has no concept of "too small" to come and visit and stay with him. For me, I really need my space, especially at the end of the day, and would prefer if guests (even family) stay in a hotel, even if I have a large flat. Now that I live in less than 400sq/ft, I just can't conceive his family visiting and staying with us, especially since it hasn't gone smoothly in the past. On top of that, family coming to Hong Kong will be coming from pretty far away and will want to stay longer than a week, if not 2+. So this has created an incredible amount of tension, and on top of that, I don't know if his family will ever forgive me for setting this boundary or if I will ever be able to build a good reputation with them. It's been pretty tough. Does anyone else have this problem and found a solution?
    If they won't move into a hotel, I suggest you do! (seriously). This could be an utter disaster. I consider less than 400sq ft barely sufficient for a couple let alone an extended family. You DO NOT have room. Period. Just say so! Where on earth are they going to sleep? Are they chinese or from some other country which often lives in small places? If so, this might be why. If they are from UK/Australia/USA or somewhere with sensible sized accomodation, you might want to let them know what 400sq ft means ("the whole flat would fit into your kitchen" for example, might do the trick!).

    If they are budget-challenged, you might offer to pay for their accomodation (if you can afford it).

    Other ideas - suggest that you "all go somewhere together to take advantage of being in Asia" - e.g. beach resort in Phils; tour of China; Phuket - anywhere really where you can all stay in Hotels and pay for your own rooms! That might reduce the squash time down to something livable.

    Failing that, I suggest an "urgent business trip" should "suddenly" be necessary right in the middle of the visit, leaving you only enough time to say "hi" when they arrive and "bye" as they leave..... (been there; done that! )
    z754103 likes this.

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