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Early termination of apartment rental - Need advice (URGENT)

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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by INXS
    You've obviously never been a landlord. Twat. Houses get themselves back onto the market by magic do they? Estate Agents are working for free are they?... Dumbass kid perspective you have.
    Oh dear. Resorting to childish name calling now are we? How embarrasing for you.

    My father had been a professional landlord for decades. Tenants skipping out is an occupational hazard that happens every now and then. It's a hassle but the costs are covered by the deposit.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by usehername
    Oh dear. Resorting to childish name calling now are we? How embarrasing for you.

    My father had been a professional landlord for decades. Tenants skipping out is an occupational hazard that happens every now and then. It's a hassle but the costs are covered by the deposit.
    Don't come the raw prawn because TheBrit backed you up. I could say 2 + 2 = 4 and he would disagree.

    Just because somebody is in business and that business has risks doesn't mean it's OK to go ahead and shaft them you prat.

    You might as well argue that it's OK to burgle homes because the owners have insurance.

    Sign a contract and honour it you bunch of good for nothing bums.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by INXS
    Don't come the raw prawn because TheBrit backed you up. I could say 2 + 2 = 4 and he would disagree.

    Just because somebody is in business and that business has risks doesn't mean it's OK to go ahead and shaft them you prat.

    You might as well argue that it's OK to burgle homes because the owners have insurance.

    Sign a contract and honour it you bunch of good for nothing bums.
    Yes- the ops friend should overstay in hk in order to continue paying the next 8 months rent. That's a brilliant idea. You are truly a genius.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by usehername
    Yes- the ops friend should overstay in hk in order to continue paying the next 8 months rent. That's a brilliant idea. You are truly a genius.
    That idea came out of your puny brain. The OP should meet with the landlord, be honest and come to a mutual agreement.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by INXS
    That idea came out of your puny brain. The OP should meet with the landlord, be honest and come to a mutual agreement.
    You said honour the contract. Coming up with a new agreement is not honouring the contract.

  6. #36

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    Well I agree with INXS that she's made a mistake by not honoring her contract, she's a grown up and committed to stay there 14 months. But when she signed her job contract, she kinda had to get an apartment in order to live here right ? She didn't expect to loose her job so quickly, and not everyone has the chance to be able to pay 8 months rent for nothing.

    When you're in your home country, most of the time you're entitled to unemployment allowances, which she obviously cannot get here in Hong Kong. So she doesn't have a choice and must go back. It's a shame for the landlord in this case, but in many other cases they're still better off renting to foreigners (every Chinese landlord I had in Mainland China preferred renting to me rather than to local Chinese) ...

    Guarantee is there to mitigate this risk.


  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by zimago
    Well I agree with INXS that she's made a mistake by not honoring her contract, she's a grown up and committed to stay there 14 months. But when she signed her job contract, she kinda had to get an apartment in order to live here right ? She didn't expect to loose her job so quickly, and not everyone has the chance to be able to pay 8 months rent for nothing.

    When you're in your home country, most of the time you're entitled to unemployment allowances, which she obviously cannot get here in Hong Kong. So she doesn't have a choice and must go back. It's a shame for the landlord in this case, but in many other cases they're still better off renting to foreigners (every Chinese landlord I had in Mainland China preferred renting to me rather than to local Chinese) ...

    Guarantee is there to mitigate this risk.
    Unemployment benefit will not go far in the UK. Why not stay in Hong Kong and look for a new job?
    chris_yang22 likes this.

  8. #38

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    1) she's not from UK, but from a country where she can get allowances if she goes back - 2) she's of course already been applying to jobs in HK for the past few weeks, but doesn't have the money to stay one more month unfortunately.


  9. #39

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    Well we all rather got het up over this one didn't we. What a surprise.

    The correct thing to do in my opinion is to contact the landlord, explain the situation and offer to pay the cost of finding a new tenant. The landlord, if reasonable, should agree to this. If, however, the landlord is NOT reasonable, then leaving while the rent is still paid and walking away from 2 months security deposit does not seem unfair to me. (Yes INXS, I own rental property too. The onus is on BOTH sides to be reasonable in any agreement, not just one.)

    While contracts should be honoured, HK rental contracts do not appear to cover well "unexpected situations" in the same way normal commercial contracts do - and the security deposit picks up the slack. If the woman cannot afford to stay here having left her job, it's bleeding obvious she cannot afford 8 months of rent so being unreasonable does not help either side.

    However - to the OP - just ASSUMING your landlord is going to be unreasonable and doing a runner without trying to sort this out first is wrong.

    Per the others, nobody can stop you moving out if your rent is paid. INXS's commercial property example may have had many different underlying factors - for example - the rent could already have been in arrears and the landlord could have obtained a judgement to take possessions in lieu of rent - if that was the case of course management would have assisted to prevent the tenant breaking the law. Commercial property rental contracts are different - much harsher than residential. You can't really use them as examples.


  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by MovingIn07
    Well we all rather got het up over this one didn't we. What a surprise.

    The correct thing to do in my opinion is to contact the landlord, explain the situation and offer to pay the cost of finding a new tenant. The landlord, if reasonable, should agree to this. If, however, the landlord is NOT reasonable, then leaving while the rent is still paid and walking away from 2 months security deposit does not seem unfair to me. (Yes INXS, I own rental property too. The onus is on BOTH sides to be reasonable in any agreement, not just one.)

    While contracts should be honoured, HK rental contracts do not appear to cover well "unexpected situations" in the same way normal commercial contracts do - and the security deposit picks up the slack. If the woman cannot afford to stay here having left her job, it's bleeding obvious she cannot afford 8 months of rent so being unreasonable does not help either side.

    However - to the OP - just ASSUMING your landlord is going to be unreasonable and doing a runner without trying to sort this out first is wrong.

    Per the others, nobody can stop you moving out if your rent is paid. INXS's commercial property example may have had many different underlying factors - for example - the rent could already have been in arrears and the landlord could have obtained a judgement to take possessions in lieu of rent - if that was the case of course management would have assisted to prevent the tenant breaking the law. Commercial property rental contracts are different - much harsher than residential. You can't really use them as examples.
    I agree with everything you've said.

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