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High rise lift wait

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    High rise lift wait

    For those of you who live in high rise apartment complexes, how long is your typical lift wait, particularly in the morning?

    Thanks


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    18,795

    80% of the time wait is less than 30 seconds, 19% of the time within 60 seconds and the remainder within 120 seconds.


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Wanchai
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    3,989

    Depends which floor it's on.


  4. #4

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    May 2015
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    I would never live in a highrise, did it once and hated it. Felt like a caged animal.

    My office is ridiculous. Around 1:00 lunch hour, it can take me 15-20 min to get back up to the office. Long lines and the usual people who ride the elevator up, only to go back down.

    I've thought about organizing a system where odd floors in the building take lunch at 12:00 and even floors at 1:00....but then I remembered I live in Asia.

    Skyhook and bookblogger like this.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Hong-Kong
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    Quote Originally Posted by Open Casket
    My office is ridiculous. Around 1:00 lunch hour, it can take me 15-20 min to get back up to the office. Long lines and the usual people who ride the elevator up, only to go back down.
    Same here. And most embarrassing when I am with clients who have to witness this.

    At home, less than 1 minute.
    Skyhook likes this.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Open Casket
    My office is ridiculous. Around 1:00 lunch hour, it can take me 15-20 min to get back up to the office. Long lines and the usual people who ride the elevator up, only to go back down.
    Why not just have lunch at other times? Or even bring your own...

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    a sunny un spoilt paradise
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    Don't think I ever saw a queue for a lift, until. I came to Hong Kong. Never even thought about lifts as a cause for irritation, again, until we moved to Hong Kong!

    And totally agree about why they can't adopt first world staggered office lunch times for staff.
    Everybody having lunch at the same time is f'd in the head.

    Hot obnoxious smelling food should be banned from being eaten in the office also, limited to only cold foods like sandwichs, salad etc. It's not professional to bring clients into your office with offensive food smells lingering around the office and being recirculated by the ducted air-conditioning system.

    Open Casket likes this.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    2,121

    Typically 30 seconds or less at home.


  9. #9

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    May 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by flameproof
    Why not just have lunch at other times? Or even bring your own...
    For the most part I do exactly as you say. However, when meeting others, it always has to be 1:00..

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook
    Don't think I ever saw a queue for a lift, until. I came to Hong Kong. Never even thought about lifts as a cause for irritation, again, until we moved to Hong Kong!

    And totally agree about why they can't adopt first world staggered office lunch times for staff.
    Everybody having lunch at the same time is f'd in the head.

    Hot obnoxious smelling food should be banned from being eaten in the office also, limited to only cold foods like sandwichs, salad etc. It's not professional to bring clients into your office with offensive food smells lingering around the office and being recirculated by the ducted air-conditioning system.
    I agree, the elevator situation here is ridiculous. I've never seen an elevator that needed a shepard to heard the people onto the lifts until I came to Hong Kong. Sure, I've seen elevator attendents before, but never people hired solely to hold lift doors and ensure maximum occupancy on each lift.

    Hong Kong office elevators are the perfect storm of congestion. High office rents, high population density and a populace that has to start work, eat lunch and end work at the same time.
    Skyhook likes this.

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