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Which flat to choose?

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by threelittlepigs
    Amazing flat, no facilities. You can always join a club with facilities. Impossible to make an average flat (eg dark, too many small rooms, odd shaped rooms, low ceilings) into a great flat.
    The club thing that goes on in Hong Kong still spins me out a bit in regard to cost, because clubs here are more about status or segregation from the poor masses, they aren't embracing of the community at large or accessible to all walks of life.

    Your post reminded me that my $130AUS annual membership fee to Home - Veneto Club is due in May, which I always pop in when I am in town, which is always nice and welcoming, with a big sense of community, thanks to a vibrant collection of demographics, not just 'professionals'....

    Don't you get tired of this Hong Kong club rubbish, some of these clubs have a Billion or more in surplus funds ie The American club for example...It's just disgusting when just under a million people in this town live in abject poverty.
    Last edited by Skyhook; 02-04-2016 at 11:27 PM.
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    Which club can you always join?
    dynasty club for example

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by cookie09
    dynasty club for example
    Then all you have to do is schlep over to wan chai every time you want to throw your kids in the playroom for half an hour. It's not really the same thing unless you live right on the doorstep of the club.
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  4. #14

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    We've lived in NYC and London and no one has indoor playrooms in apartments there. Doesn't a big apartment (1200 sq ft plus) make up for it? Can make a spare room into a playroom?

    Pool harder to find but maybe could join Parkview or a hotel.

    Ugh I like both a lot.

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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    Then all you have to do is schlep over to wan chai every time you want to throw your kids in the playroom for half an hour. It's not really the same thing unless you live right on the doorstep of the club.
    Or, just send them out to go and play in the nearby creek....

    Having facilities in the same gated community is very convenient and gives a very high level of feeling safe.

    Local facilities such as swimming pools, rowing, cycling, walking, climbing, hockey (field & ice), soccer, rugby, Aussie rules, cooking classes, pottery, painting etc are all not that far away in reality. Perhaps a concern with having great facilities is you stop looking for other things that may better suit your child and just take the easy option of a pool and a playroom.

    I would still suggest go for bigger living space and explore what the city has to offer for outside activities - Cantonese classes a couple of times a week should be a must...

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast

    Local facilities such as swimming pools, rowing, cycling, walking, climbing, hockey (field & ice), soccer, rugby, Aussie rules, cooking classes, pottery, painting etc are all not that far away in reality. Perhaps a concern with having great facilities is you stop looking for other things that may better suit your child and just take the easy option of a pool and a playroom.

    I would still suggest go for bigger living space and explore what the city has to offer for outside activities - Cantonese classes a couple of times a week should be a must...
    Do you have kids easty?

    For the facilities, I'm talking about young children, toddlers - not school age children. I think most parents would understand what I am getting at. Suggesting rugby and ice hockey for two year old and intimating parents who don't seek these out are 'taking the easy route' just makes you sound like an idiot to be honest.

    As for learning Cantonese as a must - I don't think so. Will be the right option for some, and not for others. There are no musts!
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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    For the facilities, I'm talking about young children, toddlers - not school age children. I think most parents would understand what I am getting at.
    you are right but they soon grow up...

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    As for learning Cantonese as a must - I don't think so. Will be the right option for some, and not for others. There are no musts!
    There are no musts. But living in a place with another language spoken on the streets does allow immersion in a language that probably just helps with with becoming adaptive in life. Being adaptive seems like a 'must' in the modern world. But there are no musts in life
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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    Do you have kids easty?

    For the facilities, I'm talking about young children, toddlers - not school age children. I think most parents would understand what I am getting at. Suggesting rugby and ice hockey for two year old and intimating parents who don't seek these out are 'taking the easy route' just makes you sound like an idiot to be honest.

    As for learning Cantonese as a must - I don't think so. Will be the right option for some, and not for others. There are no musts!
    My kids are 6 and 8 and if it wasn't for the dog we'd have moved to Agean Coast in February...you can have dogs there...but no!

    Hopping in the lift and going downstairs for a swim, play badminton, ping pong or whatever...we've been and looked around and to be honest, apart from going to work many of the apartments around here remind me of many resorts we've stayed in...

    I love my sons to bits but sometimes when I'm trying to work and the little one is wittering about bloody Minecraft or something...most of these apartment blocks have little quiet areas where one can 'chill' with the laptop or......a book! :-)
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    you are right but they soon grow up...
    They do but living in a place with facilities does not preclude one from using others facilities. The OP's child is presumably under one year old, and most rental contracts last two years with a break after one.


    Quote Originally Posted by East_coast
    But living in a place with another language spoken on the streets does allow immersion in a language that probably just helps with with becoming adaptive in life. Being adaptive seems like a 'must' in the modern world. But there are no musts in life
    I think it depends on the time frame you expect to spend in HK. Many expats are here on a transient basis, for a few years. Learning Cantonese probably takes a second or third seat behind the native tongue, English.. and probably even Mandarin these days.

    On the playroom/swimming pool thing vs the activities you mentioned - they are used for completely different things anyway. You don't just decide to go and play a game of rugby, or attend a cooking or pottery class. You need to schedule these things in advance, plan for them.

    For facilities in the building, you can just decide to jump in the pool with five minutes notice on a hot day... or if it is a raining cats and dogs having a playroom where the kids can blow off steam is good. One is unplanned, unstructured play - the other is scheduled activities.

    We do both, as I guess most parents do. Both are important, but my view is they are not really substitute activities - more complementary.

  10. #20

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    I would probably go for the amazing flat - but a lot would depend on the neighbourhood. How close would you be a good urban park (whether HK or Yuen Long or some other one makes no difference) or country park access, or beach? With at least one of the above within 3-year old walking access (accompanied, of course; it's just that you don't want to have him/her whining about being tired if you have an even smaller one in the stroller), the amazing flat would be a no-brainer.
    But kids are adaptable; it's we adults who gravitate to the Easy Life, so if that is important to you, go for the facilities.


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