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Yet another panicky inbound expat

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    Of course, it's part of tradition.

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  2. #12

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    Is English your second language? No nice way of phrasing that.


  3. #13

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    If you name the company here, the forum can respond with their current and maybe even future office locations.


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by civil_servant
    That's nonsense. Expats pay more for green space, higher living standards, and due to proximity to work location. Reason being that they enjoy a higher socio-economic status as a large segment of them come from the wealthy class of other nations. It's not their goal to isolate themselves from locals. The irony in all of this is that some 'expat' areas have actually been established for longer than some of the 'local' areas. Does that mean that 'local' areas isolated themselves from the established 'expat' areas? No, it doesn't. I have friends whose families have been in Hong Kong for more than 150 years, yet they're not being called 'local' due to their ethnic origins. Meanwhile all those refugees and their offspring, who came here in the 50s to 70s from China all get the privilege of calling themselves 'local' according to guys like @East_coast. @East_coast, the only divisions that are happening here come from commentators such as you.
    Not an excuse, but HK is not exactly known as a melting pot compare to, say, the US. I have Asian-American friends whose families have been in the US (California, specifically), since the late 1800s...yet they've often been asked the where (what country) are you from? question.
    Last edited by bunko8; 21-12-2016 at 02:48 AM. Reason: word spacing

  5. #15

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    Mar 2016
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    Let's remain on topic for the OP...

    Have a look at websites such as https://www.spacious.hk/en/hong-kong, Rent / Lease Homes - Squarefoot - Hong Kong Apartments, Homes, Real Estates for Rent and of course geoexpat. Unless you want to live in a studio or a shoebox, you'll be looking at about $20k+ for HK Island. Agree with other posters to stay in temporary accommodation first, it'll give you time to find a neighbourhood you like and want to settle in. Most leases here are for two years and hard/expensive to get out of.


  6. #16

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    Jun 2011
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    You can afford to pay for a serviced apartment for 3-6 months, that will give you time to settle and decide where to live. It's much better than trying to sit at your computer in the states and decide where to live. Boring answer, but I believe its the best. Myself I wrote a lot here before moving out and did a lot of research at my computer. In the end it was not worth that much in comparison to on-the-ground seeing apartments and neighborhoods.


  7. #17

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    Oct 2016
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    Op should keep in mind he is going to potentially owe state and federal US taxes. If you earn more than 115k USD, you will owe federal taxes and with you keeping your house you will owe state as well (assuming you currently live in a state that collects income tax).


  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4EverEndeavour
    I see this whole thing as a chance to experience something that most people may not be awarded, I am 42 next year, single and bringing over no kids. I don't have any intention to 'live it up' but I really want to immerse myself into the culture of what HK provides. I am willing to pay a little bit more in rent to be in an area that encourages that.

    I moved here from the states at 44, but with a wife (HK born) and our kid. So, similar, but also different.
    In any case, getting to the heart of the matter:

    i see a ton of gweilo guys here dating women they couldn't've dreamed of scoring with back home. i've got no practical tips for you in this regard, but i do think you should go ahead and set your sights a little higher.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by bunko8
    Not an excuse, but HK is not exactly known as a melting pot compare to, say, the US. I have Asian-American friends whose families have been in the US (California, specifically), since the late 1800s...yet they've often been asked the where (what country) are you from? question.
    Actually that proves the point that US is not a melting pot as you claim.

  10. #20

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    Oct 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Loblaw

    i see a ton of gweilo guys here dating women they couldn't've dreamed of scoring with back home. i've got no practical tips for you in this regard, but i do think you should go ahead and set your sights a little higher.
    Yeah, "aim higher" for a gold digger who wants an expat package, white kids and a foreign passport.

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