What do flat and flat share mean?

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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by clip_my_wings
    its beggars the question why they are actually called "flats"? considering the building in question is actually a high-rise of more than one floor it would appear the building is in fact quite the opposite to flat ? im not surprised our american brothers ae somewhat confused

    I suggest we start looking for "Tall" shares or "Long" Shares si as to provide more clarity
    I think it is because they are (typically) only one floor, hence all on one level or 'flat'...

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by clip_my_wings
    its beggars the question why they are actually called "flats"? considering the building in question is actually a high-rise of more than one floor it would appear the building is in fact quite the opposite to flat ? im not surprised our american brothers ae somewhat confused

    I suggest we start looking for "Tall" shares or "Long" Shares si as to provide more clarity
    It's from Old English via Old Norse, flet, meaning floor or dwelling, from Germanic flatjam, meaning to make flat (or level).

    So, to make a house you would flatten the ground, and that action became synonymous with 'dwelling', and the usage was transferred onto multi-storey buildings.
    Last edited by Sigga; 19-12-2008 at 10:05 AM.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by clip_my_wings
    its beggars the question why they are actually called "flats"? considering the building in question is actually a high-rise of more than one floor it would appear the building is in fact quite the opposite to flat ? im not surprised our american brothers ae somewhat confused

    I suggest we start looking for "Tall" shares or "Long" Shares si as to provide more clarity
    "beggars the question"...?

    Anyway, the word flat comes from the Anglo-Saxon word flett which means floor.

  4. #24

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    Herewith, I have to decided to exercise my right to boast of mine own excellence.

    I got my explanation in some minutes before Claire, and it was of considerably greater depth and integrity.

    I request in the name of sacred Pedantry that she publicly submit to my brilliance and virile fruitfulness.



  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigga
    Herewith, I have to decided to exercise my right to boast of mine own excellence.

    I got my explanation in some minutes before Claire, and it was of considerably greater depth and integrity.

    I request in the name of sacred Pedantry that she publicly submit to my brilliance and virile fruitfulness.


    Don't hold your breath!

  6. #26

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    The Old Norse word is flat as in flat, even.

    Flet is found in Beowulf and means house-room.

    Last edited by Claire ex-ax; 19-12-2008 at 10:48 AM. Reason: Trying to 'out-pedant' Sigga... :D

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire ex-ax
    The Old Norse word is flat as in flat, even.

    Flet is found in Beowulf and means house-room.
    I'll blithely accept that as proof of my brilliance, but I really would prefer a rather more comprehensively rendered account of my virile fruitfulness.


    Waiting...
    Last edited by Sigga; 19-12-2008 at 10:59 AM. Reason: Not pedantic enough the first time

  8. #28

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    And now the phrase "virile fruit" is going to be stuck in my head all day. Ugh!


  9. #29

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    The first known example of the word 'flat' meaning 'apartment' is in Sir Walter Scott's Redgauntlet in 1824.

    'What business has he to upbraid us,' I said, 'with the change of our dwelling from a more inconvenient to a better quarter of the town? What was it to him if we chose to imitate some of the conveniences or luxuries of an English dwelling-house, instead of living piled up above each other in flats? Have his patrician birth and aristocratic fortunes given him any right to censure those who dispose of the fruits of their own industry, according to their own pleasure?
    Extra brownie points for a quote from Redgauntlet which includes "flats" and "fruits"?

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire ex-ax
    The first known example of the word 'flat' meaning 'apartment' is in Sir Walter Scott's Redgauntlet in 1824.



    Extra brownie points for a quote from Redgauntlet which includes "flats" and "fruits"?
    I hope the floorboards don't squeak as I back away quietly - you win!



    - jgl: virile fruit virile fruit virile fruit virile fruit virile fruit!

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