Move to HK - checklist before arrival in HK?

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  1. #1

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    Jul 2010
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    Move to HK - checklist before arrival in HK?

    Hi,

    I will be moving to work in HK in a few weeks time and was wondering if anyone could help or point me in the right direction in terms of getting a checklist or putting to-do list together?

    I pretty much start work as soon as I get to HK so I want to get as much done now (preparation wise) before I move to HK.

    I have a HK permanent identity card, so hopefully that helps a bit when I'm in HK and opening bank accounts, renting serviced apartments etc

    So far, I have a list of domestic tasks to do before I go - settling the mobile phone contract, gym membership, health fund membership, car insurance etc and also a list of things to bring with me to HK (including important ID and documents)

    Now in terms of HK, I'm sure there is more to add to the checklist apart from opening a bank account (which I can't do until I get to HK I think). At the moment, I'm struggling to think of what else to do to prepare for the move to HK.

    Anyway help would be greatly appreciated, I will continue checking the forums here for any posts with a similar question to mine.

    Thanks!


  2. #2

    Join Date
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    I'm in the exact same boat as you. Here are a couple of things I've scribbled down on my To-Do List.

    In current location:
    -Safe deposit box for documents/objects that need not travel to HK.
    -Change all forwarding addresses you can manually on bank accounts, insurance, etc. that are managed online.
    -Leave forwarding address with postal service for all other mail.
    -Ask that your landlord pick up any mail that may be delivered on accident during transition period.
    -Buy a Skype Online telephone number in your current country if you want friends/colleagues there to be able to dial a "home" number and reach your mobile in HK (using the Skpye Online number forwarding service)
    -If renting, arrange with landlord to have your deposit check reach you in the most efficient manner.
    -Buy things you can't live without or luxuries you'd like to have in HK. I've heard little things like razors and such are extremely expensive in HK and they are small enough to buy some extra to ship/pack.

    In HK
    -Have new business cards printed (English/Chinese).
    -Buy Octopus card and register for rewards.
    -Buy some basic pieces of furniture (i.e. from Ikea) to hold you over until yours arrive.
    -Make time to do the things outside of work and meet people. I heard this over and over . . . the number one factor for ex-pats to be successful is for the person (and family) to be happy.

    Good luck.


  3. #3

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    Jul 2010
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    Hi huja, thanks very much for the reply.

    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    -Buy a Skype Online telephone number in your current country if you want friends/colleagues there to be able to dial a "home" number and reach your mobile in HK (using the Skpye Online number forwarding service)
    I will definitely looking into Skype as a friend mentioned this is the cheapest way for IDD calls compared to calling from a mobile

    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    In HK
    -Have new business cards printed (English/Chinese).
    -Buy Octopus card and register for rewards.
    -Buy some basic pieces of furniture (i.e. from Ikea) to hold you over until yours arrive.
    -Make time to do the things outside of work and meet people. I heard this over and over . . . the number one factor for ex-pats to be successful is for the person (and family) to be happy.
    I already have an Octopus card, just need to register it for rewards.

    I intend to move into a temporary serviced apartment for the initial first 2 months before searching for an apartment for long term rent.

    I'm still undecided whether to rent a furnished or unfurnished apartment but will definitely not be shipping any furniture etc over to HK, so everything will be bought in HK.

    In regards to networking and meeting new people, this is something lower down in the to-do list as my initial goal will be to get settled in to HK and to the new job. I will be in HK on my own initially and my partner should relocate in 2-3 months.

    One question on bank accounts - is this something we can plan ahead for (ie getting all the right supporting documents) before going to HK?
    Are you going to open the bank account when you get to HK? I was told you need several supporting documents (work, tenant details etc)

    Thanks and best of luck with your move!

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Openrice:
    I will be in HK on my own initially and my partner should relocate in 2-3 months.
    As an aside, does your partner also have the right of abode (or right to land) in Hong Kong?

  5. #5

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    I opened a HSBC account in the US and they are facilitating the opening of a HK HSBC account for me right now. I don't yet have my HK ID so we'll see if there are any delays. There is a good thread/pole on banks here on GeoExt with some good info. One of the post says you need either a HKID or passport to open an account. I'm not sure if that means HK passport (is there such a thing?) or the passport of you home country.


  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    As an aside, does your partner also have the right of abode (or right to land) in Hong Kong?
    PDLM,

    No she does not, hence why she will be looking to get a work-sponsored Visa before arriving in HK.

    If she is unable to find a role before arriving in HK, is it still possible for her to come over and look for a job in HK or will she need to apply for a working holiday Visa or something similar?

    Thanks

  7. #7

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    In practice she can come here on a Visitor Visa and look for a job. A Working Holiday Visa is possible if she is under 30 and a citizen of Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Japan, Canada or Germany. The Quality Migrant Admission Scheme is also a possibility if she meets the requirements.

    If you are male then you could also get married and she would get a Dependant Visa.

    Last edited by PDLM; 25-07-2010 at 12:28 PM.

  8. #8

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    Jul 2010
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    Thanks PDLM. I think her preference is very much to have a job secured before moving over. My partner is under 30 and is an Australian citizen.

    I will look into the requirements for a working holiday Visa as well as the Quality Migrant Admission Scheme.

    I am Male but we do not intend to get married for the purpose of the Visa status.


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    about the bank account. You need proof of address to register the bank account, but this doesnt need to be from hk. E.g. My hong kong hsbc bank account was registered in my british address, but with a hk correspondence address. So make sure you bring proof of address from your home country and it'll be easier to set up a bank account. I think a bank statement and utility bill will do the tric, but just bring a few documents you think might be useful, and check the bank's website.
    Posted via Mobile Device

    ps it's ok to use your overseas passport to open a bank account too, i used my british one

    Last edited by justjoe86; 25-07-2010 at 04:02 PM.

  10. #10

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    Jul 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    I opened a HSBC account in the US and they are facilitating the opening of a HK HSBC account for me right now. I don't yet have my HK ID so we'll see if there are any delays. There is a good thread/pole on banks here on GeoExt with some good info. One of the post says you need either a HKID or passport to open an account. I'm not sure if that means HK passport (is there such a thing?) or the passport of you home country.
    Thanks huja. I will look into the conditions around opening a HSBC account here in Australia and see if I can do the same with transitioning/facilitating that local account into a HK HSBC account to save me the hassle when I get to HK.

    My concern was more around having proof of residential address, no problem if its one from Australia, but since I'm yet to find an apartment to rent, I do not have a HK residential address yet to provide.

    Out of curiosity, do you mind me asking if you are initially moving into a serviced apartment before searching locally for an apartment to rent?

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