US-HK Power Converters

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hong Kong
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    23,207
    Quote Originally Posted by MotoHK:
    A power strip or surge protector wont do you any good for dirty power. What you need is a line conditioner that will stabilize the current.
    A line conditioner will stabilise the voltage and the frequency. The current is a function of whatever equipment you have connected. The fuse mentioned by penguinsix does not, as you rightly point out, do anything for voltage and frequency fluctuations - it simply "blows" when more than its rated current is drawn through it. This is normally because of a fault in the terminal equipment and the fuse is designed to protect both the rest of wiring and anyone who might be in contact with the malfunctioning device. It is not there to protect the device itself.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Midlevels / USA (MD) / London
    Posts
    2,217
    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    You have asserted this before, but can you provide any evidence? The Supply Rules of the HongKong Electric Company, here: http://www.heh.com/NR/rdonlyres/F98E...le_en_2005.pdf specify that under normal conditions the supply is 220V +/- 6% and 50Hz +/- 1%.

    The statutory limits in, for example, the UK are 230V +10%/-6%.

    I have never had any problems with any electrical equipment here at all.
    I stated it before and actually asked some people who agreed. I didn't bring my voltage measuring equipment with me, but have suffered a abnormally high number of device failures while in HK. The one device I did have that had surge alarms tripped frequently indicating spikes. Even some things that I purchased in HK, such as a flat screen LCD TV, experienced some glitches that I was told were attributable to power fluctuations.

    Now it might have been my building, or just a spate of bad devices (it happens, I know) but I seem to recall some others posting similar experiences. While I appreciate the regulations call for a consistent supply, I would be interested in hearing other people's experiences with the dips and spikes. Maybe it is just an urban legend that I've been spreading, or maybe others are having similar problems.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Midlevels / USA (MD) / London
    Posts
    2,217
    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    A line conditioner will stabilise the voltage and the frequency. The current is a function of whatever equipment you have connected. The fuse mentioned by penguinsix does not, as you rightly point out, do anything for voltage and frequency fluctuations - it simply "blows" when more than its rated current is drawn through it. This is normally because of a fault in the terminal equipment and the fuse is designed to protect both the rest of wiring and anyone who might be in contact with the malfunctioning device. It is not there to protect the device itself.
    Carrying on on this line, would you recommend something like a battery back up with surge protection for more sensitive devices, or is a line conditioner better? I don't know if a line conditioner is needed for say a curling iron, but providing a more stable flow to some of my machines is definitely something I'd be interested in.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by jillelissa:
    Thank you all so much. This is super helpful!! I will buy a new cord for my laptop over there, and the only electronics I am bringing are mobile. My BB and cell phone are both GSM QUAD, and the cell is really only for home emergencies, so they don't have to call a Hong Kong number. I plan on buying one of those prepaid jobbers when I get there. I will bring the brick that I was clearly "tricked" into buying, but will probably abandon it there. Again, thank you all so much! I really feel this forum is a huge asset to relocaters.
    Dont buy a prepaid jobber (phone card?). You can prob get it here. I have an ATT one from Best Buy and found out it is OK for intl outbound from the US but not outbound from here (or any intl location) to the US. They got cards here but I would suggest using Vonage (would get it there) or Skype (download) if the place you are staying at has broadband. Return the brick. Insist on a refund. If you have to say sparks were coming out of it and you dont feel safe with the product. They will give you your money back if you say its due to saftey. You can get a SIM card for your cell here cheap $48HK for 400 something mins so should be sufficient.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by penguinsix:
    Carrying on on this line, would you recommend something like a battery back up with surge protection for more sensitive devices, or is a line conditioner better? I don't know if a line conditioner is needed for say a curling iron, but providing a more stable flow to some of my machines is definitely something I'd be interested in.
    If youa are running a server at a financial institution where realiability is critical and your equipment costs 10 of thousands then you get a line conditioner. Or if you are traveling to say a third world country where the power is really bad. I dont think you need it but some retail versions are two in one. Jsut remember the battery is like a car battery. Must weigh 10 lbs. If you have to pick one or the other I woould go with the line conditioner. APC makes the best but you can get a Tripplite brand.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by penguinsix:
    I stated it before and actually asked some people who agreed. I didn't bring my voltage measuring equipment with me, but have suffered a abnormally high number of device failures while in HK. The one device I did have that had surge alarms tripped frequently indicating spikes. Even some things that I purchased in HK, such as a flat screen LCD TV, experienced some glitches that I was told were attributable to power fluctuations.

    Now it might have been my building, or just a spate of bad devices (it happens, I know) but I seem to recall some others posting similar experiences. While I appreciate the regulations call for a consistent supply, I would be interested in hearing other people's experiences with the dips and spikes. Maybe it is just an urban legend that I've been spreading, or maybe others are having similar problems.
    Come to think of it the bat on my lappy freaked out in HK. From 2 + hours to 25 min of juice nowadays.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    185

    You can also get a voltage meter from the HK equivalent of a Radio Shack. It has a guage that will show you if the voltage is stable and if the needle moves then there is a fluctuation. Has bands so you can tell whether the fluctuation is too much. Also you may be suffering from improper grounding at your place. There are devices to measure/test for that too. Just a light that shows differnt colors. The better surge protectors and conditioners have that built in but you might want to buy the tester instead first as only an electrician can correct improper grounding.


  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    A line conditioner will stabilise the voltage and the frequency. The current is a function of whatever equipment you have connected. The fuse mentioned by penguinsix does not, as you rightly point out, do anything for voltage and frequency fluctuations - it simply "blows" when more than its rated current is drawn through it. This is normally because of a fault in the terminal equipment and the fuse is designed to protect both the rest of wiring and anyone who might be in contact with the malfunctioning device. It is not there to protect the device itself.
    Nice writeup.

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