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2.5 weeks to go, help!! How did you cope when you first moved?

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,080

    I only had 20 quid. So there!


  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Pampanga, Philippines
    Posts
    26,993

    There were 20 of us living in a paper bag in middle t'road. Dad used to work 25 hours a day down pit then come home and slice us in two with a bread knife. You try telling the young 'uns of today and they just freak out.

    bookblogger likes this.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    410
    Quote Originally Posted by shri:
    Bookblogger: Watch this video. Ignore the bit at 1:10

    that was freakin hilarious! watched it over and over again. when freaking out means shoving a remote control up your ass...

    thanks for sharing

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    410
    Quote Originally Posted by peach_ blossom:
    Hi all

    I'm starting to freak out about my move to HK and I need some advice on how to stop freaking out!!!!! I'm so nervous. I know it's only for a short period initially but I want to make the most of my time in HK rather than spend most of the time being homesick. How did you first cope when you moved to HK?
    shouldn't you be more excited rather than being nervous and freaking out. what's you reason for moving anyway.

    visiting a new place is always exciting for me. nothing nerve-racking about it

  5. #15

    How did I cope? Seems like the way many expats/movers to HK first do - copious amounts of alcohol in Wan Chai/LKF/Ashely Road. Very mature, I know. I'm all setteld in now


  6. #16

    I'm in the same boat, heading out there in 3 weeks to start a new job... bit aprehensive at the mo, where do I go for that, how do I do this sort of stuff.... Its really a case of grab the bull by its horns really.. from what I saw a few weeks ago, It's still very westernised.. All part of the adventure really! But I'm guessing when I first walk out of the airport I'll be going - OMG what have I done!


  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    340

    Ain't nothing to worry about. Focus on the positive things you know and not the unknowns. Make it a positive experience. Only you can do that.

    Welcome!


  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by bruceybonus:
    , It's still very westernised.. All !
    Where did you go? Central only? Certainly overall, it's an easier place for a Westerner to adjust to than say SE Asia (minus Singapore), but to say it's 'westernized' is just missing the point. Although at first glance things in areas like Central may seem 'western', much of the attitudes, traditions, and mentalities of 90% of the people are deeply rooted in Chinese culture, not the West. Overall if you think of the 7 million people living here, it's a melting pot - leaning much more towards all things Chinese/Asian (which is a huge generalization in itself) than anything Western.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    8,561

    hk is NOT a melting pot in any sense of the word. 95% of the population is chinese. that does not make a melting pot. HOWEVER, there are enough "western" folks here that you will find most things are available. you'll see a mcd's and a 7-11 on every street corner, but what they stock/sell may be completely different.

    but that's kind of the point of relocating overseas, isn't it??? if you wanted things to be just the same old, same old then you'd stay home.

    Char Siu King likes this.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Gulf Region, ex Mid-Levels
    Posts
    1,933

    I must admit in my case my parents (when I was a kid) were expats in Saudi and Prague (just post berlin wall coming down), so I thought by comparison Singapore and HK were pretty easy.

    Sorting out some immediate issues on arrival and beforehand like a flat, mobile phone, bank account will keep you busy in the first few days as will getting to know your new colleagues. After that exploring restaurant bars and sports clubs should start getting you into the swing of things.

    Expats, even the British ones, are far more open and willing to chat to total strangers than they would back home (e.g. the London tube, when working, seems to be a bastion of silence and avoiding eye contact).


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