should i be worried about the smog?

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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    19

    should i be worried about the smog?

    My family and I are moving to HK in summer 2007, i have 2 boys and one is asthmatic and also has a number of allergies such as peanut and dust mite - i'm worried that i could be damaging his health by coming over - we'll be living in The Peak and boys will be hopefully going to Peak School - How worried should I be about the Smog - Is there any advice out there for me? Please Help.


  2. #2

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    Aug 2005
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    Sham Tseng
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    I have asthma and allergies inc. dust and pollen and have found both considerably better here despite the pollution however I personally wouldn't choose the Peak for 2 reasons 1. It is quite green which on one hand is a luxury but with allergies may not be great and 2. It gets really damp up there sometimes with whole days of fog not to mention the smog. From what I've heard you would need to run dehumidifiers 24/7 but I don't live there so seeking other opinions would be wise.


  3. #3

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    Jan 2003
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    In the Lair of the Village Idiot's Apprenctice
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    what me worry?

    from our Chief Executive yesterday.

    We have seen dramatic media reports lately about people at big companies fleeing Hong Kong's nasty air for cleaner cities in the region. While I am fully aware that we need to improve our air quality, I also think we have to keep the problem in perspective.

    In terms of the quantity of air pollutants, Hong Kong ranks at neither the top nor the bottom of the world table. Rather, we are at a level comparable with such cities as Tokyo, Seoul, Barcelona and Los Angeles. Meanwhile, foreign investment continues to pour into our city. Unlike others, we do not try to attract trade and investment by offering special tax, land or financial incentives. We believe that Hong Kong's best incentive lies in the quality of our overall business environment.


    -----
    http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/general/2...0611270129.htm


  4. #4

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    May 2006
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    on the road again
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    If you can afford it, try to live as far down south of the island as you can... my husband + kids have asthma, and we find the air down here much nicer than uptown... and don't worry about transport, many kids around here take the school bus to the peak school, it's not that far...

    Places to look at : from order of closest to town to farthest : Repulse bay, South bay, Chung Hom Kok, Stanley, Tai Tam. I'm told Tai Tam is the least polluted of the island. There are flats there in the 50-80K mark, in the Manhattan and Pacific View buildings, filled with expat families. And those buildings have good facilities, and shuttles to go into town.


  5. #5

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    Aug 2006
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    Given how things have been developing for the past four years in particular, I think pretty much all of us should be worried about the smog, it is threatening to make this wonderful city really ugly and unhealthy.

    Check out the Hong Kong Observatory statistics about reduced visibility:

    http://www.hko.gov.hk/cis/statistic/...tatistic_e.htm


  6. #6

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    Aug 2006
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    Hong Kong
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    This puts Mr. Tsang's comments above in perspective:

    http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/11/.../edbowring.php

    Why the inaction by an administration that claims to be decisive? It is partly the inertia of a bureaucracy unwilling to admit its own failings. But more important are the links between the administration and the business interests that resist effective action. These are the businessmen who dominate the political structure and provide the chief executive with much of his political support. Their companies offer highly paid cushy jobs to retiring senior officials.

    (...)

    The bottom line of Hong Kong's situation is that the chief executive is beholden to Beijing when it comes to politics, and on other matters, to a local elite. There is a direct connection between the lack of representative government and inertia in fighting pollution.


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    31

    My allergy improved when I returned to HK from Nevada and Wisconsin. The allergy was worse when I lived in Melborne and Brisbane. Again, the problem was in better control when I moved back to Hong Kong. The dry wheather actually could be a factor of asthma but in Hong Kong its humidity actual ease the problem. In HK, I can choose how often to turn on the dehumidifier. But in those locations with dry weather, I need humidifier but I wouldn't recommend to use this kind of applianc because itself can be a source of germs. I guess my allergy is less of the air pollution but more specific to dust mites, pollens and molds. So far I figure out what suits me best is to avoid living in the areas with green (avoid the pollens), avoid low floor and old building (must be no false ceiling and no carpet) and only go for the top top floors of newly developed high rise in the metro area with lots of windows.

    Last edited by Max Jian; 03-12-2006 at 10:15 AM.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    31

    Oh Appless, I forget to tell. If you go for brand new developed apartment or you move into a place that is just renovated, you have to make sure the charged dust on the wall, floor and cabinets are removed before your children moved in. I found a very good cleaning paper that trapped those charged dust (very attached to the surface) and you can hire a maid to do those cleaning for you before you move in. Let me know if you need help.