Expat cost of living

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    130

    pls tell me where to watch spurs


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    48

    Bubble

    I think I just have low tolerance to those who cough without covering their mouths, or bump into me and don't apologise or something like that.

    It happens everywhere. I notice these things but may be it depends on each individual if they can look over this issue or not.

    We live in Mid-level and I don't think moving up to the Peak will solve this problem because we still have to go out and about...

    I do miss my Kensington sometime, even though when we lived there, we were annoyed with shoppers during the weekend but if they bump into me, they apologise and they don't cough in my face.

    We didn?t come to Hong Kong for better money or lifestyle, so we have low tolerance or perhaps have too high expectation.


  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sai Kung
    Posts
    8,561

    or perhaps what YOU consider good manners and what a local person considers good manners are completely different....you know, different culture and all that stuff that accompanies moving half way around the world.

    and just so you know, there are just as many rude "englishmen" as there are rude chinese people. you just notice it more here.

    (ps. it annoys me when i hold the door open and 35 people walk through and no one says thank you, but i get over it. it happens everywhere.)


  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    on the road again
    Posts
    927

    I just wanted to say that I wear contacts and don't have any problems with them whatsoever... and also that I think the MTR is way cleaner that the tube (and way way way more clean than the parisian metro)!
    I also find that chinese rudness is totally overstated. I've lived in Paris, New York, London and Sydney and find that Chinese people from Hong Kong are actually much nicer than all of the other locals I've met! If you're in the street looking lost, with a map in your hand: someone will always come up to you and ask you if they can help! People are really nice here! They go out of their way to be helpful, be it in the bus or on the street. They smile a lot and they're never snobbish...


  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    130

    'I think I just have low tolerance to those who cough without covering their mouths, or bump into me and don't apologise or something like that. '

    Oh I see, well I just read up on some cross cultural websites before I came and knew that would happen but it's not rude here so I don't care, it's just cultural.

    There is know universal ethos, only situational ethics.

    I took the MTR the other day just to see how it was and it was far and away nicer than any other subway I've ever seen. The Tube can't compare so at least that's nicer!


  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Park Island
    Posts
    2,057
    Quote Originally Posted by sbowra:
    Well, I lived in Kensington. I have to say the accommodation cost here is probably similar to the UK (judging from the letting income we get from renting out our flat in Kensington). Do not expect the finish or size of the apartment here to be as good as London.

    I would definitely come here to visit even just for a few days. It will be worth it to see what it’s like. My husband hated it at first and if they didn’t pay him so much, he wouldn't be here after 4 months.

    Consider your wife lifestyle also. If she’s used to have her own career back in the UK, she might be frustrated here and feel worthless sometime (like me). After 4 months, Hong Kong is a small place to live. I would come here with your wife, if I were you. And try to imagine what's it like to live here. To put it lightly, they have a different standard of manners here. I am saying this in a very factual way, not at all racist or snobbish way. Their manners can annoy you on the daily basis to the point that no amount of money can compensate that.

    On the bright side, it is cheaper to eat out (not sure about the quality of food though) and to shop. Again they have either the top range brands or the street market no-brand, not a lot of in between such as Gap, Top Shop.

    Hygiene will become almost your daily concern, unlike when you live in London. You think about it in the MTR, on the street, supermarket etc. I also find supermarket food packaging here is not very good. On some day I find that I get an upset stomach from eating food from the local supermarket. The more international supermarkets mark up the price to about the same as the UK, so not a lot of saving there.

    I'm not sure whether it is better to be here if you already have a good life in the UK. But if you think you will come here only for a couple of years to advanced your career and go back, then it should be alright.

    Oh, if you wear contact lens, be preparing not to be able to wear them in Hong Kong and prepare a nice pair of glasses to wear. Your eyes will become dry to the point hat you may not be able wear contact lens for a long while.

    I know it sounds really negative here but I think it is something you need to consider before moving here. You might not mind what I mentioned above at all.

    It’s more fun to be in Hong Kong than the UK. It’s more civilised to be in the UK than Hong Kong. English are more open minded than Hong Konger. Professionals are more professional in the UK. You can trust that your employer will not do anything which against human rights or employee’s rights in the UK which is quite a reassuring thing. It’s quite a lonely place to be here if you just can not get along well with your colleagues. One more thing, from the people I know here and my husband’s company, be prepared to be the white western minority in your company. You will feel like an outsider.
    sbowra,

    I'm just wondering, how many times have you moved from your home country out to live in another country? There are things that always irk me whenever I live in another country but take everything with a pinch of salt. I find it hard to accept it when you mention that their manners can annoy you on the daily basis to the point that no amount of money can compensate that. So what about the recent issue on Big Brother in UK. What do you say about that? Is everyone from UK that way? I don't think so. How many locals do you know? And I mean you actually know? I find locals are helpful all the time and of course little things like burping and bad breath irk me but it won't send me running home or me hating the place.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    7

    to sbowra and all expats,
    I'm a local born Hong Kong. But I went to study in US alone when I was 18. I went there all alone without knowing anyone first. I searched the school by myself, find apartments, look for everything else myself. I know how it feels to move to a total whole new place.
    well, to me, it just takes time to get used to the new environment and more important to the culture. Eastern and Western culture is a lot different to say. Culture is actually the key thing you have to pay attention to. Once you realize the different and try to accept it, things will be easier.
    agreeing sbowra, some HK people could be quite rude sometimes and I hate that too. well, but like sunniefaith and ontheroad said, there are nice people in HK too. Make friends with the nicer ones and forgive the bad ones.
    I moved back to HK 2 years ago and even as a local born here, I couldn't switch back to the Eastern culture right away. I was very irriated by the overly crowded places, and the people pushing around in mongkok. But time will make it different. I'm now almost getting used to it. (hehe.. almost)
    well, if you really don't find the very local things appealing to you, Central and Stanley and mostly in the HK island side, there're more internationals.
    I think moving to a new place could be on one hand stressful, but on the other hand excited and fun.


  8. #18

    Well thank you for all your advice. Not sure how it became a discussion of cultural differences! We have actually lived in Tokyo for two years before and found the differences culturally one of the interesting things about the experience so this is not something I am too concerned with! Also - I am actually the 'wife' that sbowra is talking to so I am not being forced by my husband to come to HK - it is a joint decision.
    Could anyone give me any idea on the cost of joining a club and if this is something that a lot of people do?? We are thinking of living on the South Side of the island. Also - is it expensive/difficult to get from this side of the island to central and is there much in the way of shopping /restaurants on the South side or would you also need to make a journey in for these kinds of things???

    Thank you - !


  9. #19

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    on the road again
    Posts
    927

    Clubs are incredibly expensive, like crazy crazy expensive. Unless of course you work for a company that has a debenture in one of those clubs...

    It's very easy to get from the southside to the city to go to restaurants: in the evenings it only takes 20 minutes. There are also plenty of nice restaurants in the southside : at Repulse Bay and Stanley. And some shopping too. We even have a brand new Dymocks bookstore and a Starbucks!!


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    130

    'Could anyone give me any idea on the cost of joining a club and if this is something that a lot of people do??'

    part of the expat package at my company for married people is the company pays for club membership - yu may want to negotiate for that


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