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Is Hong Kong Sunny or Gloomy (or both)?

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  1. #11

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    There are different types of pollution. On a lower traffic weekend day like today for example, the suspended particulates are virtually the same all over HK. Lowest is 52 in Kwai Chung and highest 59 in Tap Mun with Central at 55 and Yuen Long at 54. These would likely go up during traffic and if there are large construction projects going on. Of course these are the stations set up on rooftops, roadside ones are often considerably higher.

    There are also Sulphur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, Volatile Organic compounds and carbon monoxide levels. Depending on the day, the winds and the economic activities in China, the numbers will vary in different areas.

    This year, no station recorded high levels of pollution in July due to favorable winds(rainy season) and possibly some improvements in overall air quality. Meanwhile last March, levels went up above 500 at many station shortly before Rugby Sevens prompting talk of cancellation. That could have been the best thing that could have happened, it might have prompted a bit more action. The reading went back down between 70-120 shortly after. 50 is considered high and 100 very high...

    Hong Kong has the highest vehicle density in the world, which is particularly ludicrous given its compact geographical area. Diesel trucks and buses are the biggest polluters on the roads, accounting for 88% of harmful particulates and 75% of nitrogen oxide, another pollutant. Around one third of the commercial bus and truck fleet – 38,500 vehicles out of 117,000 – that run on antiquated ‘pre-Euro’ or ‘Euro I’ engines account for 73% of particulate emissions.Hong Kong has the highest vehicle density in the world, which is particularly ludicrous given its compact geographical area. Diesel trucks and buses are the biggest polluters on the roads, accounting for 88% of harmful particulates and 75% of nitrogen oxide, another pollutant. Around one third of the commercial bus and truck fleet – 38,500 vehicles out of 117,000 – that run on antiquated ‘pre-Euro’ or ‘Euro I’ engines account for 73% of particulate emissions.

    There is really nowhere to hide but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it's worse on Hennessy Rd than on Shek O beach... Whether it's better or worse on a rooftop in Repulse bay, on the peak or in Yuen Long is debatable and will probably depend on the day and where the wind is blowing.

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  2. #12

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    Nice plagiarism there gilles. Didn't figure you as a China Worker reader!

    China Worker


  3. #13

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    Another useless comment that adds nothing to the discussion which seems to be your specialty. If you have a point then make it... Second last paragraph comes from CW, it doesn't make it less true or troubling.

    I guess I should post the links to clean air, EPD and wikipedia since a lot of the other information comes from there. Surprisingly, I don't go out there to take my own measurements nor do I go out to count cars or get my calculator out to redo the same numbers that have already been done. If one thinks i make things up then I'll post sources otherwise, I leave it to ninnies like you to have fun with it...


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful797:

    What I was really worried about were iron gray skies with low clouds looming over that you often get in London (or, apparently per giles!, in the Pacific NW)
    Tsk tsk, there's no gray anything in London

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilleshk:
    Another useless comment that adds nothing to the discussion which seems to be your specialty. If you have a point then make it... Second last paragraph comes from CW, it doesn't make it less true or troubling.
    It is generally considered good netiquete to state your sources if you lift chunks of text wholesale from other sites... the fact you didn't, and tried to weave it into your own narrative makes it look like you are trying to pass it off as your own. This isn't citing statistics, it is bare faced plagiarism. Nice try gilles, and I love your bitter little attack when I pointed it out.... let me borrow a phrase from the inestimable Dennis Healey and say it was like being savaged by a dead sheep.

  6. #16

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    And more hot air blowing on HK... You are obviously not concerned about climate change. Good netiquette(that would be double tt) to spell properly too but you don't seem too bothered by it...

    What a joker you are... You are simply picking fleas because you find me irritating. Anyway, when you have anything of value to add, it might become mildly more interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    It is generally considered good netiquete to state your sources if you lift chunks of text wholesale from other sites... the fact you didn't, and tried to weave it into your own narrative makes it look like you are trying to pass it off as your own. This isn't citing statistics, it is bare faced plagiarism. Nice try gilles, and I love your bitter little attack when I pointed it out.... let me borrow a phrase from the inestimable Dennis Healey and say it was like being savaged by a dead sheep.
    Last edited by gilleshk; 14-11-2010 at 11:56 PM.

  7. #17

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    Gilles

    That's the poster formerly known as Geoff for you.


  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilleshk:
    There are different types of pollution. On a lower traffic weekend day like today for example, the suspended particulates are virtually the same all over HK. Lowest is 52 in Kwai Chung and highest 59 in Tap Mun with Central at 55 and Yuen Long at 54. These would likely go up during traffic and if there are large construction projects going on. Of course these are the stations set up on rooftops, roadside ones are often considerably higher.

    There are also Sulphur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, Volatile Organic compounds and carbon monoxide levels. Depending on the day, the winds and the economic activities in China, the numbers will vary in different areas.

    This year, no station recorded high levels of pollution in July due to favorable winds(rainy season) and possibly some improvements in overall air quality. Meanwhile last March, levels went up above 500 at many station shortly before Rugby Sevens prompting talk of cancellation. That could have been the best thing that could have happened, it might have prompted a bit more action. The reading went back down between 70-120 shortly after. 50 is considered high and 100 very high...

    Hong Kong has the highest vehicle density in the world, which is particularly ludicrous given its compact geographical area. Diesel trucks and buses are the biggest polluters on the roads, accounting for 88% of harmful particulates and 75% of nitrogen oxide, another pollutant. Around one third of the commercial bus and truck fleet – 38,500 vehicles out of 117,000 – that run on antiquated ‘pre-Euro’ or ‘Euro I’ engines account for 73% of particulate emissions.Hong Kong has the highest vehicle density in the world, which is particularly ludicrous given its compact geographical area. Diesel trucks and buses are the biggest polluters on the roads, accounting for 88% of harmful particulates and 75% of nitrogen oxide, another pollutant. Around one third of the commercial bus and truck fleet – 38,500 vehicles out of 117,000 – that run on antiquated ‘pre-Euro’ or ‘Euro I’ engines account for 73% of particulate emissions.

    There is really nowhere to hide but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it's worse on Hennessy Rd than on Shek O beach... Whether it's better or worse on a rooftop in Repulse bay, on the peak or in Yuen Long is debatable and will probably depend on the day and where the wind is blowing.
    lol, well, here's the science from one of those Google Gurus, lol

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryant.english:
    lol, well, here's the science from one of those Google Gurus, lol
    At least one bothers to read before posting an opinion instead of digging deep into one's sphincter... Once again, hot air ballon adding nothing of any consequence.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo:
    Gilles

    That's the poster formerly known as Geoff for you.
    What happened? Too dumb or drunk to remember a password??? Delirium tremens it is I guess...

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