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What is better to bring from the UK rather than buy in HK? And where to live of course?!

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Yes, the people on buses here are generally a lot ruder and less civilized than you'll find in London... plus they love to yell into their mobile phones which they have set at maximum volume. Also the bus drivers here often don't appear to know the accelerator and brakes have settings between on and off.
    Great! I find London buses bad enough...buses full of Chinese Dom Joly's shouting "hello I'm on the bus!!!" into their phones....argh!!!

    I have no problems with kamikaze bus drivers (as long as my life assurance premiums are up-to date lol) but rude and uncivilised is going to take some getting used. I moved to Paris (with work) earlier this year and have had to really moderate my behaviour on public transport here as London/NYC style I'm-in-hurry-I-have-to-get-to-work-get-out-of-my-way-you-muppet behaviour is frowned upon and seen as quite rude. People here are surprisingly polite (on the metro at least...different altogether on the suburban trains) and its weirdly refreshing. I guess I'd better get sharpening my elbows and attitude problem for HK then.

  2. #12

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    Sorry guys, another question....is cycling popular on HK island? I haven't seen any mention on here of people cycling to get to work etc so I'm assuming its too dangerous or just not done??? Is there any point bringing my bike with me? (apart from wondering how on earth I'll afford an apartment that's big enough to keep it in!)

    Thanks!!


  3. #13

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    I wouldnt bring a load of electrical appliances over here unless your alternative is throwing them away (will you be keeping a place in UK?)

    Surely half the fun is buying new stuff and HK is a great city to buy these types of things with its lack of tax


  4. #14

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    PS from your post you seem to be very worried that HK in no way caters for westerners.. Don't worry, this isn't the case. Especially on HK island, you can get just about whatever comforts you need... But at times you'll pay a premium

    Also, when you refer to yourself as 'too big and western' and having 'western feet'... it does make me laugh.

    I'm pretty sure you can find some biggish shoes and clothes over here too, unless what you mean is you have size 19 feet and a 50 inch waist.

    That said, I'm below average for a WESTERNER, so I'm no expert!


  5. #15

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    Good luck with the job and fingers crossed you find some things you like when you get here. It's a fun city and you can have great times here, but obviously there are differences that you need to acclimatise to and there will be some things that will drive you crazy.

    Food wise you can pretty much buy most regular UK things here, there are plenty of standard supermarkets that almost entirely cater to international food desires. Even nice bread can be found and bought easily, although admittedly most supermarkets standard sliced bread is not what you'd be thinking of. There are also more expensive specialised supermarkets that stock more obscure items. I've not found anything (other than goats milk) that I bought back in the UK that I can't get here.

    For living, as a first timer I'd definitely say look in Mid-levels or Soho and Sheung Wan areas, you'll gain many of the benefits of living in Hong Kong (very short walking commute, busy easy social scene and all the Western home comforst HK has).

    Public transport is cheaper, faster, more frequent and more reliable than anything in the UK (taxis, buses, minibuses, trams, tubes, trains). Public transport users in the UK are either very polite and aware of those around them or psychopaths one blink away from a raging death tantrum, here nobody gives a rats arse about you or your comfort, but they won't potentially kill you either. Pros and cons.

    Electricals are not significantly cheaper here any more so bring anything you are still happy with, especially as someone else is paying. Anything you have that is old or you've thought about replacing you may as well wait and buy new here, with some hard bargaining you can fnd a deal on a newer product, just don't think it's the electrics mecca it once was.


  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bibbju:
    Sorry guys, another question....is cycling popular on HK island? I haven't seen any mention on here of people cycling to get to work etc so I'm assuming its too dangerous or just not done??? Is there any point bringing my bike with me? (apart from wondering how on earth I'll afford an apartment that's big enough to keep it in!)

    Thanks!!
    Popular, no. If want to and you're mega-fit...the Island has a LOT of very steep hills. Also traffic is very heavy and not sympathetic! There was a recent thread on here about cycling but I can't find it. It's not impossible, there are areas in HK where you can, but the island is far from ideal.

  7. #17

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    Bring your bike, if you are a keen cyclist there are groups here and there are places to do some pretty exciting off-road mountain stuff. It's very mountainous here and hot, so that does play a key factor, but there definitely is cycling action here, just on a smaller scale. If you end up staying and liking it some New Territories tonwns (Tai Po) have lots of cycle paths and reasonably long flat routes.

    Satay Sue likes this.

  8. #18

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    Sorry for multiple posting, also just noticed you were living in Paris, we were also living in Paris before coming here. We had lived here in the past, so the transition wasn't unexpected to us, but I'd say Paris to Hong Kong is harder than London to HK in terms of cultural transition, especially your work environment. In my experience Paris is pretty chilled and laid back pleasant work environments, Hong Kong is possibly the antithesis of that.


  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by bibbju:
    So is it worth bringing a TV, hifi, etc over? Or better value to get in HK and face the crowds?? Just to add that my current TV etc is old and I was about to replace it in London....if/when I move to HK, I will still keep my London flat (and rent it out once I'm happy that I'm settled in HK) so I need to buy a new TV that I will leave behind anyway - its just a question of whether I buy another to take to HK as well.

    I'm actually currently living (and working) in France and even though I speak French, I'm used to going to shops where they look at me like I've come from Mars and/or where I don't understand the local's way of doing things....the French do like their "secret rules". I'm quite integrated compared to most of the expats I know here in Paris but I see them going through quite a lot of pain trying to get things done...and I guess it'll be my turn to be on the receiving end of that in HK.
    If its a smallish LCD tv, then take it with you to HK, to be honest the TV channels are really crap in HK, I hardly ever watch TV. France and HK are a totally different kettle of fish.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Yes, the people on buses here are generally a lot ruder and less civilized than you'll find in London... plus they love to yell into their mobile phones which they have set at maximum volume. Also the bus drivers here often don't appear to know the accelerator and brakes have settings between on and off.
    yes, maybe, but at least in HK, unlike in a lot cities including london in uk, you won't get mugged, happy slapped, beaten up for no reasons which happens escalated over the last fews in uk due to poor justice system and yobbo/chav/scally culture
    chingleutsch and Limbo like this.

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