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Do you regret moving to Hong Kong?

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  1. #141

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    Olympus make all their money from endoscopes - their camera business is sub-par and loss making. But the wider point is that it is absurd to claim no Asian company innovates, especially when they dominate their markets.



    Asia has 92% market share, rest of world 8%

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  2. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by dear giant:
    Standardized math and science test scores show that HK kids as a group do better than American kids as a group on those tests that's because HK kids are under a lot more pressure to do well on standardized tests and are coached in those subjects. Later, they major in business or finance because that's where the jobs are ... or they emigrate. Many of the high-scoring American kids go on to actually take up careers in STEM fields, working alongside emigres from places like HK who had to travel to the US to realize their dreams.

    That's the reality.
    You do realize you are comparing a city vs a country. That the US offer more choices post studies is obvious (although it remains to be seen the quality of what is offer...), but describing the situation as you did (in the post I replied to) as Robots vs Kids pursing their dream is a very extreme generalization that is almost laughable

    I hate to take my better half family as example but just to provide a bit of balance in those always very extreme posts of yours:
    4 kids:
    - one is a housewife now (she used to be an entrepreneur and is married to one)
    - one is a Uni teacher (my wife)
    - one is a photographer (mostly art photography) and part time journalist
    - one is a physician

    None major in Business and/or Finance.
    None has moved out of HK/Macau and two have studied abroad in Taiwan and Mailand China but came back for work.

    This is not the majority of ppl in HK, I admit but your overgeneralizations are a bit too much, even you must realize this.

  3. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Olympus make all their money from endoscopes - their camera business is sub-par and loss making. But the wider point is that it is absurd to claim no Asian company innovates, especially when they dominate their markets.



    Asia has 92% market share, rest of world 8%
    I am not disagreeing with the statement that asians are innovators - in fact, I agree.

    However, you picked the cameras market where the top-level innovation happens in Sweden. Those Hasselblad systems are incredible.

    As for Olympus, I have a real affinity for their SLR range. I also have an E-series DSLR which is as good (and if not better) than my Sony alpha DSLR. Olympus also pioneered the "pen" (both first time and second time round). I don't think one can flippantly disregard their importance to the camera market.

    Completely off-topic but I feel much better! Phew!

  4. #144

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    Muckycat

    Shame Olympus are heading down the toilet then.


  5. #145

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    I expect Olympus will flog have to their camera business, if they can find a buyer. Looks like they managed to make a Y15bn loss on sales of 131bn last fiscal year [Imaging Systems segment], if we can actually believe any of their financial statements at the moment.


  6. #146

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    Yep, it really is. This was my first camera (until my snot-nosed sister stole it and took it to the states with her. COW). I love a multitude of cameras but for me, nothing has ever come close to the quality of that camera.


  7. #147

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    Maybe they can sell it to Kodak ---


  8. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat:
    You do realize you are comparing a city vs a country. That the US offer more choices post studies is obvious (although it remains to be seen the quality of what is offer...), but describing the situation as you did (in the post I replied to) as Robots vs Kids pursing their dream is a very extreme generalization that is almost laughable
    US universities are filled to the brim with foreign students studying STEM majors. Overseas students studying STEM subjects in Asian universities are much, much rarer. As for the quality of US employment in STEM fields or the quality of the graduates (unclear what you're referencing), you and I live in a world where most of the technology that we use every day was created in or pioneered in the USA and other Western countries, so I suppose that the quality of whatever it is you're thinking of must not be too poor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mat:
    I hate to take my better half family as example but just to provide a bit of balance in those always very extreme posts of yours:
    4 kids:
    - one is a housewife now (she used to be an entrepreneur and is married to one)
    - one is a Uni teacher (my wife)
    - one is a photographer (mostly art photography) and part time journalist
    - one is a physician

    None major in Business and/or Finance.
    None has moved out of HK/Macau and two have studied abroad in Taiwan and Mailand China but came back for work.

    This is not the majority of ppl in HK, I admit but your overgeneralizations are a bit too much, even you must realize this.
    None of the people you mentioned is a scientist or an engineer or works in technology per se. We've got a housewife, a teacher, a photographer, and a doctor. I have no doubt that they are all decent and intelligent people and the world definitely needs stay-at-home parents, teachers, photographers, and doctors. Since you've proposed them as examples of people who break the robotized / passion-less stereotype, please do not be offended if I ask you a few sincere questions about them. My questions are not intended to offend.

    Is your wife conducting research (leading, for example, to publication in peer-reviewed journals relevant to her field) in addition to her teaching duties? If she does not conduct research, how does her lecturing style differ significantly from typical HK uni lecturers (in terms of techniques used to increase student engagement/participation)? If she's doing research or running her lectures in interesting ways, challenging her students to think in real-time, then I would agree with you that she might not fit the robotized/passionless mold. Otherwise, not so much.

    You characterized the photographer in your family as an art photographer. I am interpreting this to mean that they do not do a significant amount of wedding or family portrait photography. Is that the case? How many galleries inside or outside HK have featured their work? Do they have a Flickr account or something similar? If so, how many views/comments/favorited-photos (or equivalent metric) do they have? Have they licensed images to Corbis / Getty Images / etc.? [I'm not disqualifying anyone as an art photog if they have/haven't licensed photos to digital image licensing corps -- just trying to find signs of passion/skill.]

    You haven't said what sort of doctor the doctor in your family is -- what their specialty is, whether they are in private practice and/or work in a hospital (public or private), etc. If they're the sort of doctor who has a private clinic and dispenses pills, then I probably wouldn't think that they broke the robotized/passionless mold. If they divided their time between treating patients, learning the latest techniques in their field, and were conducting medical research or drug trials, then I might agree that they defied the HK stereotype.

  9. #149

  10. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by dear giant:
    US universities are filled to the brim with foreign students studying STEM majors. Overseas students studying STEM subjects in Asian universities are much, much rarer. As for the quality of US employment in STEM fields or the quality of the graduates (unclear what you're referencing), you and I live in a world where most of the technology that we use every day was created in or pioneered in the USA and other Western countries, so I suppose that the quality of whatever it is you're thinking of must not be too poor.



    None of the people you mentioned is a scientist or an engineer or works in technology per se. We've got a housewife, a teacher, a photographer, and a doctor. I have no doubt that they are all decent and intelligent people and the world definitely needs stay-at-home parents, teachers, photographers, and doctors. Since you've proposed them as examples of people who break the robotized / passion-less stereotype, please do not be offended if I ask you a few sincere questions about them. My questions are not intended to offend.

    Is your wife conducting research (leading, for example, to publication in peer-reviewed journals relevant to her field) in addition to her teaching duties? If she does not conduct research, how does her lecturing style differ significantly from typical HK uni lecturers (in terms of techniques used to increase student engagement/participation)? If she's doing research or running her lectures in interesting ways, challenging her students to think in real-time, then I would agree with you that she might not fit the robotized/passionless mold. Otherwise, not so much.

    You characterized the photographer in your family as an art photographer. I am interpreting this to mean that they do not do a significant amount of wedding or family portrait photography. Is that the case? How many galleries inside or outside HK have featured their work? Do they have a Flickr account or something similar? If so, how many views/comments/favorited-photos (or equivalent metric) do they have? Have they licensed images to Corbis / Getty Images / etc.? [I'm not disqualifying anyone as an art photog if they have/haven't licensed photos to digital image licensing corps -- just trying to find signs of passion/skill.]

    You haven't said what sort of doctor the doctor in your family is -- what their specialty is, whether they are in private practice and/or work in a hospital (public or private), etc. If they're the sort of doctor who has a private clinic and dispenses pills, then I probably wouldn't think that they broke the robotized/passionless mold. If they divided their time between treating patients, learning the latest techniques in their field, and were conducting medical research or drug trials, then I might agree that they defied the HK stereotype.
    You really expect me to publish information about my family on a forum?

    What world do you live in?

    Uni teach - yes she publishes, no I will not provide example else her name would be public. As a matter of fact she also works with gvt officials to amend and implement new curriculum (her speciality...so yes I know a thing or two about HK curriculums and the various issues the sector faces...)

    Pohotgrapher: yes Flickr Account, no I will not provide the details of the account. Yes she has exposed and as a matter of fact published two books. Available in some of the HK libraries. She also travel the world to photograph and she mostly focuses on people in their daily life.

    Physician, my bad english here it should be physicist (ie study physics). He just started his career so no need to ask me if has published or anything since he just started.


    But anyway, any amount of argumentation we will present you will be brushed aside as "untrue" or "not relevant" or "not enough proof" since you already made your mind: HK ppl = robots and nothing is going to change your mindest.
    dear giant likes this.

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