Do we bring electrical appliances?

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  1. #1

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    Do we bring electrical appliances?

    We're relocating from the US to HKG in August and starting the packing process. Notwithstanding the difference in voltage and amps, someone recommended bringing electrical appliances (kitchen stuff, hair dryer, small home power tools, etc.) because the cost of buying this stuff in HKG is huge and the quality is very iffy. Welcome any comments/suggestions.


  2. #2

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    dont think your advisors have every been to hk.

    they are not expensive, are readily available and of the same brand names you'd be used to....


  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by DChapman:
    We're relocating from the US to HKG in August and starting the packing process. Notwithstanding the difference in voltage and amps, someone recommended bringing electrical appliances (kitchen stuff, hair dryer, small home power tools, etc.) because the cost of buying this stuff in HKG is huge and the quality is very iffy. Welcome any comments/suggestions.
    If that someone calls you again to offer any advice, dont answer the phone; someone doesnt know what they are talking about.

  4. #4

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    different voltage requires bulky, expensive unefficient step down transformers


  5. #5

    I just moved to HK from the US and faced the same question on whether to bring our really nice electrical appliances or buy new ones here in HK. While you can purchase transformers that will step down the local 220V to 120V, you will still be faced with the difference in cycles, the US has 60 Hz and HK uses 50 Hz. Will the appliance work--probably, but will not work as effectively.

    You can buy everything here. Some of the Made in China appliances are quite inexpensive, but if you want good US, European or Japanese brands--the prices are about 1.5X the cost in USA. For example, we bought a Zojurushi rice cooker, Dyson vacuum, Jura Capresso coffee machine, Sharp microwave and various other appliances to replace those we left behind in USA and they cost 130-170% more than the same item in USA.

    Still feel this is the better route, as good quality transformers are not inexpensive and buying here means that you can receive warranty service on your new appliances.


  6. #6

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    I found that kettles and coffee machines are significantly more expensive in HK than they are in the UK for the same level of quality, and some of the top end brands are hard to find here. Those are the two electrical items I'd consider bringing with me if I was you but for the rest, just buy in HK.


  7. #7

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    Coffee maker, I can kind of understand but a kettle? We are talking about a water boiler here...What quality do you actually need from a Kettle? You plug it in, a min or 2 later, it boils the water. Am I missing some trick here?


  8. #8

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    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO is the answer to your question


  9. #9

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    a lot would also come down to:
    are you paying for the move yourself or is your company paying for it?


  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by richardintaipo:
    You can buy everything here. Some of the Made in China appliances are quite inexpensive, but if you want good US, European or Japanese brands--the prices are about 1.5X the cost in USA. For example, we bought a Zojurushi rice cooker, Dyson vacuum, Jura Capresso coffee machine, Sharp microwave and various other appliances to replace those we left behind in USA and they cost 130-170% more than the same item in USA.
    You mean 30-70% more, right? (130-170% more means 2.3 to 2.7 times as expensive)

    Still feel this is the better route, as good quality transformers are not inexpensive and buying here means that you can receive warranty service on your new appliances.
    Transformers also pose a safety risk, in particular if you pair them with equipment that uses water (like electric kettles, rice cookers or coffee machines) since they are usually not insulated. In my opinion they don't have any business of being used in a kitchen.

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