Like Tree143Likes

Quick question about the language

Closed Thread
Page 6 of 18 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 14 ... LastLast
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    5,112
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Yes you are. Fortunately not a single person believes you
    Umm...and people believe you?! In any case, I was talking about you in that post. You don't know? Now you are even failing basic reading comprehension. My, my, TB, you must have forgotten to take your pills today.There now, take your pill, it doesn't hurt. And do see your doctor's appointment.

    You still haven't told me what "local" market you went to. And which "dozen". You can't can you? See, TB and his imaginary wet market trips...wonder what prescription the doctor will give you.

    As for cantonese. IF you absolutely refuse to learn it fine, if you do, good for you.
    Last edited by Watercooler; 01-10-2013 at 02:40 PM.

  2. #52

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    Posts
    3,987

    I speak fluent Cantonese, and the posters on here thinking that not knowing the language makes no difference at all is absolutely deluded.

    Granted I can't read Chinese, so when I catch the news or gossip, I need to view Cantonese Web videos. English local newspapers and TV news only cover some of what's going on, there's so much more out there.

    There was a Cantonese Web video about a week or so ago talking about how drug stores are flogging off fake brands of medicine. How many of the expats know this? Can yo tell the difference in the packaging?

    As for wet markets, how many of you expats know that locals don't actually pay for small things like spring onions, garlic and ginger? When you buy up to a certain amount, you ask for them and they get thrown in free. I've seen plenty of expats all proud of themselves after managing to buy a bunch of Choi sum and then pay for spring onions.....

    You go into a temple, speak with the locals that work there and you learn so much more about the place and the culture. Try that in English.

    These ignorant expats live in their own bubble and are too arrogant to either notice it or adapt.



    Sent from my GT-N7100 using GeoClicks mobile app


  3. #53

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    267
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryks:
    How much will I get away with when using English? Should I make the effort to learn Cantonese or Mandarin? Also not quite sure which one. I heard Cantonese is the main language there, but a Chinese friend of mine told me to learn Mandarin as everyone there speaks it and then I can use it in China too.

    If I can get by with English then that would be good. I don't mind learning another language, but am teaching myself Japanese at the moment so it would be hard!
    You can get by with using English in most places. Cantonese is the de facto language for locals here. English is a more widely spoken language here than Mandarin
    Last edited by YCC; 01-10-2013 at 02:57 PM.

  4. #54

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    4,040
    Quote Originally Posted by Proplus:
    I speak fluent Cantonese, and the posters on here thinking that not knowing the language makes no difference at all is absolutely deluded.

    Granted I can't read Chinese, so when I catch the news or gossip, I need to view Cantonese Web videos. English local newspapers and TV news only cover some of what's going on, there's so much more out there.

    There was a Cantonese Web video about a week or so ago talking about how drug stores are flogging off fake brands of medicine. How many of the expats know this? Can yo tell the difference in the packaging?

    As for wet markets, how many of you expats know that locals don't actually pay for small things like spring onions, garlic and ginger? When you buy up to a certain amount, you ask for them and they get thrown in free. I've seen plenty of expats all proud of themselves after managing to buy a bunch of Choi sum and then pay for spring onions.....

    You go into a temple, speak with the locals that work there and you learn so much more about the place and the culture. Try that in English.

    These ignorant expats live in their own bubble and are too arrogant to either notice it or adapt.



    Sent from my GT-N7100 using GeoClicks mobile app


    Aren't you assuming that no locals can speak English? I have a half dozen or so local friends with whom I go all over with, including wet markets.

    Don't get me wrong, speaking the local language is a perk.. But not like it is in most other countries. English is widely spoken. The most important thing is to become close friends with a local...if you have a real friend who is a local, they can teach you a lot whether it be in canto or english

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    22,465
    Quote Originally Posted by Proplus:
    I speak fluent Cantonese, and the posters on here thinking that not knowing the language makes no difference at all is absolutely deluded.
    Nobody said it doesn't make any difference. Plenty of people said you don't need to learn the language to get by in daily life, which is completely true.

    Quote Originally Posted by Proplus:
    As for wet markets, how many of you expats know that locals don't actually pay for small things like spring onions, garlic and ginger? When you buy up to a certain amount, you ask for them and they get thrown in free.
    Really? I have never needed to ask for spring onions, they always get thrown in for free anyway. You have to ask? Very odd.

  6. #56

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    512

    we always got them free too without a word of cantonese


  7. #57

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    Posts
    3,987
    Quote Originally Posted by closedcasket:
    Aren't you assuming that no locals can speak English? I have a half dozen or so local friends with whom I go all over with, including wet markets.
    Not at all, but then one isn't going to go around hk all the time with a Cantonese speaker.



    Sent from my GT-N7100 using GeoClicks mobile app
    Watercooler likes this.

  8. #58

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Pearl of the Orient
    Posts
    4,002
    Quote Originally Posted by Proplus:
    As for wet markets, how many of you expats know that locals don't actually pay for small things like spring onions, garlic and ginger? When you buy up to a certain amount, you ask for them and they get thrown in free. I've seen plenty of expats all proud of themselves after managing to buy a bunch of Choi sum and then pay for spring onions.....

    You go into a temple, speak with the locals that work there and you learn so much more about the place and the culture. Try that in English.

    These ignorant expats live in their own bubble and are too arrogant to either notice it or adapt.



    Sent from my GT-N7100 using GeoClicks mobile app
    Find it very strange that Proplus, as a fluent Cantonese speaker has to buy up to a certain amount before he gets some free spring onions. I always get given a bunch even if I am buying a couple of onions or spuds.

    If I really want to learn about the temples of Hong Kong, something I have to admit I am not particularly interested in, I can use Google, where all the information you could possibly want is at your fingertips, and in English.

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Tsim Sha Tsui
    Posts
    3,987
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit:
    Nobody said it doesn't make any difference. Plenty of people said you don't need to learn the language to get by in daily life, which is completely true.
    Sure, get by in your daily life living in a bubble. What's the point in coming to HK when you don't experience the local culture? GTFO.



    Really? I have never needed to ask for spring onions, they always get thrown in for free anyway. You have to ask? Very odd.
    You've never asked because you don't speak Cantonese, and the stall owner don't speaker English, and you pointing at the spring onions doesn't really count as not asking.

    And the gweilos didn't get it for free as the stall owner had already rounded 'up' the price of the Choi sum you just bought. Both parties are happy; the stall owner made the gweilo think they got something for free but in fact had paid more for their original purchase and would've go the free spring onions anyway.

    Even locals have to ask.


    Sent from my GT-N7100 using GeoClicks mobile app
    Gatts likes this.

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    22,465

    You are a real muppet, laughing out loud. By the way, at least half a dozen stall owners speak decent English in the wetmarket near Temple St - possibly this is your local market too? Really arrogant of you to assume they're all too local, stupid or poorly educated to speak English. Step out of your BBC bubble

    usehername, bibbju and Elegiaque like this.

Closed Thread
Page 6 of 18 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 14 ... LastLast