Moving the family to

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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by gilleshk:
    I hope you don't seriously think that the pollution in HK has little effect on your health...
    Of course I do. I'm not saying it has zero effect, but if I felt the effect were significant I wouldn't stay here. I'm really intrigued to know what it is about Hong Kong that you feel is worth seriously affecting your health for.

  2. #12

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    Gilleshk - the problem was your alarmist "you can expect to have coughs and shortness of breath particularly if you exercise intensely" that caused raised eyebrows. That just isn't true. Perhaps if you had written "If you exercise intensely outdoors you can expect to have coughs and shortness of breath" it would have been accurate.


  3. #13

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    Well perhaps it could have been phrased better. On the other hand, as I said there are many people that do feel side effects from the population even without exercising particularly with older people or ones that have some kind of respiratory problem. The young and healthy are unlikely to feel it except under duress. Just because it doesn't happen to you, doesn't mean it isn't real...

    Pollution is a huge problem here and it is driving people away. That's also a fact... Some people deal with it better than others.

    When one is aware of a problem, it is easier to deal with it. I have air purifiers at home and at work which covers at least 18 hours of my day so that's the compromise I make but there's no doubt I wouldn't consider Hong Kong to retire primarily because of the pollution.


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fergies13:
    3. I was told that transporting the dog to HK may take up to 2 days beause they can only be airborne for a maximum of 5 hours at a time. Can anyone shed any light on this?

    Looking forward to getting some sound advice

    Thanks
    Nope, not true. Our dogs were in the air about 14 hours (from LA) - dogs handled it fine. Send me a message if you need any info on moving dogs, or there is plenty of good info on the pet forum...

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    Gilleshk - the problem was your alarmist "you can expect to have coughs and shortness of breath particularly if you exercise intensely" that caused raised eyebrows. That just isn't true. Perhaps if you had written "If you exercise intensely outdoors you can expect to have coughs and shortness of breath" it would have been accurate.
    I don't even know that the second statement is true. I've been jogging outside almost daily and hiking on weekends for a couple years now and haven't noticed any effects of pollution (no coughing, no shortness of breath, except what would be expected from a vigorous run...). The pollution here affects different people differently and plenty of people get by just fine. While its normal to be concerned about how pollution may effect your kids I truely don't understand people's fixation on pollution here.

  6. #16

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    I get nosebleeds if I go to Causeway Bay when the pollution level is very high...

    To the OP, of course the government downplays the pollution here and the monitoring of pollution is done to HK measurements (deliberately) so you can't easily compare the figures with overseas. Don't forget that if you are going to be here for a short amount of time you can do as other do, outweigh the (hopefully) limited effects on their children's health against the money they will be earning. Doing that helps them to justify the move.


  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire ex-ax:
    I get nosebleeds if I go to Causeway Bay when the pollution level is very high...

    To the OP, of course the government downplays the pollution here and the monitoring of pollution is done to HK measurements (deliberately) so you can't easily compare the figures with overseas. Don't forget that if you are going to be here for a short amount of time you can do as other do, outweigh the (hopefully) limited effects on their children's health against the money they will be earning. Doing that helps them to justify the move.
    As someone else said it effects people differently. All I can say to the OP is that neither myself, my wife or our kids or any people I know have suffered any obvious side effects. Apart from the view at times can't say I even notice it. It is clearly bad here at times, but I think its effects can be overplayed. Note also that HKers have one of the longest life expectancies in the world.

  8. #18

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    I don't think pollution can ever be overplayed and the levels have been growing steadily so it's hard to quantify that into future life expectancy stats. You say alarmist, I say realist. The basis of your analysis is that you feel fine, on the other hand, studies after studies show how dire the problem is and how little the government is doing.

    Hong Kong (AsiaNews/Agencies) – Chronic air pollution in Hong Kong causes at least 1,600 deaths per year mostly from heart attacks, strokes, pneumonia and other lung diseases. This was the outcome of a study conducted by three universities in the city and by Civic Exchange, an institution that is an expert on the problem.

    The study revealed that air pollution was 40% higher than in Los Angeles, America's most polluted large city. In 2004, Hong Kong recorded an average of 62 micrograms of respirable suspended particulates per cubic metre, compared with 30 in London and 22 in New York.

    Anthony Hedley, an environmental and public health expert at the University of Hong Kong, said: "Air pollution is a major threat to our health and our economy… This is a medical emergency" that leads each year to 6.8 million family doctor visits, 64,000 hospital bed-days and economic losses of 20 billion Hong Kong dollars (2.6 billion US dollars).


  9. #19

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    I'm not really arguing that the pollution level is overplayed but that its impact on the majority of people is overplayed. I was not just basing my comments on how it effects me but how it effects the say 100 people I know. Nor has my daughter reported that any of her schoolfriends are affected badly. So I would guess from that sample that the people who suffer coughing, shortness of breath, skin problems, etc are a small minority. Not a scientific survey I accept.


  10. #20

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    The problem is that you can't always notice the relationship between your health and pollution. Most people for example would expect to be out of breath climbing a set of stairs. The difference here is that you'll be more out of breath for the same effort level or a lower level of effort will cause that shortness of breath and that'll vary from day to day.

    When you're an athlete, you notice these differences very quickly. Your running times become slower, your heart rate is affected and your performance is significantly slower on certain days. That's why epidemiological studies are essential to quantify the negative effects of pollution as opposed to how a few individuals feel.


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