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Moving to HK- Cost of living ...

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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    29

    I thought so too but my wife thinks it's waste of money as we've always wanted to sample living outside UK for a few years! She thinks we should just got for it!

    civil_servant likes this.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Hong Kong
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    Not bad and your housing expectations are reasonable. Keep in mind it's a bit smaller but 20-30k can definitely get you a place in Tung Chung but if you had 40k to live at Kowloon station your life would be completely different. Tung Chung Carribean Coast you have a hike or a bus to get to the MTR. Do you really want to move here and isolate yourself?

    It's a decent package but I would try to get a 20-30k housing allowance. That would really make things great.

    jrkob likes this.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Islmvp25:
    I've worked out the tax and MPF and it seems closer to 75k a month unless I am mistaken. Apart from rent which I know is expensive- is everything else expensive or cheaper than in the UK? I can't work out the differences!
    Finally, someone who's done their research before coming on here asking for further advice. I think you will do well, and your salary is more than enough to enjoy a excellent lifestyle over here. Besides Tung Chung, I'd also recommend the Gold Coast, similar rent, but less crowded. Getting downtown by bus takes 45 minutes to an hour depending on whether you work Kowloon side or on Hong Kong island. The following things are cheap here, water, gas, electricity (not due to price, but due to you living in a much smaller space), phone plan, eating out (HK$400 for a family of 4 is possible), clothing, alcohol, vegetables (from local wet markets only), public transport, taxi, school (if local) and traveling to neighbouring tropical paradises. The following items are expensive, car (which is not required), rent, vegetables and fruit from grocery stores, imported food item, meat (especially beef), drinks in restaurants and bars (the HK$400 I mentioned for a restaurant, assumes you drink water which is free), schools (if International), and any kind of after-school activity for your kid which is not subsidized by the government.

    A few other recommendations. Your wife doesn't need to work in order to support your family. I'd suggest her to settle in with the kids first, research Kindergartens and schools, network with other parents/expats, and get to know the city while you're busy impressing your new boss. Some folks here suggested a domestic helper, but that can bring many headaches to your family and may not make the transition easier for you. It's a decision that should be left for later after doing some research on the topic. Once your kids are in school, you wife could consider flexible part-time work as an alternative to full-time work with helper.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Islmvp25:
    18-30k seems too much for rent looking at square foot and go home.com you can find a 3 bed flat in Carribean coast for about 20k per month for 800- 1000sq foot. Is this wrong??? Are there hidden costs I need to be aware??

    Thanks
    $20K for 3-bedroom place is absolutely right. There are no hidden costs. However, you'll need 1/2 months rent for the agent fee who helps you find a flat, plus 2 months deposit for the landlord. Make sure your rent includes management/condo fees., which it usually does.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Islmvp25:
    I thought so too but my wife thinks it's waste of money as we've always wanted to sample living outside UK for a few years! She thinks we should just got for it!
    Your wife is smart. If she finds a good job too, then you're set. How does early retirement sound? My wife makes similar to what you make, and I work part-time from home while taking care of the kids. We have kids in International school, drive a car, live in a nice 3-bedroom place, take 3-4 holidays per year, and were able to save up for a retirement home in Italy. There are some downsides though, such as pollution and burnout due to crazy work hours. Pollution affects everyone differently though, and work-life-balance is something you have to work on. A good approach is using empathic limits, like saying no with a smile. It works on my 5 year old, and it has worked on my bosses as well.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    116

    Lots of very encouraging posts here, and whilst I don't disagree with many things that are said I will add a few extra thoughts. Annual flights - going home or on holiday for 4 people at peak time costs$$$ try to get an annual flight allowance. If your used to going on several holidays a year this will eat into your budget. Yes you can eat out for $400 and it depends on how often you are used to eating out at the moment but don't be lulled into thinking most restaurants will cost this. Dinner for 2 adults and 2 kids at A 'typical' restaurant targeting westerners will most likely be a fair bit more. Heck a beer is ~$60 £6 in many places. Doing free (outdoor) stuff is always cool but the climate and pollution can limit some people's enjoyment of this. Shopping... I live with the philosophy that what ever I pay for something at the supermarket it will be far cheaper than if I had ordered it in a restaurant, that being said quality imported meat is $$$ and just yesterday I paid just under £30 quid for a box of mince pies and a bottle of Harvey's sherry! (It's Christmas) finally on the housing front $30k is fair and at TC you will get something of reasonable size, however I sincerely doubt it would be anywhere near the size of what you are used to. Come out to HK, do a recce, manage your expectations before you get here. You can do it on the $$ you have been talking about but it won't be the flash expat lifestyle many come expecting.


  7. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Mid Levels
    Posts
    71

    The last time I checked, you were saying OP's salary is not be enough. Why worry him with BS advise? I have seen families that moved from the UK and living on 60K comfortably.


    Quote Originally Posted by bargfeldstegen:
    Don't listen to what others are saying?! So, no one except you is allowed to give advice? Pathetic.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Mid Levels
    Posts
    71

    M&M, I have to disagree. Caribbean Coast is not a secluded place nor do you need to hike here. Have you ever been to Caribbean Coast or even Tung Chung for that matter? The shuttle bus is free from the MTR and its a 10min ride. If you choose to walk, it just takes 15 mins. I did my research on CC so I am pretty sure I am 100% sure of what I state.

    And have to seen the expat community here?

    Quote Originally Posted by MandM!:
    Tung Chung Carribean Coast you have a hike or a bus to get to the MTR. Do you really want to move here and isolate yourself?

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    6,317
    Quote Originally Posted by EuroDash:
    M&M, I have to disagree. Caribbean Coast is not a secluded place nor do you need to hike here. Have you ever been to Caribbean Coast or even Tung Chung for that matter? The shuttle bus is free from the MTR and its a 10min ride. If you choose to walk, it just takes 15 mins. I did my research on CC so I am pretty sure I am 100% sure of what I state.

    And have to seen the expat community here?
    Personally I rather be closer to the MTR. Yes, I have been to Caribbean Coast, had some friends live there too, you can check out the new building Visionary. I find food options a bit too limiting in Tung Chung, and I would not want to have to rely on a bus, nor take a bus + MTR.

  10. #20

    Somewhere else you may want to consider is Park island. If you work in Central it's a 25-30 minute ferry ride in, alternatively it's a 15 minute shuttle bus to Tsing Yi or Kwai Fong MTR stations. Lots of families with small children and well within your budget range. I always take the ferry to central, a relaxed way to start the morning opposed to the mad rush at MTR stations. Great club facilities, small beach and some (but limited) local and western restaurants and local shops (and a large Fusion supermarket).


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