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July Move: Typical Settlement Questions.

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  1. #21

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terreneuve
    I am a home owner, so I am in a property owner's shoes .
    Well in that case, put yourself into an asian owner's multi-million dollar shoes, and think again.

  2. #22

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    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by locust.fund
    Well in that case, put yourself into an asian owner's multi-million dollar shoes, and think again.
    Not sure what the income of the owner has to do with anything? My "home" (which I've worked on with my own blood and sweat) is equally if not more valuable to me than to someone who is doing it solely as an investment or "income property"*.

    And I certainly have zero empathy for those that are in the real estate market as speculators, those that turned Hong Kong into a place where home ownership has left so many behind, then moved on to Vancouver and Toronto and helped make them unaffordable cities for renters and buyers alike. Getting a bit off topic but my 2 cents.

    But seriously, if anyone could recommend an agent or agency please post or PM me!


    *BTW I'm also a landlord.

  3. #23

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terreneuve
    Not sure what the income of the owner has to do with anything? My "home" (which I've worked on with my own blood and sweat) is equally if not more valuable to me than to someone who is doing it solely as an investment or "income property"*.

    And I certainly have zero empathy for those that are in the real estate market as speculators, those that turned Hong Kong into a place where home ownership has left so many behind, then moved on to Vancouver and Toronto and helped make them unaffordable cities for renters and buyers alike. Getting a bit off topic but my 2 cents.

    But seriously, if anyone could recommend an agent or agency please post or PM me!


    *BTW I'm also a landlord.
    YES, we know you are a landlord ALREADY.

    And no, it has nothing to do with "the income of the (local) owner", it's about asian (local Chinese) mentality.

    Since I've noticed that you like to give and receive information bluntly, I will do exactly that: Hong Kong house owners don't like pets. They don't like to rent to people who own pets.

    I think it is moot for any of you to continue arguing with me on this topic if you were not born and raised here.

  4. #24

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    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by locust.fund
    YES, we know you are a landlord ALREADY.

    And no, it has nothing to do with "the income of the (local) owner", it's about asian (local Chinese) mentality.

    Since I've noticed that you like to give and receive information bluntly, I will do exactly that: Hong Kong house owners don't like pets. They don't like to rent to people who own pets.

    I think it is moot for any of you to continue arguing with me on this topic if you were not born and raised here.
    Ah, OK... it seemed to imply that due to their fancy shoes they had somehow earned additional consideration.

    I said I was a homeowner, I hadn't disclosed half my home was an income property. When I leave I'll be the landlord of two places (lots of fun to be sure).

    I appreciate your bluntness , but doesn't your point "They don't like to rent to people who own pets." seem to support my argument about not bringing it up at all? As rather than deal with me they'll move on to the non-pet person, so couldn't the disclosure cost me the denial of a decent apartment?

    Not trying to aggravate, just clarify.

    Cheers

  5. #25

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terreneuve
    I appreciate your bluntness , but doesn't your point "They don't like to rent to people who own pets." seem to support my argument about not bringing it up at all? As rather than deal with me they'll move on to the non-pet person, so couldn't the disclosure cost me the denial of a decent apartment?

    Not trying to aggravate, just clarify.

    Cheers
    Sigh... Please check response no.4, point 5 of this post. I have been consistently propounding NOT TO disclose your dear cat since the beginning.

    Lying by omission is okay. I mean that, really, especially in a place like HK.
    Terreneuve likes this.

  6. #26

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    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tuen Mun
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    I think locust.fund and I live in parallel universes. I've never had any problem with landlords and cats - in village houses cats are often very welcome because the very scent of them scares rats away!
    Terreneuve, just letting you know that one of the issues here can be that rats do thrive in the subtropical climate here, specially with all the nice juicy fruits and insects around village areas (not to mention rubbish stations which aren't carefully tended). Fortunately the snakes manage the population outdoors.


  7. #27

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    Dec 2013
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    If you are coming from a western country, "village houses" in Hong Kong can be quite a shock. They are not villages in the same way you would see in the west. You really need to check out the village in person and ask around. Some have "difficult" village heads (mafia basically); dog problems, parking issues. Some have truly scary access for ambulance and fire trucks. While I personally hate the idea of a high rise with a passion, I do think you need to look for yourself when you arrive. You may be better off keeping a more open mind about what kind of place you want until you get here and actually see it all in person.

    Re the online sites - complete rubbish. Plus they doctor photos, so that anything you have seen is likely not real (I don't mean touch up the colours, I mean delete entire apartment blocks that are blocking the view etc etc!).

    kimwy66 likes this.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    247

    In relation to agents, I recommend getting here on the ground and going to the local agencies. It is very hard to do this ahead of time, unless you have a relocation company. I looked online and fell into the trap. Spend 2 days looking at places that did not meet my requirements. Walked into a local agency in the area I wanted to live in, and found a place the same day.

    Have a look at the classifieds here as I find them quite reasonable. I did not look on this website when I first moved here, which is a regret.

    I have relocated before and in many countries you can prepare quite a lot before landing on the ground. HK is not one of those places.

    i should also mention that I had issues getting enough money to HK in order to pay the deposit. My overseas bank has a daily limit, and I had to make many trips and get a cash advance from my company in order to make the deposit. So I recommend you at least sort that out. Whether you increase the limit on your overseas account, or perhaps get one of those travel cards.

    Terreneuve likes this.

  9. #29

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    Oct 2014
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    2,803

    There are a few agencies that if you email them saying your needs and budget, they will send you a list of real current avail abilities which almost always differ to what they have on their websites. You can try OKAY.com, contact them and ask to get connected to an agent who covers your area. I'm sure there are better local agencies but I don't know that area so can't suggest, OKAY.com covers all of HK though.

    Terreneuve likes this.

  10. #30

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    Sep 2016
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    280
    Quote Originally Posted by HK_Katherine
    If you are coming from a western country, "village houses" in Hong Kong can be quite a shock. They are not villages in the same way you would see in the west. You really need to check out the village in person and ask around. Some have "difficult" village heads (mafia basically); dog problems, parking issues. Some have truly scary access for ambulance and fire trucks. While I personally hate the idea of a high rise with a passion, I do think you need to look for yourself when you arrive. You may be better off keeping a more open mind about what kind of place you want until you get here and actually see it all in person.
    I agree. From a western perspective, high-rises stand for crime and poor people. In Hong Kong its actually the opposite. Living in high-rises has tons of benefits compared to village houses, and there is a reason why it costs a bit more per sq ft (in general). Give high-rises a try!
    Terreneuve likes this.

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