Like Tree33Likes

ABC (american born chinese) planning to move to HK

Reply
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    2,001

    Definitely make at least one exploratory trip first. See where the in-laws are living - middle class local families conisder it normal to fit 3 generations into 400' sq.
    Check out the environment - unless you can be self-employed or work from home, the usual pay-off for living in a relatively green area would be a long commute to the office. Air pollution is an issue, specially in winter - the rest of the year it's the humidity.
    Have a look at the prices of western groceries and western restaurants - 99% of what we eat here is imported, and it shows (along with local rent levels) in the prices. Or how prepared would you be to return to your roots and eat local long term?

    I'm not saying "don't come and live here with a family", but it's true that the grass looks greener on the other side of the fence wherever you are, so you need to move - or not - with your eyes wide open.

    z754103 and Titus like this.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by ceoisme:
    I've moved back from the States nearly 7-8 years ago, immediately after my college so I haven't worked F/T in the States before and unaware if this happens ANYWHERE in the world. I'm never a competitive person and quite naive to believe one can meet friends at work. Well, after many years of working in HK, I feel colleagues always stay at colleagues for a reason. Not sure if it's just me...or this is normal?
    You can see the work culture from the above comment
    Mrs. Jones likes this.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    2,263

    Honestly, Hong Kong is very much a young person's place. It's fun, it's exciting, it's dynamic. It's a work hard, play hard culture.

    But this is why its not a great idea at your stage of life and career. For a young family, you probably prefer a more stable lifestyle, and it is also quite expensive and challenging to live here as people have mentioned especially with schools.

    Maybe 5 years ago, i would have told you to definitely go for it. When maybe you are more willing to try new things, perhaps start lower down and have time to learn and grow.

    However, many of the BBCs and ABCs I've known are doing the opposite to you. They came here fairly early, but once they marry or start a family, they go back to the UK, USA or Australia because they have better conditions for a family.

    WMDS likes this.

  4. #24

    The local cultures will have little to do with OP if he is the type of Overseas Chinese who can't speak and read Cantonese.
    Most likely he will not work in local companies and have a deep friendship with locals due to language and cultural barriers. You need to be able to understand the language well to understand HK jokes and cultures.

    Foreigners and western Chinese in HK usually have different stories and cultures from the locals. The divide between Cantonese, Mandarin and English mother tongue speakers is so great in Hong Kong, they don't mix well and all have their own social circles. Our local hang outs like cheap restaurants, churches and activity groups are clearly divided by languages.

    Titus likes this.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    889

    Have you thought of moving somewhere else within the US? I have heard from Americans and New Yorkers who said NYC in itself is quite different from the rest of the country especially the west coast which is more laid back. Maybe if you're looking for a change in environment for yourself and family try within the US first at least it's easier with your work and salary history there?

    I agree and disagree with others on the schooling. It's only as competitive as you allow others to make for you (people like me who permanently black lists showboaters in family and friends who brag about their 6 years old being the next Einstein or getting into some posh school); I have not heard of a single kid who "has no school to go to" and whatever issue they have at school you can work out with the teachers through dialogue. It's the parents who puts their kids through 4 hours of tutoring 7 days a week so that their kids become the top 1% in the class who destroys their kids' life not the school system IMO. Where ever there are large western population, like Sai Kung district, I heard the local schools there offer more English language instructions to help English speaking families (not all westerners in HK are posh and the HK government does a lot to meet the needs of these families you just have to ask and dig around for some info) so it's not an automatic international school situation.

    IMO the good side of your kid being still 10 months old is that you can afford to make a leap and it won't affect them as much in uprooting their friends and other relationships. If you have a place to stay in HK and have savings, go for it. Whatever you do, stick with it and don't look back and certainly don't do the "I wish..." down the road it becomes toxic for a lot of people I know who wished they didn't move to HK or they wish they DID move to HK


  6. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    51

    Your background is exactly like my husband, he moved here form NYC just last summer after we got married. I'm a local (not ethnically Chinese). He's with finance background as well, took him 10 months to finally find a job. Now he's with a start-up training tech professional on data science/AI. We don't have a kid yet but I think you can manage if your wife is a local and her fam is here, you just have to know its going to be a bit of a struggle for about a year till you get settled in job and new lifestyle.

    You can PM me if you would like to speak to my husband.

    Gpang likes this.

  7. #27

    Took 1 year finding jobs is not rare, know many locals took 0.5 to 1,5 years to get a job after studying overseas. Sad thing is not the time they took getting jobs but they may not like their first jobs in HK. Mostly they don't like the long hours, work cultures in that company or the people in it.


  8. #28

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    2,263
    Quote Originally Posted by lighthse003:
    Took 1 year finding jobs is not rare, know many locals took 0.5 to 1,5 years to get a job after studying overseas. Sad thing is not the time they took getting jobs but they may not like their first jobs in HK. Mostly they don't like the long hours, work cultures in that company or the people in it.
    I think this depends a bit on attitude and is only when they feel entitled. Many locals who studied abroad are actually very well qualified and should have no problems finding jobs. It's just whether they are willing to accept what is available.

    I know the types you mention who waste a whole year looking for the perfect job in their field of study. But then i also know a few of the get up and do types who are willing to work hard at jobs which they may not like, may not be particularly interested in, have low pay.

    Lets face it, none of them stayed at the first or even second companies they worked with. But those who view everything as an opportunity tend to do a bit better in life and complain less about it.

Reply
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3