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Tips and advice for blending in easier after moving to Hong Kong

  1. #11

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    Aug 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerSun
    HaaaHaaa, so true. I always remember the American poster trying find how to get his/her Charmin toilet tissue... really?... toilet tissue?
    Perhaps a table of leading FMCG's that are regional in nature

    USA / Canada v Europe / UK v Australia v HK

    Painkillers
    Advil v Nurofen v Nurofen v Ibuprofen

    sarsaparilla flavoured soda
    A&W v Dandelion and burdock v Bundaberg Root Beer v Sarsae

  2. #12

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    I always brought a stash of TP back from my home visits. The U.S. has lost it's edge in many things but it's still #1 for paper products.


  3. #13

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    Apr 2012
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    850
    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiaque
    Ah! I forgot...



    Can we PLEASE stop saying Hong Kong is "fast pace" and "watch out"! YES you should watch out, but not because it's face paced, but because it's SLOW paced and too crowded. I've never seen a bigger bunch of sloths on pavements...
    I was going to say the same thing. It's not just in the street, it's everywhere. Everything is slow, immigration, government entities taking ages to get back to you, people who never follow up if you ask for more than one thing etc.... They're slow at work because they need to still till the boss is done, so they slack around.

    One thing to blend with locals is work ethic, there are rules but nobody respects them or there are workarounds for almost everything.

    And people here don't know how to operate emails, if they do don't expect any immediate answer (even if it means business for them).
    MerMer likes this.

  4. #14

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    Feb 2008
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    Why duo you have to be so rude he/she is just trying to be helpful. Your name is most appropriate.


  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by midorosan
    Why duo you have to be so rude he/she is just trying to be helpful. Your name is most appropriate.
    Please use the quote button so we know who you are talking to

  6. #16

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    Oct 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plutark
    Everything is slow, immigration, government entities taking ages to get back to you,
    Really? I have found Hong Kong to be very efficient. Immigration is much faster compared to other countries I’ve been and a person actually answers phone calls and gives real answers within a few minutes. I called the government hotline to complain about a pot hole in front of my building and it was fixed within a week. A weird smell was coming from a gutter and someone called me back and set an appointment to meet me there to show/explain it to him within 2 days. Maybe it depends on the department but my experiences have been pretty good.
    chingleutsch likes this.

  7. #17

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    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmRa6
    Really? I have found Hong Kong to be very efficient. Immigration is much faster compared to other countries I’ve been and a person actually answers phone calls and gives real answers within a few minutes. I called the government hotline to complain about a pot hole in front of my building and it was fixed within a week. A weird smell was coming from a gutter and someone called me back and set an appointment to meet me there to show/explain it to him within 2 days. Maybe it depends on the department but my experiences have been pretty good.
    I agree about this. Compared to the US or UK, you'll delight in how some government departments work in Hong Kong...

    But EPD, rural areas.... different ballgame. Our government doesn't like confrontation with people they perceive to have "power". That's when things get "slow".
    shri and chuckster007 like this.

  8. #18

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    Aug 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plutark
    I was going to say the same thing. It's not just in the street, it's everywhere. Everything is slow, immigration, government entities taking ages to get back to you, people who never follow up if you ask for more than one thing etc.... They're slow at work because they need to still till the boss is done, so they slack around.
    What countries are you comparing with? I've generally been impressed with the speed and responsiveness of government services here.

    I reported a dangerous tree branch a couple weeks back (believe it or not there's a dedicated hotline number for that) and within a week received an email that the branch had been removed.

  9. #19

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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    What countries are you comparing with? I've generally been impressed with the speed and responsiveness of government services here.

    I reported a dangerous tree branch a couple weeks back (believe it or not there's a dedicated hotline number for that) and within a week received an email that the branch had been removed.
    I should have precised. I'm not comparing to the US or UK etc...

    I'm comparing it to let's say Singapore for example, they have a way more efficient system. The immigration is fast in some instances, like renewing visa or even replacing an ID card. But if you're a startup it can take ages to get people in, we're talking about a city that likes to think it's the main startup hub in Asia.
    Another one is entrepreneur visa, I know someone who wanted to set up his company here and hire around 15 people. They told him it will take around 4 months to get his entrepreneur visa approved, even though he's got enough money to sustain the business for years. 4 months in business is not fast, it's heffing slow.

    The point I'm trying to make is, when you are a country with full employment, massive surplus, you could at least invest in making the government entities more efficient. I just can't get my head around why none of their websites have been updated since the late 90s. Even the inland revenue advising to use internet explorer.....

    Also the slowness in adapting to technology and open data. If you compare the data portal in HK compared to Singapore (or the rest of the world for that matter), it is very poor. Having open data could benefit everyone since people could then build a useful application for residents, instead of having the government spending hundreds of millions (contract given to their friends) for broken apps.
    jgl and Elegiaque like this.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    83

    Here are a few helpful ones:

    For transport, you must get an Octopus Card. Not only that, it can be used in a lot of shops, cinemas etc.
    Queues, be prepared for Queues. If you're a female be prepared to queue for toilets.
    Learn the Chinese festivals, such as CNY (giving out lai see/receiving), Mid-Autumn (mooncakes) etc etc
    Chinese customs/culture

    Elegiaque likes this.

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