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Tips and advice for blending in easier after moving to Hong Kong

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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    1,499
    Quote Originally Posted by DimSumBond
    Neither are Asian enough for me.

    Asia is the Sinosphere + Japan (aka orientals). Basically Chopstick countries. These are safer than Western and European countries by far. I have no comments about TH and PH and they are worlds apart from the Oriental nations anways.

    A bunch of sensitive people on here.

    Guess Laughing too much is pretty silly, eh? I'm having a laugh now.

    Leave your pride at home please.
    When I want to do some trolling, I'll have to revisit your posts for inspiration

    Ah yes Japan with it's peaceful history is an excellent example of a pacific nation and who doesn't enjoy the fairy tale stories of the khmer rouge or the kumbaya moments of the chinese revolution. And then there are the local triads who convince people not to cross them with flowers on their meat cleaversOh wait triads must just be legends...

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    1,499
    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    Well done for rewriting geography. What continent does India belong to then for example?

    Stupidity knows no bounds.
    They don't use chopsticks, it doesn't count

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyhook
    Let me be a bit blunt.

    No matter how long you live in Hong Kong, and I lived there for 46% of my life, you will never be accepted as a local etc.
    Language is an important issue here. If a person can't speak the predominant language of a country fluently, I think it's impossible for him to be 'accepted as a local' in that country. You talk about the 'multicultural' Australia, but then do you notice almost everyone is speaking English? If you are an Asian living in Australia and don't speak any English, will you feel 'accepted as a local'? I'm doubtful about this.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    503
    Quote Originally Posted by kungpaochicken
    Language is an important issue here. If a person can't speak the predominant language of a country fluently, I think it's impossible for him to be 'accepted as a local' in that country. You talk about the 'multicultural' Australia, but then do you notice almost everyone is speaking English? If you are an Asian living in Australia and don't speak any English, will you feel 'accepted as a local'? I'm doubtful about this.
    bullshit

    Who deserves to be local is subjective since the Chinese go by racial hierarchy. Caucasians born in hk/ long-term residents are proudly seen as Hong kongers whereas majority of HK born Cantonese speaking 'south Asians' , barring a handful who've been really lucky , are treated like third class citizens.

    And I also dont give a flying f*ck about 'saving face' cultural shit because it is nothing but arrogance. During one of the family cny dinners this year, my father in law (local Chinese) asked me to drink to which I politely declined since I was on antibiotics those days. Apparently he had 'lost face' on front of others and complained to my wife as if I cared. Gone are the days when it was necessary to do as the Romans did. There are aspects of Chinese culture I really admire, like hard work and family bonding, but I don't bow down to illogical cultural shit, no matter how severe the backlash.
    Skyhook and MerMer like this.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaz Paul
    bullshit

    Who deserves to be local is subjective since the Chinese go by racial hierarchy. Caucasians born in hk/ long-term residents are proudly seen as Hong kongers whereas majority of HK born Cantonese speaking 'south Asians' , barring a handful who've been really lucky , are treated like third class citizens.

    And I also dont give a flying f*ck about 'saving face' cultural shit because it is nothing but arrogance. During one of the family cny dinners this year, my father in law (local Chinese) asked me to drink to which I politely declined since I was on antibiotics those days. Apparently he had 'lost face' on front of others and complained to my wife as if I cared. Gone are the days when it was necessary to do as the Romans did. There are aspects of Chinese culture I really admire, like hard work and family bonding, but I don't bow down to illogical cultural shit, no matter how severe the backlash.
    Why are you ranting your personal unpleasant experience that is totally irrelevant to this very topic? I assume Skyhook is a Caucasian and he's not feeling like a local in Hong Kong, so I'm offering an explanation. I'm talking about whether someone can feel like a local here, and you're talking about 'classes of citizens'. You can feel like a local and a third class citizen at the same time. Many local HKers feel like they are second class citizens compared to Caucasians and rich mainland Chinese. This feeling has nothing to do with whether you feel like a local or not.

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