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Is it Wise to Leave School in US mid-semester to move to HK for 9 months?

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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiaque
    But he won't miss his parent? Because he doesn't love his parent?

    Sounds like this is something you have to work out with your spouse, not Geo.

    I find it really amazing that people find broken glass so "scary". As if a lack of freedom of speech or losing your job because you supported the wrong side weren't really scary.
    @Elegiaque, of course he will miss his parent. We’re still trying to work this out as we are on opposite ends of the spectrum about this. I am asking for opinions to see what other families would do and what their points of view would be. Am I being too radical in terms of kid to stay in one place or should he jump from place to place as we’ve been doing for the past two pre-k years? How is this going to affect the kid’s emotional and psychological stability? friends and family all say it will affect any kid but he doesn’t believe it. I know it’s long term and it won’t be seen until a lot older. I just wonder what people from other locations and culture would do. He’s from HK and I’m from US, both Chinese speaking Cantonese.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elegiaque
    In my (irrelevant) opinion, the OP should stay home. I just think it's a great opportunity for the kids/family to learn about why people are chanting "scarily" and breaking glass. Neither hurts the bystander, but are really important.

    True about walking on eggshells.
    Dad allows our 6 year old to watch the protests on the news at night. We also encountered protests the day after the airport was closed down. We heard chanting in the arrivals hall before they came upstairs to the departures hall. our plane was one of the last planes to leave HK. It was just me and my kid leaving. He was really scared of the protests in the airport as the chanting got louder.

    Thank you for your relevant opinion.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    There is almost no chance OP’s son will be able to join a Chinese or bilingual kindy for 6 months starting in Jan. The types of places that will take him are like Woodlands which is English. Which is why in their situation I don’t think it will add any value to bring him here to join an international kindy.

    If it were a few years then that’s a different story. Or if the child were younger not already started primary school. It’s just too disruptive for limited upside. They can come in the summer.
    @merchantms,
    I agree. Since we speak Cantonese, although I speak a different (not Mandarin) Chinese dialect and I can speak a little Cantonese, our son never picked up any Chinese. In fact, he learned some Spanish in preschool and would rather stick with that because Buzz Lightyear speaks it in Toy Story series. I would love for him to learn to speak Cantonese and write traditional Chinese.

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by librarygirl2
    Dad allows our 6 year old to watch the protests on the news at night. We also encountered protests the day after the airport was closed down. We heard chanting in the arrivals hall before they came upstairs to the departures hall. our plane was one of the last planes to leave HK. It was just me and my kid leaving. He was really scared of the protests in the airport as the chanting got louder.
    Is it common for 6 year olds to watch the news unfiltered? Especially if it's to do with violent protest action in the same city?

    My kids don't watch the news, and any verbal explanation of the protests are carefully prepared for a young child in simple and non-threatening words (we had to explain to one child why his flight was delayed by almost a week, and expected protests when he got to the airport).

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl
    Is it common for 6 year olds to watch the news unfiltered? Especially if it's to do with violent protest action in the same city?

    My kids don't watch the news, and any verbal explanation of the protests are carefully prepared for a young child in simple and non-threatening words (we had to explain to one child why his flight was delayed by almost a week, and expected protests when he got to the airport).
    I have never filtered the news for my kids or stopped them watching it.
    Kowloon Goon and jgl like this.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile
    I have never filtered the news for my kids or stopped them watching it.
    I do. They don't need to know about rapes and murders yet. When they're teenagers it will be a different story but not for primary school children.
    Kowloon Goon, jgl and librarygirl2 like this.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrit
    I do. They don't need to know about rapes and murders yet. When they're teenagers it will be a different story but not for primary school children.
    To be honest the last thing they wanted to watch was the news, watching cartoon animals getting squashed, sliced and flattened was much more fun. Or just playing. Or reading. I wouldn't turn the TV off or change channel though. They all SEEM to have survived psychologically undamaged.
    MABinPengChau likes this.

  8. #68

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    @jgl,

    I used to watch the news when I was 6 but the news back in the day was not as violent as they are nowadays. They would always warn you that it was not going to be comfortable to watch before they showed footage and even then the footage was not as violent or gruesome as it is nowadays.


  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by jgl

    My kids don't watch the news, and any verbal explanation of the protests are carefully prepared for a young child in simple and non-threatening words (we had to explain to one child why his flight was delayed by almost a week, and expected protests when he got to the airport).
    Surprisingly high on the list of ways-that-the-protests-have-complicated our lives: having to explain to our previously police-loving kid why, every time we get on the MTR, the news reel is showing footage of police beating people up.

    We don't watch the news at home b/c we don't have a tv, but yeah. Hard to escape it.

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