University in HK

Reply
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    36

    University in HK

    Hey,

    I've been searching and noticed some of you are studying in HK and inevitably others of you have in the past...
    I was surprised to learn yesterday that HK international student fees are low - not much more expensive than it would be to go to uni locally.
    I have a few questions that I hope someone wouldn't mind answering...

    Is the English degree offered by HKU/CUHK markedly inferior to English degrees I would find here in England? Would employers recognise this (if it is true)? Or is this simply an unfounded fear?
    Which is better - HKU or CUHK?
    How easy would it be for me to integrate into the university life? I'm English...and it seems that I might end up feeling left out quite often due to cultural reasons. I'll make a sincere effort to learn as much of the language as I can before I come out, but is that enough?
    What are the international student populations of these universities like? I can't find any references on the websites.

    Just as a sidenote - I mainly want this degree so I can get on the NET scheme, and to open up opportunities in EFL and work generally. I also don't want to go to university here...I would choose instead to do a part-time degree through distance learning whilst working abroad.

    Thanks.


  2. #2

    You don't really need to have a local degree to get on the NET scheme.. if you're a native speaker, I think it's better to study English in England.

    Cheers,
    Blom


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    36

    Thanks for your reply.

    The thing is, I don't want to go to university...but I'm beginning to see how necessary it is. Combining this necessary evil with three years in HK seems to be a very good compromise (though I would naturally visit first before making that kind of commitment).
    I understand that the English degrees offered at top universities here are probably going to be better, but to what extent? I've spent hours trying to dig up information on this but found nothing. I guess it's a pretty obscure thing to find information on.
    As long as I'm not handicapping my job chances by doing it, then that's the most important thing to me. Are the courses pitched at a lower level to account for the fact that English is a second language in HK, or are the students assumed to have the same language ability as a native speaker?

    Just because this smiley rocks, I have to use it:


  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Pampanga, Philippines
    Posts
    27,000

    English

    I would be careful about studying at undergraduate degree level here unless your Cantonese is at a reasonable level. It may be different in the Universities but the courses we run at a local college (final year of degree) are supposed to be in English but I know they often revert to Cantonese - which is understandable. At postgrad level it might be different.


  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    11

    HKU or CU

    HKU is better for you. It's more international and English is its official teaching/learning language.

    There are many non-local students including exchange students, non-local undergraduates/postgraduates (not sure about the actual number though).

    Adjusting to local life won't be hard. You can make friends with local students who are happy to learn different culture and practice their English. Non-local students and expats are definately good choices as well.


  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    KT South of the Tracks
    Posts
    742

    Your right, its about the same cost to study in the UK as it is in HK...

    HKU teaches in English which means that in class people have to use english - but not to talk to each other, and you have to understand that HK isnt like Scandianavia etc, just because you cant speak cantonese doesnt mean that your classmates will speak in english, even when you are in a group etc, and just because your miles from home and on your own, it doesnt mean that they will make any attempt to include you. This isnt a racial thing, I know quite a few ABC/BBC/CBC who get the same thing, its just a cultural thing.

    There is a veritable chasm of 'cultural difference' between China and Europe, so bare in mind that you wont get treated like a foreign kid would in the UK or anywhere in Europe. Ok, thats the negative out of the way.

    Living in HK is well worth the experience, though 3 years is a very long time to commit to, espeacilly if youve never spent anytime here or abroad in general. The course will be a walk in the park as educational standards here seem to be much much lower than in the UK. I.e. on a postgrad course here you can turn in work of average 'A' level standard and easily get a B, turning up and writing your name on the paper should secure you a pass.

    However, few people know this outside of HK, so thats not really a problem, unless your looking for a degree that represents some kind of achievement for yourself! You shouldnt struggle to make a few friends on your course and expats are all very friendly here so maknig friends wont be a problem, esp if you go into halls (if u can deal with no 'other sex' visitors or alcohol and compulsory events)

    At the end of the day, there aren't many people who wouldnt value the experiences gained from going and living aborad, and studying is a good time to be abroad... You can earn good money teaching here, butyou CANNOT WORK ON A STUDENT VISA, or even do volunteer work. That said, if your willing to risk it there are plenty of places that will hire you anway for P/T, or there is always private tutoring.

    One option might be to register yourself as a company in the UK and then route your earnings though the UK... not sure if thats legal, but it might be. Personally, I would think about doing an exchange year here instead. Your get a better education that way. Incidently, whilst the UK is moving towards 1year masters, HK is moving towards 3yr masters...


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    I would be careful about studying at undergraduate degree level here unless your Cantonese is at a reasonable level. It may be different in the Universities but the courses we run at a local college (final year of degree) are supposed to be in English but I know they often revert to Cantonese - which is understandable. At postgrad level it might be different.
    Really? Ouch...that could be problematic.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by muimui:
    HKU is better for you. It's more international and English is its official teaching/learning language.

    There are many non-local students including exchange students, non-local undergraduates/postgraduates (not sure about the actual number though).

    Adjusting to local life won't be hard. You can make friends with local students who are happy to learn different culture and practice their English. Non-local students and expats are definately good choices as well.
    Thanks.
    I noticed from their website CUHK are making a big push to become really international, and they want their international student population to reach 25%. I guess the reality doesn't meet the wish.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Laughing_Monkey:
    Your right, its about the same cost to study in the UK as it is in HK...
    I wonder why that is...they don't subsidise for international students aswell do they? A year ago I was looking to study in the US, but it would have cost me £100,000 in total!

    HKU teaches in English which means that in class people have to use english - but not to talk to each other, and you have to understand that HK isnt like Scandianavia etc, just because you cant speak cantonese doesnt mean that your classmates will speak in english, even when you are in a group etc, and just because your miles from home and on your own, it doesnt mean that they will make any attempt to include you. This isnt a racial thing, I know quite a few ABC/BBC/CBC who get the same thing, its just a cultural thing.
    Yeah, I can imagine that. I plan to take Cantonese classes first, so hopefully that should help. SOAS here in London seem reputable.

    There is a veritable chasm of 'cultural difference' between China and Europe, so bare in mind that you wont get treated like a foreign kid would in the UK or anywhere in Europe. Ok, thats the negative out of the way.

    Living in HK is well worth the experience, though 3 years is a very long time to commit to, espeacilly if youve never spent anytime here or abroad in general. The course will be a walk in the park as educational standards here seem to be much much lower than in the UK. I.e. on a postgrad course here you can turn in work of average 'A' level standard and easily get a B, turning up and writing your name on the paper should secure you a pass.
    Really? I'm surprised about that. I thought HKs educational standards were at least equal to the UK.

    However, few people know this outside of HK, so thats not really a problem, unless your looking for a degree that represents some kind of achievement for yourself! You shouldnt struggle to make a few friends on your course and expats are all very friendly here so maknig friends wont be a problem, esp if you go into halls (if u can deal with no 'other sex' visitors or alcohol and compulsory events)
    I'm torn about it...to be honest, it's probably a good thing. I'll just have to think about it.
    I was looking at the halls...most of them are mixed gender in HKU. You have to share a room though, which is a bit of a pain...but I can live with that.

    At the end of the day, there aren't many people who wouldnt value the experiences gained from going and living aborad, and studying is a good time to be abroad... You can earn good money teaching here, butyou CANNOT WORK ON A STUDENT VISA, or even do volunteer work. That said, if your willing to risk it there are plenty of places that will hire you anway for P/T, or there is always private tutoring.
    Yep, I saw that. It is unfortunate...although there are plenty of places that do international student loans...I think interest free.

    One option might be to register yourself as a company in the UK and then route your earnings though the UK... not sure if thats legal, but it might be. Personally, I would think about doing an exchange year here instead. Your get a better education that way. Incidently, whilst the UK is moving towards 1year masters, HK is moving towards 3yr masters...
    That's quite cunning.
    3yr masters?
    Hmm...I'll have to think about that. I'm not rushing into anything, I won't be going until 2007...which will make me 21, but nevermind. Better late than never. Lots to think about.
    Thanks for your time.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    KT South of the Tracks
    Posts
    742
    Really? I'm surprised about that. I thought HKs educational standards were at least equal to the UK.

    So did I! Opps! Its hard to say why this is, but its probably something to do with the maturity of the average HK student and what is considered 'efficient' in the work place...

    Anyway, there is a reason that the UK unis (Cambridge, Oxford, Kings, UCL etc) think that their students can do a masters in one year and HKU/CUHK/HKBU etc think theirstudents near three years.... <sigh>

    SOAS

    yerh, cant get a whole lot better than SOAS, if you hang out in the union there you are bound to meet people from this part of the world as well, though I wouldnt stay in there too long if you've got classes, the 'atmosphere' can make concentration hard afterwards...

    Alternatively try ULU they run all sorts of courses (open to the general public as well as ul students), or look in the standard etc. There will also no doubt be students looknig to earn a bit of cash though teaching languages - though foreign students can work legally on a UK student visa...

    Cost

    For some bizarre reason it costs more to be a local part time student than an international full time student. Its prob because there arent enough international students for them to see it as a viable source of revenue, unlike the uk uni's.....

    Halls

    Mixed Gender... different floors.....

    Anyway, studying abroad opens a lot of doors and provides you with a whole lot of new experiences. If your not looking at accredited courses, (i.e. RIBA accred etc.) then you mgiht also wanna consider Singapore etc (english is meant to be better and more wide spread there) or europe -

Reply
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast