High school student

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  1. #11

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    Jul 2006
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    Very many thxs Green tea, kevin and z75
    Very good tips! Actually I wrote in my letter presenting myself that I use to be out quite alot with friends.
    But of course I will spend much time with my family since I want them to get something from inviting me

    Any special sport of hong kong or china that's populuar?

    is chinese medium the high school?

    I usualy get along with asians quite well here.. sort of live in the "china town" of stockholm, so I hope things will go well there also.

    and z75.. about that smiling... what should I do if they ignore me? should I speak to them even so, and smile?
    If someone did that to me when I dissed them I would think it to be quite irritating:P

    well well.

    About music.. I'm a guitarist, do you have bands, or musik rooms in someway in HK? is it common, or just a western thing?

    Is it a bad behaivior to go to a party, if not, is it a bad behaiviour to drink just a little, social drinking, not get drunk.

    Can I speak with my family about everything? Or are something taboo subjekts at home?
    What are a boy expected to do at home? IN my home I clean and cook sometimes. Walk the dog. What's the usual work set up in chinese homes?

    important question here:
    Do youths in HK have sex? Where in that case? Since homes are a bit crowded.
    Swedes have it at their personal romes, americans in their cars, but where in the world does it happen i HK?

    Thxs again!


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    763

    Common consideration always works, as does common sense.

    Help as much around the house as you can. Watch what the other family members are doing (especially the mother) and help them with those tasks. They'll politely tell you not to bother, but keep insisting and tell them you're used to this at home. Your offers of help willl be well taken and after a couple of weeks they'll stop being polite and let you help. Clean and tidy up after yourself, it's great you already help out around your house.

    "Any special sport of hong kong or china that's populuar?" like I said, table tennis, soccer and basketball are the most popular. Squash & swimming is also common. Otherwise it depends on what access people have to sporting facilities. Get involved in school sporting clubs and activities to make friends.

    Please note that the HK education system is very competitive so most students do spend anything from 2-5 hours a day on schoolwork, depending on ability, aptitude and which year they're in. How old are you and what form are they putting you in?

    "and z75.. about that smiling... what should I do if they ignore me? should I speak to them even so, and smile?
    If someone did that to me when I dissed them I would think it to be quite irritating:P"
    Apply common sense. I'm not telling you to force people to have conversations with you, just smile at people and greet them when you run into them. They may be too surprised to respond the first few times but eventually they'll think of you as that polite young man and start smilng back. No one will diss you for just smiling at them.

    " Do youths in HK have sex? Where in that case? Since homes are a bit crowded."
    In general not seen as the appropriate thing to do for high school students as they're not yet at the level of maturity to be able to deal well with such encounters. Again, you'll probably worry your host family a lot if you engage in these activities as they'll be concerned for your wellbeing.
    BTW please note that personal space is treated differently here than in the West - it's ok to stand close to or touch your same sex friends but do not touch female friends casually or people will think you're taking advantage of them. You can hug the guys but not the girls. BTW most schooling in HK are through single sex schools - are you going to a co-ed or single sex school?

    "Is it a bad behaivior to go to a party, if not, is it a bad behaiviour to drink just a little, social drinking, not get drunk."
    As another poster said, it depends on the family. Also on the type of party. Ask your host family for their preferences and guidance. Again, generally not a lot of alchohol consumed by high school students. I really would avoid even social drinking unless your host family is specifically inviting you to do so. Alchohol consumption by high school students is usually seen as something unhealthy at such a 'young' age, so you run the risk of worrying them as they will feel responsible for your well being. Light social drinking by university students or working people is fine.

    Why don't you get some Cantonese language tapes and see how much you can pick up ahead of time?

    Also, see if you can contact the school and ask if any of the students in your new class would be interested in emailing before you arrive. The English teacher might be happy to help with such arrangements.


  3. #13

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    Jul 2006
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    2
    QUOTE
    "Are people crazy about blond, tall, causcian, ice-blue-eyed guys there? "


    In fact, you may find that the locals are somewhat racist towards you as a Westerner. Hong Kong is very Chinese! They won't expect you to speak Cantonese (thinking that as a Westerner you simply can't). However, the standards of English in HK are getting worse and worse and it's becomming more and more frustrating for non-locals when dealing with day to day issues. The effect for HK will be that it will lose it's place as an international city (to Singapore) and become Asia's Chinese City rather than Asia's World City!! The impact for you and other Westerners may be that if you really want to manage here and not be constantly frustrated, you must learn Cantonese. At the same time, it would be great if the locals could learn not to comment or laugh when you speak their language in the same way that Westerners don't laugh, correct and comment upon their English!!

    Have fun and good luck.

  4. #14

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    Nov 2005
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    195
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason M:
    QUOTE
    "Are people crazy about blond, tall, causcian, ice-blue-eyed guys there? "


    In fact, you may find that the locals are somewhat racist towards you as a Westerner. Hong Kong is very Chinese! They won't expect you to speak Cantonese (thinking that as a Westerner you simply can't). However, the standards of English in HK are getting worse and worse and it's becomming more and more frustrating for non-locals when dealing with day to day issues. The effect for HK will be that it will lose it's place as an international city (to Singapore) and become Asia's Chinese City rather than Asia's World City!! The impact for you and other Westerners may be that if you really want to manage here and not be constantly frustrated, you must learn Cantonese. At the same time, it would be great if the locals could learn not to comment or laugh when you speak their language in the same way that Westerners don't laugh, correct and comment upon their English!!

    Have fun and good luck.

    touche. sounds like a singaporean is jealous! haha. people are entitled to their opinions. but i think that jason's statement is very untrue.

    just for clarification, in the cases of the locals not responding to you or seemingly racist to you, it's most likely because they're embarassed with their english.

    in addition, i really believe it's a matter of choice when it comes to learning cantonese in hong kong. and i believe you should be open about people commenting on or even laughing at your cantonese. having locals pointing out your weaknesses/flaws in cantonese is really the only way to learn to communicate effectively.

  5. #15

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    Jul 2006
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    "Common consideration always works, as does common sense."

    Yeah, but the common sense are a bit different over there since it's another country.. I would think.

    "BTW most schooling in HK are through single sex schools - are you going to a co-ed or single sex school?"

    I think there will be both boys and girls... at least that's the picture I got of it when getting informed of how the schools they work with are.

    I'm 18 years old. Will prob be placed in the last form. I'll get my results but since I will not be able to use them, "i will not get a diploma" I really wont study myself to death.

    "having locals pointing out your weaknesses/flaws in cantonese is really the only way to learn to communicate effectively."

    yes of course. That's why I'm going there, for the difference. I'll try to adapt.


  6. #16

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    Jun 2005
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    You being an 18 year old Swede my expectation is that you are going to feel as if you are in a class full of 14 or 15 year olds. Kids here (generalising hugely) do seem to mature much later than in other places. Hello Kitty is big amongst 20-something women (not 5-8 year olds as would be in Europe), for example.


  7. #17

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    Dec 2005
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    36

    Z75 has offered some valuable insights and advice here. Spoken like a true teacher! I guess in a nutshell, the message is to use your common sense and be sensitive to the local culture. You are obviously here to learn something about HK's culture or you wouldn't be coming. So don't expect the same cultural habits and values as in your own country and be willing to adapt.
    Yeah, the Hello Kitty thing and the popularity of cartoon characters (even among grown men) is amusing. But the preoccupation with 'cutesy' is better than the obsession with sex in North America, I'd say.


  8. #18

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    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by PDLM:
    You being an 18 year old Swede my expectation is that you are going to feel as if you are in a class full of 14 or 15 year olds. Kids here (generalising hugely) do seem to mature much later than in other places. Hello Kitty is big amongst 20-something women (not 5-8 year olds as would be in Europe), for example.
    Wouldn't that depend on what indicators you are using to assess maturity? Asians looking at the way Western adults behave would also think that they act like 5-8 year olds according to Asian customs, much of the time, if they judge by externalities..
    Last edited by z754103; 07-07-2006 at 01:07 AM.

  9. #19

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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason M:
    Hong Kong is very Chinese!
    Well with 97% of the population being Chinese I'd expect so.

    They won't expect you to speak Cantonese (thinking that as a Westerner you simply can't).
    Well in Japan they expect you to speak Japanese, would you have preferred that? (As a sidenote: all gaijins I've met in Japan who had stayed for a while can speak, read and write fluent Japanese. I guess it's not that hard to learn a foriegn language when your survival depends on it.)

    However, the standards of English in HK are getting worse and worse and it's becomming more and more frustrating for non-locals when dealing with day to day issues.
    It's not that bad. You can't expect native-level but most people know at least rudimentary English. Like greenietea said they are just shy when it comes to actually speaking it.

    The impact for you and other Westerners may be that if you really want to manage here and not be constantly frustrated, you must learn Cantonese.
    Makes sense no matter where you go, doesn't it? Even if you can survive without knowing the local language you'll be missing out a lot.

  10. #20

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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Adamu:
    About music.. I'm a guitarist, do you have bands, or musik rooms in someway in HK? is it common, or just a western thing?
    I wouldn't say it's common (more like a subculture), but it's out there if you look for it. There are local bands. You can find band rooms, most of them are in industrial buildings.
    Is it a bad behaivior to go to a party, if not, is it a bad behaiviour to drink just a little, social drinking, not get drunk.
    Parties are fine; just that local kids don't throw parties very often. They are more into karaoke.
    Can I speak with my family about everything? Or are something taboo subjekts at home?
    Most parents will find it awkward to discuss sex with their kids, if they would discuss it at all.
    Do youths in HK have sex? Where in that case?
    There will be times when no one else is at home. If not there are always love hotels.

    I'd be cautious about bringing girls home if I were you though. Remember, sex is a taboo.

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