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Pre-Kindergarten for 4 year old - Entrance for January 2018

  1. #21

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    Mar 2009
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    517

    Mighty Oaks – Playgroup & Kindergarten in Kennedy Town - Mighty ...
    Mighty Oaks – Playgroup & Kindergarten in Kennedy Town - Mighty Oaks
    Mighty Oaks Nursery & Kindergarten is a trilingual Christian international nursery and kindergarten located in Kennedy Town, one of the top Hong Kong .......

    My 2 year old granddaughter goes there twice a week from 08:30 to 10:30 - it used to be three times a week, but she is attending a sort of "Pre-Nursery" classes right now, and will continue into the Nursery classes soon.

    As I understand it, their "new" year's classes will commence in August and, at present she is taught in English & Cantonese (& I have been here ~40 years & still know only a few words - too hard for me ) The teachers are trilingual - but my granddaughter hasn't picked up Mandarin yet (Any more than I have).

    My SWMBO accompanies her to classes, and I join them at 10:30 and wait whilst my granddaughter tears herself away from the teachers, and we take her to have some take-away Dim-Sum at the local kids' playground at Belcher's Bay before returning her to her home in Kennedy Town.

    The school is bright, shining and new & on a 1st floor walk up the stairs location. I am most impressed with it and the teachers - there was never anything like it when I was a youngster 74 years ago !!

    Thumbs up from me!!


  2. #22

    Join Date
    May 2017
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    16
    Quote Originally Posted by merchantms
    @librarygirl2 Woodlands is all laid out quite clearly on the website Woodland Pre-Schools

    ESF used to be govt funded but now it's an independent school system. It uses the International Baccalaureate curriculum. You can only apply to and attend the ESF campus in your catchment zone, so if you live in Mid Levels depending on location that would probably be Glenealy, Peak, or Bradbury school.

    IMS as mentioned is the only "real" fully accredited Montessori school in HK. They do not list fees online, you have to attend a tour to get that info. Also there is a preschool campus in Mid Levels but the primary school from age 6 is in Stanley which is Southside of HK Island.
    Are the IB curriculum schools supposed to be better? And does it matter if a pre-k or kindergarten student goes to an IB curriculum school for their future? I feel like the answer would be "no". What are the studies on Montessori kids?

  3. #23

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by rani
    ESF schools are all across Hong Kong and they have kindys, primary and secondary schools. I brought up ESF because you need to start thinking about primary schools as well. The deadline to apply for a ESF primary school (and some other schools) 2018 intake is this September 2017.
    Thanks for the warning. This is important as I don't want to miss the deadline.

  4. #24

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. Jones
    Also think long(er) term. What curriculum would you like for your child, IB or not for example. Do you want a strong Chinese programme, then ESF won't be for you, there are only a handful of true 'dual language' schools in Hong Kong. And last but not least, what is your budget, annual school fees here in HK can easily increase anywhere from 5-10% per year also something to take into account, not to mention the very costly debentures at many schools.
    @Mrs. Jones, I don't know if IB is the best curriculum. I just want him to get the best education and be strong in math, science, music and still be able to play a sport well and get the social/emotional intelligence. Is that asking for too much? Both dad, grandparents (on both sides) speak Cantonese but we raised him speaking English because he didn't start speaking on time and we decided to just focus on one language at a time. I would love for him to be immersed in Cantonese at least. Mandarin may be important in the future but none of us speak it in the house nor do any of our relatives. Just Cantonese would be good enough for us. Are the Chinese programmes only in Putonghua (Mandarin)? I don't want to pay $30,000 USD for tuition either. Maybe up to $12 or $13K USD.

  5. #25

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    May 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. Jones
    Also consider Victoria. Strong Chinese programme but quite academic and difficult to get into.:

    https://www.victoria.edu.hk/eng/Prog...lumStreams.php
    @Mrs. Jones, the trilingual stream in the Victoria Educational Organisation looks seriously hard. I would love for my kid to go but he would have to learn an extra two languages. Putonghua needs to be on the back burner for now. Thanks for the link. He couldn't get in anyway since he is monolingual.

  6. #26

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    May 2017
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    @GreenCatalonia, that is so wonderful you spend a lot of time with your granddaughter. I wish my son would spend more time with his both sets of grandparents but my parents live in NY and husband's is in hour away from HK. Yes, Cantonese is hard. Too many tones. You could probably pick up Mandarin a lot faster though. The Mighty Oaks website shows a very nice facility and the About section is really cute with the employees' toddler pictures. I'll keep this one in mind.


  7. #27

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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by librarygirl2
    @GreenCatalonia, that is so wonderful you spend a lot of time with your granddaughter. I wish my son would spend more time with his both sets of grandparents but my parents live in NY and husband's is in hour away from HK. Yes, Cantonese is hard. Too many tones. You could probably pick up Mandarin a lot faster though. The Mighty Oaks website shows a very nice facility and the About section is really cute with the employees' toddler pictures. I'll keep this one in mind.
    As I am 76.5 years old, I want to spend as much time as possible till QMH dissect me for "recycleable" parts & the student's anatomy classes chop me into parts to further their medical knowledge.

    I finish up as a bag of ashes to be dumped into the local ocean - none of this ridiculous Ching Ming / Chung Yeung nonsense for my Anglo-Chinese family.

    On the subject of "learning" Mandarin, the ONLY phase I ever learned (in NYC) when I was pursuing a Taiwanese love was "I love you". But I never got any closer as she couldn't leave her student sister alone in Queen's to come and live with me in (Grotty) Britain.

    Yes, "Mighty Oaks" seems a very good school with a wonderful student to teacher ratio.

    Amelia is always very reluctant to leave after her school-hours 'cos the teachers' cherish all the little "Ankle-biters" so much.

    She loves coming out with her granny & grandpa, but we do, at her tender age of a mere 2 years old, need to get her home latest 13:00 or she'll fall asleep on the bus/trains. She needs her bottle of milk & is soon asleep in the arms of Morpheus for a couple of hours of recovery time.






  8. #28

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    1,117
    Quote Originally Posted by librarygirl2
    Are the IB curriculum schools supposed to be better? And does it matter if a pre-k or kindergarten student goes to an IB curriculum school for their future? I feel like the answer would be "no". What are the studies on Montessori kids?
    I don't think IB schools are supposed to be better. But what is the "best" international school in HK varies from person to person depending on their family's needs. If you know for sure you will return to US/UK/Australia then choosing schools that teach those national curriculums makes sense.

    If you asked what are the "best" schools people would probably say German Swiss International School (UK/German), Hong Kong International School (US), Harrow (UK), maybe Canadian International (IB/Canadian), French International (French/UK), and beyond that will really depend on location, languages needed, etc. So I don't get the sense that IB is considered the "best" in HK.

    But as I mentioned in one of my previous posts, most of the schools I just listed above take children in at 3 or 4 years old so if you're moving in Jan with a 4 year old, you are going to be quite late. That's why ESF is being suggested because you can only apply there a year in advance and the children start at 5.
    Mat and shri like this.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    110

    It's unfortunately a bit late already for Jan 2018 entrance into most schools (I know, this is HK craziness), because they've finished their admissions cycle for 2017/2018 and have already waiting lists established.

    Woodlands and TutorTime are likely the best bets if you're arriving in January. They have schools at opposite ends of Caine Road in Midlevels.

    TutorTime has a much better Mandarin program and I recall was also cheaper than Woodlands. For 4 year-olds, both will be 5 days a week.

    The more important thing to pay attention to is that you need to be looking at getting your child into Primary School for Sept 2018. So make sure you are applying to primary schools in the next few months. For example: ESF Y1 applications for Fall 2018 will probably be due by 30 Sept 2017

    Missing the Primary School deadlines is likely to cause some headaches, unless you don't plan to stay very long.

    International Kindergarten In Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong Kindergarten


  10. #30

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6

    Hi! I'm a local citizen. My son is 4 years old too and he studies at local kindergarten. If you want your child to learn Cantonese, why not enrol him into a local school as most, if not all, bilingual programme at international school are English+Mandarin/Putonghua. However, living in hk, it is still Cantonese dominate in most part of your daily life. There are non-Chinese students studying in my son's kindy and they enjoy a lot. As your husband can speak Cantonese, he can start teaching him bit by bit and tell him that 'we are going to live in HK, where you will meet a lot of new friends, some of them speak Cantonese and you can play with them if you can speak Cantonese well.'

    As you may know, Cantonese has more different tones(9 to be exact) over Mandarin. If your son learned Cantonese, it'd be a lot easier for him to pick up Mandarin at a later stage, but not the other way around.

    For kindergarten, I'm sure you will find a place for your son any time of the year. We're talking about shrinking population of pupils here. Not to mention many would change schools after studying a few months or a year. This musical chair game goes on every year.

    For primary schools, the application for 9/2018 intake has started and will last until around end of September. The minimum age of a primary 1 student is 5yrs 8 mths old. So if your son was born in 2012, he should apply this year. However, if his birthday is between September and December, he can opt to enter primary school the next year ( i.e. until he is biologically full 6 years old). Many local parents would have their children go on this path as that makes their children seemingly to have advantage in learning over others who were nominally a year younger. If your son was born in 2013, then he'll definitely go to primary in 2019. Either way makes your application period into 2018. Still plenty of time.


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