Reply
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4
Like Tree13Likes

Higher Education in Canada

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    323

    American and British degrees have more utility. They are more internationally recognized and in circles that value degrees from certain schools, they value American and British degrees. Easier for such degree holders to get higher paying jobs out of undergrad, although also more volatile as the costs are high and not everyone gets those high paying jobs so economically the degree can be highly costly for the parents.

    That said, I think that the cost aspect of the degree isn't as important of a factor given that raising children in HK is already expensive so undergrad degrees might not make up the bulk of child care expenses. In HK I've met many graduates of Southern California, a school I'd never heard of until I moved to HK. Even after working for 10 years, none have earned back the cost of their degrees and I doubt their parents care.

    So when they do the cost benefit analysis, there's more value put on the potential benefits of the degree vs the cost. So I think it makes sense that American and British degrees are favored - they've got the highest potential economic upside.

    On the flip side, my cousin bought an apartment in Vancouver for his daughter so that when she's eligible for high school he'll ship her over to Canada (with her mom). We have a large family and he's hoping my cousins will toughen her up. I doubt many parents have a similar mindset. He doesn't think she'll be economically successful regardless of what school she attends.


  2. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,150
    Quote Originally Posted by Viktri
    In HK I've met many graduates of Southern California, a school I'd never heard of until I moved to HK. Even after working for 10 years, none have earned back the cost of their degrees and I doubt their parents care.
    USC - University of Southern California - is a very expensive private university in Los Angeles. It doesn't have a particularly academic reputation within the US but for some reason in Asia it's a popular destination. In some specialist areas especially at graduate it's pretty good but for standard undergraduate, it's not really anything special. In California people call it "university of spoiled children."
    hullexile and shri like this.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    24

    A similar topic: https://www.quora.com/A-degree-from-...a-Do-you-agree

    I would say, if your child happens to be extra-ordinarily gifted in one of these sports: baseball, basketball, american football, then going to an American University is probalby a no-brainer.


  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    1,479
    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckFan
    A similar topic: https://www.quora.com/A-degree-from-...a-Do-you-agree

    I would say, if your child happens to be extra-ordinarily gifted in one of these sports: baseball, basketball, american football, then going to an American University is probalby a no-brainer.
    I don't see why you are singling these sports when it's extremely unlikely a kid from this side of the world would be able to obtain a scholarship in them. Far more likely and common in sports like tennis, golf or track. There are plenty of other options to get full rides beyond the three big college sports.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    654

    Same with HK, Singaporean, Other Asian, Other European, Australian and NZ universities. First, the US and UK are or were the motherland of empires. The UK was the former ruler of HK, so is ranked above other commonwealth countries including Canada and Australia. Second, the US and UK are larger economies and have two important global cities of NYC and London, with stronger commercial and financial ties with HK than other western countries, larger number of multinational banks and other companies in HK. Third, top US and UK universities are more famous than Canadian, Australian and other universities in Asia. The UK is a top choice because many civil servants and or their children had subsidies to study in the UK before the handover.

    As for more Chinese moving to Canada than the UK, US, Australia or NZ. It is probably because it is easier to get the migrant visa. And Canada tends to attract more economic migrants from Asia than other western countries.

    Last edited by lighthse003; 28-12-2018 at 01:31 PM.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,150
    Quote Originally Posted by Golem
    I don't see why you are singling these sports when it's extremely unlikely a kid from this side of the world would be able to obtain a scholarship in them. Far more likely and common in sports like tennis, golf or track. There are plenty of other options to get full rides beyond the three big college sports.
    I had a classmate at my American college who had a full ride for synchronized swimming! If you have a athletic girl child, lots of opportunities for $$$ towards tuition fees in the US. So that's another factor: sporting prowess is better supported at an American university vs. Canada or UK or most other nations.
    ChuckFan likes this.

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    24

    A detailed article that may explain why even some Canadians choose American universities:
    https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/robert...b_3094416.html


Reply
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4