Reply
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Like Tree20Likes

Toddlers in Pre-Nursery only going a few days a week

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    17,964

    Ahh - my kids are up at 6am, not 9am. Big difference! They're all in bed at 7:30pm, though the older ones are allowed to read until 8:30 on school nights and as long as they like on weekends. I'm sure you can figure out a good schedule when you arrive.

    Mrs. Jones and jimbo_jones like this.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tuen Mun
    Posts
    1,741
    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo_jones
    I think we would like him to be able to speak Mandarin / putonghua and be able to recognize the Chinese alphabet. It would be big bonus if he could read/write putonghua and cantonese in another three years. We think he will be okay on English, but neither of us speak read/write Mandarin or Cantonese at home. We probably put him down for Australian International School in HK as plan-B.
    I know this will not be top of your concerns at present, but I hope you understand there is NO "Chinese alphabet." At the beginning stages of Putonghua literacy (and often for computer input) people will use the Roman alphabet pinyin, but otherwise the main reason that local education relies so much on brute rote learning is because there is no other way to learn the thousands of Chinese characters needed to be literate in Cantonese or Putonghua. Speaking the language is easy enough, but if you want your son to learn to read and write he will certainly need to have additional support after school hours.
    jimbo_jones and merchantms like this.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,260
    Quote Originally Posted by chingleutsch
    I know this will not be top of your concerns at present, but I hope you understand there is NO "Chinese alphabet." At the beginning stages of Putonghua literacy (and often for computer input) people will use the Roman alphabet pinyin, but otherwise the main reason that local education relies so much on brute rote learning is because there is no other way to learn the thousands of Chinese characters needed to be literate in Cantonese or Putonghua. Speaking the language is easy enough, but if you want your son to learn to read and write he will certainly need to have additional support after school hours.
    This is true. No way around rote memorization when it comes to Chinese characters. We are a relaxed family but will have "fun" tutoring for my kindy student starting after summer holidays once a week.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by chingleutsch
    I know this will not be top of your concerns at present, but I hope you understand there is NO "Chinese alphabet." At the beginning stages of Putonghua literacy (and often for computer input) people will use the Roman alphabet pinyin, but otherwise the main reason that local education relies so much on brute rote learning is because there is no other way to learn the thousands of Chinese characters needed to be literate in Cantonese or Putonghua. Speaking the language is easy enough, but if you want your son to learn to read and write he will certainly need to have additional support after school hours.
    I've sort of assumed up to 200K for school, plus another 50% for 'tutors' and activities. It's similar sort of 'thing' in Australia, with similar prices, with Saturday sport traffic jams being worse than m-f peak traffic. In Korea they have the Hagwon buses shuttling kids from this to that afternoons to late evenings.

    Hopefully he will know a few languages, show an interest in some form of musical instrument and does the arts/crafts and can run around and climb. I don't think we can help him enough to be competitive in a Chinese-language first school. I'm hoping him to get a decent immersive head-start out in HK, and be okay if we send him back to Australia for school.

    Thanks for the input and suggestions.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    18

    This is the difficulty we are facing now for our son, since he will start P1 in 2021, we need to determine if we really want to pursue local school with non-english medium of instruction this year.

    Local friends tell me that if I pursue a local school, then my son will need go straight to high school with the local chinese exam which is very difficult even for them.

    Another issue is all of my son's classmates do not speak english so sometimes my son feels isolated specially when going to school trip where no one speaks english.

    Feedback from expat friends also say that they try to go to chinese local school in K1 but they eventually decided to move to english school and observed that there is a big difference in how happy and active their son was in learning after the move.
    Maybe it's a case to case basis but I know my son is not really interested in learning Chinese language.

    chingleutsch likes this.

Reply
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2