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Conversion Exam for PCLL Entry - UK Graduate

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  1. #1

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    Red face Conversion Exam for PCLL Entry - UK Graduate

    Hi there,

    Wondering if there's anyone whose familiar or who has been through the Conversion Exam and managed to apply for Exemptions for the 11 core modules that's been sat for during the LLB Law degree? I have just graduated from a UK uni intending to sit the PCLL (2020) if all goes well. However after researching I understand that I will have to undergo the Conversion Exams. My questions is as follows:

    Are you able to successfully apply for the core modules that has been done in UK/any commonwealth countries?
    If so, was the exams difficult, in terms of a UK standard or a higher standard than that?
    Also, I heard that it is a 'self-study' course which would put me at a disadvantage and might need help, is there any other institutions that provides classes for the exams that I will have to be studying for? Is HKUSpace highly recommended?

    I have emailed my questions to PCEA but have not heard from them for some time I am not a HK citizen as well so largely unfamiliar to this. Any information/insights would be appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance!


  2. #2

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    I do think this question has been dealt with previously in great detail - check some of these threads.

    https://geoexpat.com/search?q=PCLL


  3. #3

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    Hi Shri,

    Thank you for your reply, I have browsed through the first page but will look further again. I was wondering if you know of anyone who isn't a HK citizen and sat for the PCLL, or if you have any insights of. In terms of visa, how do they go about being able to do their pupillage/TC post PCLL in HK? I'm also doubtful that firms are actually willing to sponsor visa to a foreigner in their pupillage/TC stage, correct me if I'm wrong. Is it advisable to seek a visa agent for this matter, or any other recommendations?

    I'm considering this only because it would be redundant for me to take the conversion exams, having sat through PCLL only to discover it is difficult or near impossible to be able to secure a TC at a firm in HK due to visa restrictions..


  4. #4

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    klaudia1 likes this.

  5. #5

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    My advice, don't become a lawyer. Reward is shit for the hours you have to work.


  6. #6

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    Spoken from experience? Were you a lawyer in HK? Coming from and comparing to Malaysia personally, HK is still a better 'reward' and experience etc

    Last edited by klaudia1; 03-09-2019 at 07:00 PM.

  7. #7

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    Thanks so much Shri really appreciate it!


  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by klaudia1:
    Hi there,

    Wondering if there's anyone whose familiar or who has been through the Conversion Exam and managed to apply for Exemptions for the 11 core modules that's been sat for during the LLB Law degree? I have just graduated from a UK uni intending to sit the PCLL (2020) if all goes well. However after researching I understand that I will have to undergo the Conversion Exams. My questions is as follows:

    Are you able to successfully apply for the core modules that has been done in UK/any commonwealth countries?
    If so, was the exams difficult, in terms of a UK standard or a higher standard than that?
    Also, I heard that it is a 'self-study' course which would put me at a disadvantage and might need help, is there any other institutions that provides classes for the exams that I will have to be studying for? Is HKUSpace highly recommended?

    I have emailed my questions to PCEA but have not heard from them for some time I am not a HK citizen as well so largely unfamiliar to this. Any information/insights would be appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance!
    PCEA just charge the fee for administering and marking the exams so I wouldn't expect them to offer advice to you on what to do.

    As long as you can print out copies of the syllabi for the courses you did which correlate to the topics on the list of 11 core modules, you should be able to get several exemptions, if not the majority. Coming from a place like UK, Australia, NZ, you won't find the exams challenging so long as you look at some past papers, write some practice answers and do some reading on the relevant topics.

    On the visa issue, once you do the PCLL you will hold a degree from a HK university and can apply for a work visa s a non-local graduate without any need for employer sponsorship: https://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/services/visas/IANG.html
    klaudia1 likes this.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paxbritannia:
    PCEA just charge the fee for administering and marking the exams so I wouldn't expect them to offer advice to you on what to do.

    As long as you can print out copies of the syllabi for the courses you did which correlate to the topics on the list of 11 core modules, you should be able to get several exemptions, if not the majority. Coming from a place like UK, Australia, NZ, you won't find the exams challenging so long as you look at some past papers, write some practice answers and do some reading on the relevant topics.

    On the visa issue, once you do the PCLL you will hold a degree from a HK university and can apply for a work visa s a non-local graduate without any need for employer sponsorship: https://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/services/visas/IANG.html
    Hi Paxbrittania,

    Thank you kindly for your answers, specifically on the visa issue it was much appreciated. I have submitted the form for exemption, and was told that I would only need to print out the topics upon request by the Committee. Do you think studying for 5 modules would be extremely bulky?

    With regards to post PCLL, how difficult is it to secure a training contract as I understand how competitive it is? Is there an apparent bias towards foreigners, where firms would most likely hire a local grad instead? I also understand that they are most likely to hire someone who speaks both Cantonese and Mandarin, does language barrier plays a huge factor in this?

    I do speak Mandarin Chinese however not as fluent as most (intermediate) which I would need to work on, just wondering how important of a role this plays, as I bumped into a lawyer once working for Allen & Overy that said it wouldn't be much of a problem. I am fluent in English and Malay though.

    Apologies for the multiple questions ha but I have yet to meet more HK lawyers to get my answers for this.

    Many thanks!!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pin:
    My advice, don't become a lawyer. Reward is shit for the hours you have to work.
    Pin is right - for the amount of hours you have to put in, it ain't great. I am talking from experience. Can you imagine, the trainees here work crazy hours and are underpaid? I once left my house-keys in the office. I came back at 9:30 after dinner outside and the trainees were still at the office.

    If you want to do it, i find that it is easier to get qualified overseas and then come as an experienced lawyer. If you practice an area that is global/international, you wouldn't need PCLL. You can get registered as a Foreign Lawyer if you meet their requirements.
    klaudia1 likes this.

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