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What book will you read next

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  1. #231

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    Nine Nasty Words - John McWhorter

    He was on Bill Maher, sounded like an interesting fella


  2. #232

    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle - Stuart Turton.

    One of the most interesting and enjoyable novels I've read for a long time.

    https://www.amazon.com/Seven-Deaths-...13MZPPP276153N

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  3. #233

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  5. #235

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    Just read, "Dune," after watching the moving. I understand why it was thought that it would be impossible to translate to film. So much of the book had to be truncated or completely omitted because it was very dense with inner monologues and lots of exposition about the universe in which the novel takes place. The obvious solution would be a voice-over but excessive voice-over is clunky movie-making.

    Dune is sort of the "OG" SciFi novel as you can see its influence in so many things that have followed - Star Wars, Watchmen, and Star Trek, which may be considered a contemporary work.

    Anyway, worth a read. It must have been mind-blowingly original when it was first published.

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  6. #236

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    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    Just read, "Dune," after watching the moving. I understand why it was thought that it would be impossible to translate to film. So much of the book had to be truncated or completely omitted because it was very dense with inner monologues and lots of exposition about the universe in which the novel takes place. The obvious solution would be a voice-over but excessive voice-over is clunky movie-making.

    Dune is sort of the "OG" SciFi novel as you can see its influence in so many things that have followed - Star Wars, Watchmen, and Star Trek, which may be considered a contemporary work.

    Anyway, worth a read. It must have been mind-blowingly original when it was first published.
    It certainly blew me away, would have been mid 1970s when I read the first one I think so not too long after publication.
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  7. #237

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    Quote Originally Posted by hullexile:
    It certainly blew me away, would have been mid 1970s when I read the first one I think so not too long after publication.
    That's how I felt about The Three-Body Problem. I couldn't shut up telling my friends what an amazing read it was.
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  8. #238

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    Just finished reading the tell-all book "Red Roulette" by Desmond Shum, where this former well-connected HK businessman with many dealings with the mighty and famous in China, revealed the corrupt and dark secrets of doing business on the mainland. He wrote it after his ex-wife "disappeared". I won't spill the means on the details, but after his former wife vanished in 2017, he decided to write this book for his son.

    As a biography, the book is very well-written, not a surprise after I discovered it was ghost-written by long-time China watcher and journalist John Pomfret. It keeps you wanting to turn the page. Shum charted his beginnings in Shanghai, moving to HK as a kid, struggling to adapt to the new culture of the city, having poor relations with his parents, graduating from a US college and then moving to China and meeting his mainland wife, which opened his eyes to how "things are really done" on the mainland.

    To be honest, if you have any business dealings on the mainand, many of Shum's allegations would not be new or surprising, from developing guanxi, greasing the palms of officials to cut through the bureaucratic red tape and how senior mainland officials get doors opened for them simply because of who they are and not what inherent ability they have. None of those things are really all that shocking.

    What is truly revealing though is the level of detail that Shum goes into to describe his experience. How he called out certain famous people, the specific way corruption operates on the mainland, and how anyone can simply vanished at the drop of a hat, those are quite interesting and novel. Although I don't think Shum will ever get to return to visit the mainland after he has published this book....and probably will never see his now ex-wife.

    Last edited by Coolboy; 20-11-2021 at 08:35 PM.
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  9. #239

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coolboy:
    Just finished reading the tell-all book "Red Roulette" by Desmond Shum, where this former well-connected HK businessman with many dealings with the mighty and famous in China, revealed the corrupt and dark secrets of doing business on the mainland. He wrote it after his ex-wife "disappeared". I won't spill the means on the details, but after his former wife vanished in 2017, he decided to write this book for his son.

    As a biography, the book is very well-written, not a surprise after I discovered it was ghost-written by long-time China watcher and journalist John Pomfret. It keeps you wanting to turn the page. Shum charted his beginnings in Shanghai, moving to HK as a kid, struggling to adapt to the new culture of the city, having poor relations with his parents, graduating from a US college and then moving to China and meeting his mainland wife, which opened his eyes to how "things are really done" on the mainland.

    To be honest, if you have any business dealings on the mainand, many of Shum's allegations would not be new or surprising, from developing guanxi, greasing the palms of officials to cut through the bureaucratic red tape and how senior mainland officials get doors opened for them simply because of who they are and not what inherent ability they have. None of those things are really all that shocking.

    What is truly revealing though is the level of detail that Shum goes into to describe his experience. How he called out certain famous people, the specific way corruption operates on the mainland, and how anyone can simply vanished at the drop of a hat, those are quite interesting and novel. Although I don't think Shum will ever get to return to visit the mainland after he has published this book....and probably will never see his now ex-wife.
    Great book report . . . it's in the queue.
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  10. #240

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    Quote Originally Posted by huja:
    That's how I felt about The Three-Body Problem. I couldn't shut up telling my friends what an amazing read it was.
    I recently read this and enjoyed it; have you read the two other books in the trilogy and if so do they hold up to same standard?

    (Same question to Hullexile)

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